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5

PEX pipe does not corrode or otherwise interact with copper or other materials the way dissimilar metals do. It's essentially an inert substance under normal circumstances. The bulges and darkened areas, however, do appear to be signs of a problem and I agree with your assessment that these were caused by heat, probably from the torch used to sweat the ...


3

You're dealing with some major renovations. I don't think we would be able to answer that accurately just by looking at pictures. The easiest part would be rerouting the electric cables. Junction boxes could be mounted to the joists but the boxes would have to be accessible forever. The plex plumbing would be a nightmare and the drain piping almost ...


3

Rats are not specifically attracted to PEX, but they do have to "seek out opportunities to" chew on things all the time. Their incisor teeth never stop growing, so if left unchecked they would grow so long that the rats would no longer be able to open their mouths and starve to death. So they are compelled to keep them worn down by biting on things all of ...


2

Update: We are still not sure what caused the issue, but we had the plumbing company come out and do a vinegar wash of the entire system. This worked and the smell is gone.


2

Your crimp ring looks good to me as well. It takes a lot of crooked to make a pex fitting leak. I've only managed a leaking pex fitting once, but I'd say if you're more than about 10 degrees off, you risk leaking. However, for future reference, when I'm working in tight spaces where I'm concerned I might cause a leak, I use sharkbite fittings. While they ...


2

If 1/2 PEX would have been large enough to do the runs but the contractor used 3/4 instead, then: he (you?) paid the higher per-foot cost on the larger tube and paid for each adapter the tube holds more water, so if this is a hot water run, it'll take comparatively longer for the hot water to arrive at the fixture. If the runs really do merit the use of 3/...


2

Check all the aerators for clogs. When you repipe you can dislodge a lot of rust and gunk from the old pipes and it can clog the filters. Also check the shower heads for the same thing. If the problem is with a specific faucet you might want to remove and check out the cartridge.


2

As Michael Karas' answer said, cost will be minimal and it will be easier just to run a new pipe. Additionally, do you use the outdoor sink in the winter? Insulated or not, you should probably winterize that plumbing if it's susceptible to freezing.


2

That blue water service line could be PEX, but it also could be HDPE. If it's HDPE then it might be CTS (copper tube size) or IPS (iron pipe size). Based on the shade of blue I'm leaning toward HDPE, but it's hard to tell in a photo. Use a small mirror to inspect the full circumference of the pipe -- it may have something printed on it indicating the type. ...


1

Subject to being a matter of opinion, but for contrast: Pump, 200PSI black poly water pipe, pitless adapter (freezing climate, exit well casing below ground) 160PSI black poly waterpipe, house, filter, pressure tank. Plain poly, not pex. No fancy upcharge brand, just basic well poly marked NSF-PW (National Sanitation Foundation Potable Water, as far as I ...


1

Here in Italy pex is widely used for new heating system (both radiators and underfloor), just check the maximum allowed temperature is high enough (I'd say over 120°C) and you could use it for both flow and return. The story is different if your heating is steam. The slope could be there because originally it was naturally-circulated hot water (hot water) ...


1

I don't have any first hand experience, but I don't think there's anything wrong with using PEX for a hot waater heating system. I base this on two recent observaations. 1) A new $million+ house I was in uses PEX to distribute hot water from a central boiler & manifold to places of use. 2) My son's old house used PEX to send hot water from the boiler ...


1

As far as I can tell that coupling is called a PVC Compression Coupling and according to the product page it should only be used to connect PVC and/or galvanized piping. In the Q&A section of the product page the manufacturer states: This is designed for connecting piping and repairs of PVC and galvanized pipe. It is not directly compatible with Pex. ...


1

Since you say there is access on both ends it seems that the best course of action is to just pull in some new PEX line with insulation sleeve installed. The cost of materials should not be so much as to break the bank account and it would be far far easier than trying to save what is tunneled into that narrow area.


1

I would assume there's a pressure regulator somewhere after the meter mounted on your house ? Loosening the locknut(s) and turning the adjustment clockwise will increase that flow.. You might not have to go thru all this, if your place has a pressure regulator.


1

As long as the crimp ring is correctly positioned over the brass barbs, you should be fine with it slightly crooked like that. I don't have a source to back that up though, so maybe I shouldn't have answered.


1

I had to replumb my house to get rid of the crappy poly-B piping that has been vexing me with leaks for the past two decades. Rather than rip out my interior to put new PEX pipes in, I ran two 3/4 inch PEX risers up inside my chimney chase from the basement all the way to the attic. From there, I located the top wall plates and dropped half-inch lines off ...


1

Apparently yes. This website has a couple of suggestions to mitigate the concern. (Rataway and Havoc): https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/pex-rodents-problem-please-read.5154/


1

There are a few things: In your main electrical panel there should be a ground wire connecting to the ground rod. If there is another ground wire connecting to the homes plumbing (or from the ground rod to the plumbing), the main electrical service is using your homes metal plumbing as a second ground. Even if the service line is plastic, the metal pipes ...


1

The inside diameter (ID) of PEX fittings is smaller than the ID of the pipe, and the ID of the PEX pipe is smaller than the same size copper pipe. When the system was designed, the outside diameter was kept constant but the inside diameter shrank (compared to copper). This sounds like PEX might have much lower flow rates, but the silver lining is that PEX ...


1

This was the method that worked for me in the end, though I'm sure not the only way to do it. First, I would "pre-bend" the tubing basically as much as possible, past 90° even, before adding the support. While the tubing starts to return to its original shape right away, this added curvature still reduced the effort to add the support significantly. This ...


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