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18

Prior to drilling the "through-hole", mark the location on both sides and use a paddle-style wood boring bit slightly larger than the O.D. of your flat washer, to make a large flat-bottomed hole. Make the holes no deeper than necessary to make the nut, washer, and bolt end sit flush (you would need a shorter bolt). For more precise creation of a flat-...


7

And another option would be to use a beveled washer. I would use a dado for all of the joints in all of the answers just to avoid slippage strain on the bolt/wood interface.


5

The simplest way is to recess the washer and nut into the angled brace. Using a spade bit slightly larger than the washer Mark where you want the hole. Start a hole in the right side face of the brace, perpendicular to the face of the wood. As soon as the tip of the bit has a good bite, angle the drill until it is perpendicular to the opposite angle cut of ...


5

Wood siding on a house is there for weather protection and looks, it has little structural strength. The ledger board is used to connect the patio cover beams to the internal structural members of the house walls for strength against wind shear forces and (possibly) snow loads that will want to pull your cover away from the house, spreading that force across ...


4

Minor variation to recessed holes, if you don't have or don't want to buy a spade or Forstner bit: cut a flat face into the angled support. Ensure that you leave at least 50% of the width of the angled support for strength.


4

At the ground, you're mostly concerned with keeping the posts located. You don't want bumps to slide them around. A simple steel pin or bolt in the concrete is adequate. If you like, use a short stack of washers to keep the wood (mostly) out of contact with the concrete to improve longevity. At the top, I'd use 1/2" lag screws, countersunk and piloted. Two ...


3

You need to install knee braces every where you can. (The diagonal piece) Ideally, the ends should be tightly dadoed a small amount into the beam and post to minimize the inevitable play that develops in connections made solely of mechanical fasteners. The bigger the brace the better, within reason. The best bracing would be the grand-daddy of knee braces-- ...


3

Here is the answer to my actual question: http://awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc Edit: Sorry if I'm not on the same wavelengths as anyone else. I already know about insurance and inspectors, and that was not at all what I was asking about. I just wanted to know what length of wood would span a certain distance given various criteria....


3

First answer! (On an old question.) Could the side beams that run perpendicular to the house extend almost all the way to the house? That would provide an additional 3.5-4’ of coverage along the house side, where we typically place deck furniture. I'm assuming you mean the rafters (that rest on the beam) would cantilever over the 17' beam by 4'? That will be ...


3

Try Simpson's Outdoor Accents Product Line. Catalog here


3

Triangles are stable, squares are not. Finish the knee braces. You might be able to make them more simply by making them from narrower material that will fit between the beam members as they are (ie, they don't need to be the same width as the post, so they can be the same width as the cut-down section of the post the beam is wrapped around.) Depending on ...


2

Well...I had to live and learn. I used 12 inch sonotubes with the same anchor and cheap cement (the fence post kind that was recommended to me) and 6 x6 posts, which turned out to be a bad idea. 2 of the 4 cement piers cracked part way down where the achor ties were. My solution was to build 21 inch squares around the base about 12 inches down and past the ...


2

You can easily span 12' with a 2x12 for a pergola as long as your load is not crazy. What is going on top of the 2x12's? 2x2's? I would set my posts on 12' centers and cantilever 4' on each side. I would also sandwich a 2x12 on each side of the post. There actually is enough information in your question but there are many online beam span charts. Here is ...


2

There is nothing that anyone on the internets can help you with. You have to do more due diligence to each board. If ONE board isn't tapped in correctly it will throw off everything. In a room as big as yours that is a huge mess. I have worked with your exact flooring and all that I can say is completely scrutinize every board. Also you should not be ...


2

I haven't worked with the newer Pergo; the last I installed was in 2007. However, check the installation basics (from here and here): Are you installing in the correct direction? The tongue facing upward should be on the floor and the next piece goes on top of it. Is the floor flat? Is the flooring material acclimated to between 65 °F and 72 °F ...


2

Well, I couldn't find your exact pergola at newenglandarbors.com, but similar ones did specify a 5" post. So the numbers might be right. In any case, lay the parts out on the ground. The "bent" that's made up of two posts and the beam that sits between them will probably have a natural way that it goes together. Measure that width and set your base brackets ...


2

The top could be a traditional mortise and tenon joint (possibly haunched for resistance to twist). You'd want the tenon to be pushed to the interior in any case, as the end grain on the joist is weak. But @isherwood is right that mechanical fasteners are a strong alternative.


2

I think one would use redwood or cedar for a pergola exposed to the weather.


2

The problem isn't that there's anything wrong with PT 2x4s. The problem is that you're spanning 10 feet with, presumably, no support or bracing. A 2x6 is much more appropriate for what you're doing. Another option would be to stick with 2x4s and run boards the other direction, maybe less often or maybe using smaller lumber, to create a grid structure. This ...


2

You can use the Sagulator. Putting in some quick numbers for Ponderosa Pine, I found a single 2x6 on edge to be acceptable for an 11' span holding up to ~1000 pounds total. Laminating 2 or 3 together will be plenty acceptable, and may be overkill, depending on the wood you're using.


2

Not to big of a concern. You could take a 12" sono tube, slice it length wise and then pull it open enough to get it around the post. Then just overlap the slice and glue it with outdoor construction adhesive. Once the glue sets you can back fill around the outside of the tube with soil, keeping it plumb and straight, and then you are ready to fill with ...


2

Vernacular architecture - what's the worst that could happen? Build it and see if it fails. If it fails, build it again stronger. Seems unlikley to kill anybody or ruin your house if failure happens. Vernacularly sturdier - don't cantilever it, add two more posts on the open side. Or let it fail, if it's going to, then do that when rebuilding.


2

I think you've got several issues: I don't think that the single screw holding each end of the bracing in place is sufficient. You might consider adding a 2nd screw at each end of each diagonal brace. I would put the 2nd screw at a different angle than the original (i.e. if the original lower screw is horizontal, add a 2nd screw at a 45° angle up). This ...


2

"Pressure treated wood" isn't one thing. It's many things. Some is rated for ground contact or below grade use. Most isn't. You'd need lumber that is. You won't keep it from getting wet underground, but you can keep it from being constantly saturated by giving the concrete sleeve a drain at the bottom. One strategy is to set the post on gravel and ...


2

I suppose you could do what you're describing; but, my years of building deck and fence in college tells me it's a bad idea. Even with rock and shale (and no topsoil) wood resting on the ground picks up water, which accelerates rot, even if the wood is treated. Also, nearly all deck framing assumes strong anchor points, so a wooden base (enforced or not) ...


1

To accomplish the join I'd acquire some 1/4" by 3-1/2" by 24" steel plates and let them into opposing sides of the posts to act as gussets. I'd use countersunk flat-head sleeve bolts, piloted accurately and minimally, to sandwich the whole works. Be sure to consider whether the existing posts are adequately anchored, as there will be substantial torque ...


1

If it's an "open" roof system, then yes. If it's a "closed" (solid) roof system, then it must be able to withstand snow loads. (I know, where you live you don't get snow, but to meet Code, it needs to support a minimum of 20 lbs. per square foot of snow.) Therefore, with a closed roof system 2 - 2x6 Redwood joists can span about 12' -6" when supporting 4' ...


1

How to correct for the gaps is a challenge if you just decide to "stick something in there" such as caulk or shims. I say that because anything you do along those lines is going to look crappy and kludged up. The best solution would be to do a re-install by carefully measuring each individual piece and cutting it to the correct length. Done that way then a ...


1

I personally think you are over-complicating the situation. You should think less about how to find an engineered product (Such as LVL and PVL) to solve the problem and instead look at why the wood itself bends and twists. Wood will in itself act in line with its grain and organic structural make up. The biggest factor in how a piece of wood 'settles' into ...


1

I'd use vertical grain 2x4 cedar or redwood kiln dried down to 6-8% (interior standards). The problems: 1) pressure treatment: I would NOT use pressure treated material. they are adding liquid to the member...which creates more drying out and more warping, and 2) larger boards (use 2x6's rather than 2x4's) which will twist more than smaller boards as more ...


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