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6

PEX pipe does not corrode or otherwise interact with copper or other materials the way dissimilar metals do. It's essentially an inert substance under normal circumstances. The bulges and darkened areas, however, do appear to be signs of a problem and I agree with your assessment that these were caused by heat, probably from the torch used to sweat the ...


3

I agree with Solar Mike that a vacuum may work to pull a string, If the smurf tube or flexible nonmetallic conduit is 1 piece. The nickname is from a kids carton where the characters are blue. Having 9 or more flex lines going through a 4” makes me think this would not be 1 piece or the flex ends at the 4”, so you will need to try a fish tape. A fish tape ...


3

You're dealing with some major renovations. I don't think we would be able to answer that accurately just by looking at pictures. The easiest part would be rerouting the electric cables. Junction boxes could be mounted to the joists but the boxes would have to be accessible forever. The plex plumbing would be a nightmare and the drain piping almost ...


3

Rats are not specifically attracted to PEX, but they do have to "seek out opportunities to" chew on things all the time. Their incisor teeth never stop growing, so if left unchecked they would grow so long that the rats would no longer be able to open their mouths and starve to death. So they are compelled to keep them worn down by biting on things all of ...


2

If 1/2 PEX would have been large enough to do the runs but the contractor used 3/4 instead, then: he (you?) paid the higher per-foot cost on the larger tube and paid for each adapter the tube holds more water, so if this is a hot water run, it'll take comparatively longer for the hot water to arrive at the fixture. If the runs really do merit the use of 3/...


2

Check all the aerators for clogs. When you repipe you can dislodge a lot of rust and gunk from the old pipes and it can clog the filters. Also check the shower heads for the same thing. If the problem is with a specific faucet you might want to remove and check out the cartridge.


2

As Michael Karas' answer said, cost will be minimal and it will be easier just to run a new pipe. Additionally, do you use the outdoor sink in the winter? Insulated or not, you should probably winterize that plumbing if it's susceptible to freezing.


2

That blue water service line could be PEX, but it also could be HDPE. If it's HDPE then it might be CTS (copper tube size) or IPS (iron pipe size). Based on the shade of blue I'm leaning toward HDPE, but it's hard to tell in a photo. Use a small mirror to inspect the full circumference of the pipe -- it may have something printed on it indicating the type. ...


2

Update: We are still not sure what caused the issue, but we had the plumbing company come out and do a vinegar wash of the entire system. This worked and the smell is gone.


2

Maybe you can use a hand file or a sharpening stone to get a surface flat enough for the ring washer to seal on, hand-held power tools are unlikely to produce a satisfactory result. But your best bet is probably teflon thread sealing tape. it takes crazy amounts of tape to get a good seal. put 6 or 7 layers on That hose clamp looks kind of dodgy, I think ...


2

It certain makes a difference - apparently 70 cents. Functionally, no difference, or possibly (hard to be sure from the small images and I'm not going to bother to hunt down the parts elsewhere) the brass is set up / sized to be a male part for soldering into a female copper port, while the copper appears to be a female copper port to have a male copper ...


2

You will actually need a second driven rod to be safe with the metal pipe to the house being replaced. NEC 250.66(A) allows for #6 copper. Also, that rod is not fully driven. My jurisdiction requires the rod to be driven the full 8’. If you leave the old galvanized in the ground and it is in contact with earth for 10’, then you would not need the second ...


2

I think you should take off for the outside faucet from the 3/4" PEX. This will have a lesser effect on the water pressure inside the house than taking off on the 1/2" line that goes to the kitchen. You can always throttle back at the outside faucet if you need to. EDIT You could run a 1/2" line to the outside faucet, split off from the 3/4&...


2

This is ENT (corrugated PVC), not anything like PEX What you're looking at is most likely ENT (Electrical Nonmetallic Tubing, aka "smurf tube"), not any sort of tubing/pipe intended for plumbing work. Running a Cat6 cable through this should be not an issue at all, provided you stay within the fill limits of the ENT you are using. As Ed Beal mentions, you'...


2

I Build homes in Arizona and use 100% PEX in construction. To be honest with you I have never noticed any odor at all from the pipe so my guess is the odor must dissipate. I lived in a house that was PEX as well and did not notice a smell. I imagine it could be different if you are already living in an enclosed home when the PEX is installed, but there are ...


1

I would say this would be much better than the current surface mount of the pex. It will look better and less chance of damaging the lines.


1

Pressure loss in a pipe is proportional to the flow through the pipe. A garden hose has potential for high flow, meaning higher pressure loss in the pipe, and you mention that the system pressure is already "not that great." I can think of two reasons not to use a larger-than-necessary pipe: when it simply costs too much to use the oversize pipe (...


1

1/2" is fine for individual fixtures such as sinks and dishwashers, but high flow fancy showers should be 3/4" Also, your trunk line should have been 3/4". It also depends upon the water pressure supplied by your utility or well. If it's high enough, you can "get by" with 1/2" but bigger is usually better. The only ...


1

You will need to check carefully regarding the tubing. There is evidence that this tubing is the style that has a cut all along one side from end to end. Tubing like this that has a split is designed to be used where the cable can be inserted into the tubing without having to thread it in all from one end. Such tubing is primarily used to protect the cable....


1

Subject to being a matter of opinion, but for contrast: Pump, 200PSI black poly water pipe, pitless adapter (freezing climate, exit well casing below ground) 160PSI black poly waterpipe, house, filter, pressure tank. Plain poly, not pex. No fancy upcharge brand, just basic well poly marked NSF-PW (National Sanitation Foundation Potable Water, as far as I ...


1

Yes, the piping (which in your case is pex) will be visible from the wall or floor to your cut off valve. You can put escussion rings on pipe that lay flush against the wall to give it a more finished look.


1

The pex usually goes into fittings that are set into the wall. I used 1/2” elbow fittings well secured for two sinks and a shower. For the shower the fittings had to be on 153mm centres and a bracket was made for that. Here is a link to the type I used: https://www.hornbach.ch/shop/Raccord-de-serrage-angle-de-mur-16x2mm-1-2-IG/7011451/article.html


1

Here in Italy pex is widely used for new heating system (both radiators and underfloor), just check the maximum allowed temperature is high enough (I'd say over 120°C) and you could use it for both flow and return. The story is different if your heating is steam. The slope could be there because originally it was naturally-circulated hot water (hot water) ...


1

I don't have any first hand experience, but I don't think there's anything wrong with using PEX for a hot waater heating system. I base this on two recent observaations. 1) A new $million+ house I was in uses PEX to distribute hot water from a central boiler & manifold to places of use. 2) My son's old house used PEX to send hot water from the boiler ...


1

As far as I can tell that coupling is called a PVC Compression Coupling and according to the product page it should only be used to connect PVC and/or galvanized piping. In the Q&A section of the product page the manufacturer states: This is designed for connecting piping and repairs of PVC and galvanized pipe. It is not directly compatible with Pex. ...


1

Since you say there is access on both ends it seems that the best course of action is to just pull in some new PEX line with insulation sleeve installed. The cost of materials should not be so much as to break the bank account and it would be far far easier than trying to save what is tunneled into that narrow area.


1

I would assume there's a pressure regulator somewhere after the meter mounted on your house ? Loosening the locknut(s) and turning the adjustment clockwise will increase that flow.. You might not have to go thru all this, if your place has a pressure regulator.


1

Apparently yes. This website has a couple of suggestions to mitigate the concern. (Rataway and Havoc): https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/pex-rodents-problem-please-read.5154/


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