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11

Sleeve It When running any tubing (PEX, ABS, PVC) through concrete you need to de-couple it, Even 6mil plastic suffices, but sill guard is better. A tubing sleeve (e.g. 1.5in ABS) like you propose through the wall, is good too. Hot and Cold You can run PEX under ground. I have done this successfully. Hot and cold to the exterior, then cold to an out building....


8

I don't know California specifics, but "Polyethylene well water pipe" is a common material for direct burial installation - get the 200 PSI version for the thickest walls / most durability. Quick look at an online supplier finds (no shock) that the 160 & 200 PSI well water pipe is PE 4710 resin high density PE. Thus, not so hard to find. If ...


7

You can do it a bit at a time. Of course, any bits that are leaking that you don't replace will continue to leak until you replace them. You can (or could when I was shopping, it was some years back) beat the price of a manifold with a handful of Tees and Valves. Pex does not require the use of a manifold, though the idea of using individual home runs of ...


6

Ask the supply house if they have a waterworks division or if they can give the name of a local waterworks distributor. (Ferguson is a national waterworks distributor who happens to have branches in a few California cities, for example.) You may be more likely to find the HDPE tubing through waterworks channels rather than traditional plumbing/building ...


6

I can answer the first 3 questions, having done a significant amount of research and a few plumbing repairs on the 3 houses I've owned, first with copper lines, second with pex "homerun" and third with PVC piping. Yes, line size has a significant effect on availability of hot water, and it comes down to volume. A 3/4" pipe has 2.25x the ...


4

I will answer #4 as Frederic did a great job on the first three. Yes you need to replace the city home run right now for 4 reasons. Based on things being opened up it will be cheaper. You need to see how big you can go. If you can go 1" go 1". 3/4" should be the minimum. (For a house that size you do not need more than 1") You do ...


4

Every picture I've seen of polybutylene shows it as pale blue PEX is almost always bright blue (when it is blue). In addition, polybutylene breaks down over time. The chances it's survived in a water main this long is low.


3

It is most likely fine. As others have pointed out, PEX comes coiled and it is completely acceptable to have it installed with curves and arcs, like this: PEX is not like copper or iron pipe. Rigid pipe is... well... rigid, so we get used to thinking of plumbing as begin built from straight sections, but that isn't the case with PEX. I'm assuming the ...


3

I'm from the prairies! Haw! We have gophers like crazy here and I've never heard of them eating into electrical pipe. For ease of pulling and overall durability I'd consider using rigid PVC or direct burial pipe. Pex quality often varies as well(I've seen batches sent back for being too brittle in winter, too soft in summer, for having too thin of wall. ...


2

23 gauge hardware cloth strikes me as something that won't have a long life when buried in the ground. I'm no gopher expert, but taking your word for it that some protection is needed even at 30" depth, I'd think about encasing the PEX and cables in something else: solid-core SCH40 or even SCH80 PVC conduit or pipe. Not SCH20, class 200, nor foam-core ...


2

"Need" is defined by the connection you want to make. As you've discovered, shutoff valves (supply stop valves for use with a fixture) with 3/4" inlet practically don't exist. Therefore yes you'll need to adapt the plumbing to the inlet of whatever shutoff valves you can find. Shutoff valves are widely available with inlets of either 1/2" ...


2

Under no condition, and in no way, are you going to get multiple hoses running at 'full pressure. Yes, absolutely run a 3/4 inch line from the main and make sure there are no places where the line gets smaller. Using the new type-A pex or old fashioned copper will keep a 3/4 inch inside diameter the entire way, while the older type-B crimp connections use ...


2

I am hesitant to use the PEX cutting tool on this line due to its age. Umm, 10 years is nothing for PEX. If its age truly concerned you then shouldn't you be more worried about keeping it in service where it risks flooding your house? Like the other answer states, there should be no issue with cutting and adding a tee to the existing line unless it's had ...


2

The copper side of the joiner will have a standard thread, connect there. leave the mystery blue plastic side undisturbed. Dig under the join so you can recconect it without grit getting into the threads.


2

As long as the fittings at the transition points are compatible with both types of PEX, go for it Plumbing codes generally permit the materials they allow to be mixed freely provided suitable transitions are provided where materials change. So, you can simply use a fitting that's compatible with both PEX-a and PEX-b at the transition points.


2

In my jurisdiction Dallas TX, PEX is buried just like soft copper tubing used to be, and where the PEX goes through concrete it is sleeved or wrapped. One plumber that I know says this is unacceptable to him. He puts all PEX that is under a slab in Sch 80 PVC or continuous PB (polybutylene). He said that no splices can be buried under a slab. All PEX under a ...


1

There is a saying in mechanical engineering: pressure makes flow. The operating pressure from your city waterworks is essentially fixed. The pipe coming into your house has resistance, much like in an electrical circuit, creating a maximum amount of water that can flow through it per second, and pretty much nothing downstream of that constriction can do ...


1

PEX is stable it does not dry rot so it should not split unless it has been subjected to sunlight or uv radiation.


1

Yes. Opt for PEX-B per https://homeefficiencyguide.com/can-pex-tubing-be-buried/ Make sure to protect brass fittings and metal crimp rings from the soil with a silicone wrap or just lather them in silicone from a caulk gun and let it cure before burying. PEX's primary enemy is UV light so make sure to protect it if it exits the earth to supply the spigot.


1

Yes to pex all types, some sources: https://www.landscapemanagement.net/benefits-of-evolving-irrigation-pipe-products-2/ http://blog.supplyhouse.com/pex-crimp-vs-pex-clamp/ http://blog.supplyhouse.com/direct-burial-of-pex-tubing


1

I am currently running a 1995 rheem gas water heater. I've flushed it once. I've never replaced the anode. I installed a floodsafe water detector shutoff solonoid so that if a leak on the floor occurs the cold water supply is shutoff from the hot water tank. I have a floor drain which goes to a plastic sump basin with pump that is embedded in the slab. I ...


1

Disconnecting and reconnecting those lines will stress the connections and cause them to fail. It should be simple enough to tap into that 1/4" line using a tee connector as you suggest and then adding a 1/4 inch shutoff valve on the tapline. Following is a link to some inexpensive components but you can probably find them at your local hardware store ...


1

There are reasons that they are not readily available. And it is because they shouldn't really be used in most cases. Having 3/4" water pressure times 2 (hot/cold) is going to blow out filters and gaskets for toilets and sinks which are not really manufactured for that much water pressure. I had a sink at my old house - which had bad water pressure in ...


1

You can keep it all 3/4 PEX, or you can reduce it to 1/2 to save money and space, or to deal with parts availability. Most fixtures (sink, toilet, tub, shower) don't need 3/4 all the way, but it is not forbidden or bad to do so. When branching off, you can use a PEX Tee fitting that also reduces. You can branch off at 1/2 at each fixture, and continue with 3/...


1

I would measure the depth to the stop point in the fitting - different fittings different depths. A small ruler will be sufficient or a vernier caliper will do nicely. Without the make of the other fitting we cannot say, and even then it might or might not be shown on any drawing we can find.


1

Presumably you are in an area where the temperature dropping to zero (°F) is unusual. Crank up the heat in the room, or the whole house. Don't know that I'd bother with a hairdryer - they are noisy and need someone to hold them in place. This won't be quick, as a rule. A portable electric room heater with appropriate safeguards left to run for a while should ...


1

Here's what I would do. If you feel industrious, I would remove that entire cavity's worth of drywall so that the entire wall cavity between the studs is exposed. Then remove all of the batt insulation. Buy a sheet of XPS or polyisocyanurate foam board insulation, cut it to fit, and install it behind the PEX pipes and the outside wall. You want the foam ...


1

PEX labeled fittings are uniform (essentially). You can use any pex labeled fitting with any pex labeled tubing and any pex labeled crimp ring, provided they are all labeled for the same size tubing and the manufacturers literature shows as astm compliant. For ordinary residential remodeling you don't need to be concerned with pressure ratings of the ...


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