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4

Although copper may not be required, it is possible that PEX is prohibited. One reason for this would be building codes / regulations. For instance, the UPC states: 604.11.2 Water Heater Connections. PEX shall not be installed within the first 18 inches (457 mm) of piping connected to a water heater. The specifics of what your local regulations state ...


4

God no! I've had two leaks, out of literally tens of thousands crimp conections. Both leaks were installer error. One time my tool suddenly went out of calibration which I could feel in the action and quickly remedied. The other time I crimped it way crooked and I returned the next day with my compound offset crimper, cut out the bad connection and recrimped....


3

Rats are not specifically attracted to PEX, but they do have to "seek out opportunities to" chew on things all the time. Their incisor teeth never stop growing, so if left unchecked they would grow so long that the rats would no longer be able to open their mouths and starve to death. So they are compelled to keep them worn down by biting on things all of ...


3

The life span of Pex can be as much as 40 years. When you make the connection to the old tubing, I would use a Sharkbite fitting at that point instead of crimping. You won't use near the pressure and they hold really well.


3

I think you've hit on the problem. I'd carry a bucket of hot water with me and dunk the segment to be bent for a few seconds before doing so. Pex is really stiff when "cold" (below 60° F or so). It should then bend more easily and somewhat hold the shape after it cools. Use plenty of pipe hangers adjacent to the bend support to, er... support the ...


2

That is for PEX-A (Wirsbo/ProPEX/Expansion). Its the expansion type, not the crimp type that is PEX-B, cheaper, and available at big box hardware stores. PEX-A is slightly better for strength and leaching, and is available from supply houses but costs a bit more. The way that PEX-A is, it tries to return to form when expanded, so with a special tool it is ...


2

PEX pipe won't slide off the fittings if spun because they are on there through compression and not screwed on. I've spun the crimp style fittings without issues but never spun the style you have before but from what I've read, you can spin them with out issue. If you decide to cut the pipe, remember you'll need a spreading tool to reconnect the pipes or use ...


2

When you say "push connection" I assume you mean a push-to-connect adapter. They're often called "Sharkbites" colloquially, although Sharkbite is only one of several manufacturers that make them. The push-to-connect fittings are more convenient to work with because they don't require special tools to make the connection, and it's possible to remove them and ...


2

Your crimp ring looks good to me as well. It takes a lot of crooked to make a pex fitting leak. I've only managed a leaking pex fitting once, but I'd say if you're more than about 10 degrees off, you risk leaking. However, for future reference, when I'm working in tight spaces where I'm concerned I might cause a leak, I use sharkbite fittings. While they ...


2

If 1/2 PEX would have been large enough to do the runs but the contractor used 3/4 instead, then: he (you?) paid the higher per-foot cost on the larger tube and paid for each adapter the tube holds more water, so if this is a hot water run, it'll take comparatively longer for the hot water to arrive at the fixture. If the runs really do merit the use of 3/...


2

Check all the aerators for clogs. When you repipe you can dislodge a lot of rust and gunk from the old pipes and it can clog the filters. Also check the shower heads for the same thing. If the problem is with a specific faucet you might want to remove and check out the cartridge.


2

As Michael Karas' answer said, cost will be minimal and it will be easier just to run a new pipe. Additionally, do you use the outdoor sink in the winter? Insulated or not, you should probably winterize that plumbing if it's susceptible to freezing.


1

Since you say there is access on both ends it seems that the best course of action is to just pull in some new PEX line with insulation sleeve installed. The cost of materials should not be so much as to break the bank account and it would be far far easier than trying to save what is tunneled into that narrow area.


1

I would assume there's a pressure regulator somewhere after the meter mounted on your house ? Loosening the locknut(s) and turning the adjustment clockwise will increase that flow.. You might not have to go thru all this, if your place has a pressure regulator.


1

As long as the crimp ring is correctly positioned over the brass barbs, you should be fine with it slightly crooked like that. I don't have a source to back that up though, so maybe I shouldn't have answered.


1

Apparently yes. This website has a couple of suggestions to mitigate the concern. (Rataway and Havoc): https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/pex-rodents-problem-please-read.5154/


1

There are a few things: In your main electrical panel there should be a ground wire connecting to the ground rod. If there is another ground wire connecting to the homes plumbing (or from the ground rod to the plumbing), the main electrical service is using your homes metal plumbing as a second ground. Even if the service line is plastic, the metal pipes ...


1

The inside diameter (ID) of PEX fittings is smaller than the ID of the pipe, and the ID of the PEX pipe is smaller than the same size copper pipe. When the system was designed, the outside diameter was kept constant but the inside diameter shrank (compared to copper). This sounds like PEX might have much lower flow rates, but the silver lining is that PEX ...


1

The "heat tape" you are referring to is what we use in Western Maryland as the "go to" way to keep our PEX piping from freezing. It works great and is a low cost way of making sure your pipes don't freeze. Warning though, make sure you have a way of always knowing the tape is working. If you bury it behind a wall totally and can't check it a few times ...


1

I discovered the answer to my own question. I went to the Delta™ site after looking up Delta™ faucets on Amazon™, and discovered that this widget is indeed an integral part of the spigot -- it allows Delta™ sprayers to be plugged in and functions as the diverter. Or the diverter receptacle. Unfortunately Delta™ doesn't offer a mating sprayer in the nickel ...


1

Uponor Ecoflex is your best bet here. https://www.uponor-usa.com/~/media/uponor/sidebar%20brochures/pips_pg_h460_0113a.ashx?version=012120130317. You will need, as others mentioned, a schedule 80 sweep to sleeve the concrete penetration. Use expanding spray foam to seal the open end of the pvc. Using the foam insulation below grade....will get saturated with ...


1

I had to replumb my house to get rid of the crappy poly-B piping that has been vexing me with leaks for the past two decades. Rather than rip out my interior to put new PEX pipes in, I ran two 3/4 inch PEX risers up inside my chimney chase from the basement all the way to the attic. From there, I located the top wall plates and dropped half-inch lines off ...


1

This advice is coming from a Master Electrical Engineer who graduated from Penn State in 2012, so take the advice with a grain of salt. First off, these days water lines going through Attic are standard practice especially if you have a slab concrete foundation. The makes the price affordable and allows for minimum tear down during the plumbing repair. ...


1

Cut off about 6 inches of PEX at the used end and add a coupling and then add about 8 inches or new PEX. You get virgin pipe and a bit extra slack this way. (why do these plumbing posts always sound like a set up for a lewd joke?)


1

I think that you'd probably have to ask your Pex manufacturer to get an official answer as to whether or not this is recommended. But I can say based on personal experience that I've occasionally done what you propose without issue. And if you try it and it turns out not to work because the connection leaks, it will only have cost you a ~$0.50 crimp ring, ...


1

I see your system design viable and acceptable, however modern practice would dictate 1" main lines, 3/4" sub-lines and 1/2" branch to individual fixtures. I would run 1" to the manifold. Depending on the individual length, 3/4" and 1/2" would be run to the fixtures.


1

I didn't read all the answers and comments but, The pressure of the static system will not change due to the pipe size. A quarter inch line will experience the same pressure as a 1-inch line with all valves off at the fixtures. The difference between a quarter inch line and a 1-inch line is when there is flow, or dynamic pressure, you will get more pressure ...


1

Here is something I did in a friends home. I/we changed the 1/2" copper water line to 3/4" copper from the water meter to the hot water tank and teed off any existing cold water supply lines. That way, both the hot and cold water lines would utilize more water while not spending a lot of money to replace all or even some of the individual 1/2" supply lines. ...


1

Bad idea. Enlarging hot water lines will dramatically increase the inventory of water sitting in those lines. I.e. How much water is in the lines themselves. I.e. How much cold water those hot water lines are full of, when you first turn on the shower. I.e. How long you must wait for the cold water to be pushed through and become hot. You reduce ...


1

This was the method that worked for me in the end, though I'm sure not the only way to do it. First, I would "pre-bend" the tubing basically as much as possible, past 90° even, before adding the support. While the tubing starts to return to its original shape right away, this added curvature still reduced the effort to add the support significantly. This ...


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