We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

18

Prior to drilling the "through-hole", mark the location on both sides and use a paddle-style wood boring bit slightly larger than the O.D. of your flat washer, to make a large flat-bottomed hole. Make the holes no deeper than necessary to make the nut, washer, and bolt end sit flush (you would need a shorter bolt). For more precise creation of a flat-...


12

The pergola is much like a stick framed house--the framing itself resists vertical forces (gravity) but in and of itself, has no resistance to shear forces (side to side). For a house to stand up on its own, the sides need to be braced against shear forces...typically that's done with plywood sheathing. Barring that, diagonal bracing can be used. On the ...


10

Well, it seems totally safe to me, it's not going to fall on you unprovoked. You won't be able to drive a truck into it, but you can sit under it. You can't land an aircraft on it, but it should be able to handle the rain and snow. It's not really load bearing, and it looks beautiful. However, if you're afraid, grab a Kreg joint kit and screw them together ...


7

And another option would be to use a beveled washer. I would use a dado for all of the joints in all of the answers just to avoid slippage strain on the bolt/wood interface.


6

I think you have built a fine looking pergola. Congratulations. I'm quite sure you will be fine once you add diagonal support members from the posts to the joists. You can simply screw them (2X stock) into place in the void side of the 4X4 to 2X6 or get fancy and mortise them. Either way is going to give you the lateral support so the structure will not ...


5

The simplest way is to recess the washer and nut into the angled brace. Using a spade bit slightly larger than the washer Mark where you want the hole. Start a hole in the right side face of the brace, perpendicular to the face of the wood. As soon as the tip of the bit has a good bite, angle the drill until it is perpendicular to the opposite angle cut of ...


5

Wood siding on a house is there for weather protection and looks, it has little structural strength. The ledger board is used to connect the patio cover beams to the internal structural members of the house walls for strength against wind shear forces and (possibly) snow loads that will want to pull your cover away from the house, spreading that force across ...


4

At the ground, you're mostly concerned with keeping the posts located. You don't want bumps to slide them around. A simple steel pin or bolt in the concrete is adequate. If you like, use a short stack of washers to keep the wood (mostly) out of contact with the concrete to improve longevity. At the top, I'd use 1/2" lag screws, countersunk and piloted. Two ...


4

Minor variation to recessed holes, if you don't have or don't want to buy a spade or Forstner bit: cut a flat face into the angled support. Ensure that you leave at least 50% of the width of the angled support for strength.


3

Here is the answer to my actual question: http://awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc Edit: Sorry if I'm not on the same wavelengths as anyone else. I already know about insurance and inspectors, and that was not at all what I was asking about. I just wanted to know what length of wood would span a certain distance given various criteria....


3

You need to install knee braces every where you can. (The diagonal piece) Ideally, the ends should be tightly dadoed a small amount into the beam and post to minimize the inevitable play that develops in connections made solely of mechanical fasteners. The bigger the brace the better, within reason. The best bracing would be the grand-daddy of knee braces-- ...


3

The simplest solution would be to run tensioned cables diagonally across the top of the trellis. Since it is tied to the (hopefully? ;-) ) solid brick wall, it will resist torsion along the diagonals. Then the posts will be relegated to their proper job of keeping things up.


2

I'm not sure how the cross beams are attached to the support beam near the house, but it seems to me that would be the point you need to focus on. Any small amount of flex in the outer most posts can be translated into movement, because the cross beams are able to torque at the ends. You may be able to eliminate this torquing, by adding in an additional ...


2

This is quickly going to become too complicated to tell you for sure if your deck will be able to support a structure like a pergola, but if it is even half the weight of your typical hot tub then your deck will very likely not support it. To accurately determine this you need to figure out the additional #'s/sq ft of load that a structure as large as a ...


2

Well...I had to live and learn. I used 12 inch sonotubes with the same anchor and cheap cement (the fence post kind that was recommended to me) and 6 x6 posts, which turned out to be a bad idea. 2 of the 4 cement piers cracked part way down where the achor ties were. My solution was to build 21 inch squares around the base about 12 inches down and past the ...


2

You can easily span 12' with a 2x12 for a pergola as long as your load is not crazy. What is going on top of the 2x12's? 2x2's? I would set my posts on 12' centers and cantilever 4' on each side. I would also sandwich a 2x12 on each side of the post. There actually is enough information in your question but there are many online beam span charts. Here is ...


2

There is nothing that anyone on the internets can help you with. You have to do more due diligence to each board. If ONE board isn't tapped in correctly it will throw off everything. In a room as big as yours that is a huge mess. I have worked with your exact flooring and all that I can say is completely scrutinize every board. Also you should not be ...


2

I haven't worked with the newer Pergo; the last I installed was in 2007. However, check the installation basics (from here and here): Are you installing in the correct direction? The tongue facing upward should be on the floor and the next piece goes on top of it. Is the floor flat? Is the flooring material acclimated to between 65 °F and 72 °F ...


2

Well, I couldn't find your exact pergola at newenglandarbors.com, but similar ones did specify a 5" post. So the numbers might be right. In any case, lay the parts out on the ground. The "bent" that's made up of two posts and the beam that sits between them will probably have a natural way that it goes together. Measure that width and set your base brackets ...


2

The top could be a traditional mortise and tenon joint (possibly haunched for resistance to twist). You'd want the tenon to be pushed to the interior in any case, as the end grain on the joist is weak. But @isherwood is right that mechanical fasteners are a strong alternative.


2

The problem isn't that there's anything wrong with PT 2x4s. The problem is that you're spanning 10 feet with, presumably, no support or bracing. A 2x6 is much more appropriate for what you're doing. Another option would be to stick with 2x4s and run boards the other direction, maybe less often or maybe using smaller lumber, to create a grid structure. This ...


2

You can use the Sagulator. Putting in some quick numbers for Ponderosa Pine, I found a single 2x6 on edge to be acceptable for an 11' span holding up to ~1000 pounds total. Laminating 2 or 3 together will be plenty acceptable, and may be overkill, depending on the wood you're using.


2

I think one would use redwood or cedar for a pergola exposed to the weather.


2

Not to big of a concern. You could take a 12" sono tube, slice it length wise and then pull it open enough to get it around the post. Then just overlap the slice and glue it with outdoor construction adhesive. Once the glue sets you can back fill around the outside of the tube with soil, keeping it plumb and straight, and then you are ready to fill with ...


2

Vernacular architecture - what's the worst that could happen? Build it and see if it fails. If it fails, build it again stronger. Seems unlikley to kill anybody or ruin your house if failure happens. Vernacularly sturdier - don't cantilever it, add two more posts on the open side. Or let it fail, if it's going to, then do that when rebuilding.


1

Hi this is Jason of Builderbeast. I built this pergola, and was also not thrilled about the size of that Simpson connector. I had a larger 1/2" stainless mount fabricated. It extended about 12" up the column.


1

This is Jason Roberson of Builderbeast. I built this pergola out of Western Red Cedar a few years back. At the top I mortised the post into the beam and pinned it from the side with a ledger lock, then plugged the hole. Everything is cut at 11 degrees. I made a jig for all cuts for consistency and calculated all the measurements as if they were rafters on ...


1

That pergola was built a few years ago by Jason Roberson of Charlottesville, VA. I'd write to him and ask how it is holding up and what he might do differently. https://builderbeast.com/new-construction/decks-and-built-ins/ One of the photos shows that the top joint was pinned laterally. See: Note that the exifdata in most of the images date the ...


1

Pretreating the wood with a UV absorber (like bis(Biphenyl)triazine or a benzotriazole) will be helpful. UV Boost or other UV protectants will help with whatever stain or sealant you use. You can also mix light inhibitors with stain or sealant.


1

The 4" to concrete figure you see is a minimum clearance value, and really has nothing to do with the size of the footing required to support a load or prevent twisting or uplift. The size(volume) of the footing is what your engineer calculates out to have adequate mass to support/hold down your structure. One thing I noticed on the spec sheet you linked to:...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible