13

That's from Best of Wordless Workshop by Ray Doty; the original was a monthly column in Popular Science. (Published sometime between 1971-1985) The retail versions probably make more sense, but you can hum the theme from the A-Team while exterminating with this one. Besides, Wordless Workshop was a great feature.


12

Wasps only use these nests for a year and then abandon them. If you haven't seen any activity it should be safe to just knock it down. By the looks of your picture and your description it does seem like an old, unused nest. Have a fly swatter with you to be safe, but a nest that small isn't going to have wasps pouring out of it. I'm sure you could just ...


10

Chances are about 90% that these are Western Fence Lizards, commonly called "Blue Bellies" because of two large bright blue swatches on their undersides. These lizards are eating your bugs, especially ticks. They typically eat their own weight in bugs every day so getting rid of them will result in a bug population explosion. Studies have shown Lyme disease ...


9

Looks like a Western Conifer Seed Bug. Or what my family calls a 'stink bug' because they stink as a defensive measure or when squished. It's a pest but not harmful to humans. Just annoying. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_conifer_seed_bug


8

Vinegar and baking soda will produce carbon dioxide very quickly; the reaction will be over in a matter of minutes. And dry ice requires special handling and going back and forth to the store many times to procure fresh ice. A better way to continuously produce 1 to 3 humans' worth of carbon dioxide over a period of about 3 to 4 days is via (yeast) ...


8

Try searching "mouse bucket trap". There's a ton of different variations, so I'm not going to go into too much detail. But basically it's a bucket, a ramp, some peanut butter, and a rotating mechanism. If you want to kill the mice, put some antifreeze (or other poison) in the bucket. If you're looking for less lethal, leave the bucket empty, or put in some ...


7

You have to be careful here, because it's possible that those holes are there for ventilation, as John said. So instead of trying to seal them completely, the absolute most you should do is cover them with some kind of mesh which will have holes small enough to keep out the flies but large enough to allow air flow. A metal screen mesh - the kind used in ...


7

Personally I would just fill the holes with dirt, why does it need to be more complicated than that? Concrete isn't going to stop them any more than dirt, since presumably the yard is mostly dirt anyway.


7

Yes, unless you are an inspector yourself. Inspections often catch things owners don't know about. The owner may have maintained it meticulously, but he can only fix the problems he knows about. My home inspector caught a few safety issues like pitch of the exhaust from the water heater and a sharp edge around a flexible gas line in the fireplace. You should ...


7

I dont think birds would be so sneaky. It is going to be a mammal. You can catch it. source I like live catching over poison because poisoned animals die and rot and stink. Once you catch one you can display it to your landlord. Then he can pay for a pest control person to come catch the rest and most importantly, seal up the way they are coming in. Your ...


6

Most mosquito traps produce carbon dioxide by burning propane: http://home.howstuffworks.com/mosquito-magnet2.htm


5

Stop using over the counter products. They don't really work. There are some sure fire ways to get rid of roaches inside. Of course this is only for moderate infestations. If you have small children you may not be able to take the approach I recommend. Read all warnings on pest control products, especially if you have birds or small pets. The ...


5

The best advice I can give is to do some research on the type of snake it is. Is it native? Is it venomous? What does it eat? Where does it like to live? And then you get rid of the types of things it likes to live around. Most snakes that live around people are harmless and pose no risk to health or property. Usually they are doing quite a bit of good ...


5

There is no such thing as a white ants. Termites are white, however. Termites require two things: wood and water in the same location. If you have termites, you need to eliminate any contact between wood and moisture in the house. Note that wood in contact with the ground is automatically considered "moist".


5

I think I finally found a solution. I had tried chicken wire, and it was moderately helpful... apparently, frogs couldn’t use it. I tried angling tree branches for critters to crawl out on, but that didn’t work for frogs, either. So, I bought some pool noodles and cut them to secure around the top of the window well, and there have been no more critters in ...


5

Yes, the void is the space inside the wall. It could be between joists in a wood wall or in the channels inside concrete blocks. It basically just means empty spaces in a wall.


5

When I had a bad infestation from the previous owner's dogs, I used flea "bombs" with Precor. Most insecticides will kill the adults, but if you have eggs, you will need something that prevents the eggs from maturing. Precor is one of the brand names for the growth regulator that does this. I wasn't living in the house yet, but I was painting the inside. I ...


5

Some ideas: Lay heavy landscape fabric or galvanized hardware cloth and rock under the entire area. Leave the space open enough that it doesn't appeal to den-seekers. Install a skirt and place a row of pavers or large rocks around it. Install wire mesh down to the ground and then outward a foot or so. Cover it with skirting and landscaping. Install wire ...


4

My trick to get rid of inaccessible wasp nests is to set up a shop vac for a half a day sucking at their entry point. Once all the wasps are in the shop vac I suck up some raid spray. I then seal up the hole in the house. Works well. I guess if you really want to let them go you could take them somewhere and release them out of the shop vac. Good karma?


4

Every time I have dealt with a rodent issue they ALWAYS eat the poison pellets. Now can you live with a dead mouse somewhere? Maybe it isn't the best inside way to catch them. But if you hit them with pellets all along the outside of your house 2-3 heavy sweeps over a course of a few months they will all be dead or close. They share food when close. I ...


4

I've enjoyed dusting flour (from the kitchen) onto the floor overnight, thus showing me in the morning the mouse/rat travel path. That in turn can inform the best trap locations.


4

You can seal the hole with duct seal. It is a putty-like substance, which can fill the hole around the pipes. Duct seal does not harden, so it is easy to remove in the future. You may have to cut the pipe insulation just short of the hole so you get a good seal. It may be a good time to replace that whole section of insulation while you're working in the ...


4

You should lay a bait down. I recommend Advion, which is a product from DuPont or MaxForce, which uses fipronil. You can do a search on Amazon or a similar site for "Advion ant" or "MaxForce ant". The bait comes in a plunger that you can use to apply in small places. Find out where they are trailing and put a few drops down. You can put the drops on ...


4

I work with an extermination company. The pictures aren't that clear, but the first one seems to be a Confused Flour Beetle and I would imagine the second one is the same. The Confused Flour Beetle feeds on flour and grains but do not bite. The best way to eliminate them is to go through your pantry and throw out any infested items. The remaining items ...


4

It's unlikely to be a major issue with reused traps. Just check that there's not a little rust or something developed that is causing them to stick. You could try a square of chocolate as the bait. If you heat the pin on the trigger platform, you can push the chocolate on and it's stuck there. That makes it harder for the mice to get away with the bait.


4

I have personally moved to the "plastic cheese" traps and use them with no bait (other than the supposed, and probably fictional IMHO, "odor in the plastic." They have a large target area and a trigger of adjustable sensitivity - if it gets stepped on, it gets tripped. I reuse them without undue care (I do leave them out in the weather for a while if they ...


4

Do not allow squirrels or any animals access to roof by eliminating trees which are less than 6 feet away.


4

The most cost-effective methods of termite control, in descending order: Live where it's too cold for termites - $ Treat the soil around the perimeter of your house with termiticide once every 5-10 years - $ Build a physical termite barrier around your house out of metal, fine sand, cementboard, or some other material that termites can't eat or pass through,...


4

Just mix baking soda with vinegar and you will get all the CO2 you want. Make sure that the jar is big enough because this reaction causes bubbles; the liquid will expand. Also, keep one more thing in mind CO2 is heavier than air meaning that you should somehow put the zapper inside the jar so it would be near CO2 and not over it; because I don't think that ...


4

For starters, that's a really amazing shed! As for the termites, they're swarming. This is natural in termite areas. They're looking for wet or rotting wood to start a new nest. So, odds are you should have nothing to worry about with the new shed, as hopefully none of it is rotting yet. None of your options will really have any impact on swarming termites....


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