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34

I've done it two ways. Take a coat hanger and bend a 1" 90 degree at the end of a straightened out hanger. Insert the bent edge down into the seem and twist the hanger so the 1" piece turns under the paver you want to pull up. work it back and forth with a screwdriver in the opposite edge while pulling the paver up. My other trick was to drill a ...


23

Using a crowbar or screwdriver etc. lift the pavers to the left of the sunken ones first. Lift the ones numbered 1 and 2 in the image: Then you should have enough room to dig out the sunken ones.


19

I've recently seen a video but can't find the link. Consider a Flexible Joint Knife, or the equivalent in a fairly wide spatula. Get a pair of them, to enable uniform lifting. Slice from each edge of the spatula about one-third of the way inward, about an inch or two from the bottom. Bend those cut tabs in the same direction. As you force the tool into the ...


14

Try using a pressure washer and a wet/dry vac to erode the sand and debris in the gap between the pavers. That'll hopefully get you to a place where at least the paver block can wobble freely, which will ease lifting it up. For lifting.. if you're lucky, and/or have a sufficiently large vacuum, the paver might be lifted by vacuum alone. A ring of clay or ...


13

Just to add to the various hints, and complete the picture of available techniques, professionals who do this a lot would use a vacuum slab lifter, something like this: Source: Express Tools However your surface area may be too small for this, but even smaller attachments are made for bespoke situations. A bit much of a purchase for a one-off, but worthy of ...


11

For brick driveways the most important part is a solid compacted base--crushed quarry rock or shale, not crushed river rock. Sand is normally used, not mortar. For a “green” drive, place the holes vertical and fill with dirt and then grass seed. I have done this and if kept moist with drought resistant grass it works well (but I live in the grass dead ...


10

Sounds like you need a firmer subbase under your sand to spread the load across a wider area. I would follow the same procedure as for laying a wider area such as a patio. It seems like a lot of effort for a small area like the one you have but unless the ground underneath is already very hard and level, the pavers are going to settle unevenly and/or slide ...


10

I have run into this many times usually with light duty drainage pipe for the gutters . I really like a solid base I use more rock and less sand but 6” for a patio is good. I would expose a little of the pipe and stop at 5”. When packing the gravel work to the pipe from both sides but don’t pack directly over it until both sides are packed. This reduces ...


8

I am going to say they can... but no. There are tons of varieties of bricks that are used for pavers. There is no reason to go with your garden variety house brick. To be clear the OP is talking about something very similar to below - clay cored brick. Take a good look at this brick - as this is a pretty smooth example. Do you want to walk on ...


8

Polymeric sand is a fine sand that is combined with additives that form a binding agent when exposed to water. Silica is such as an additive and is often used to help lock the fine sand particles together. As the sand particles fuse, the joint between two patio pavers becomes impenetrable and the pavers are locked in place. https://unilock.com/articles/what-...


6

The pavers will definitely take care of the moat and deflect the rain water. However, you will still get some rain from the roof hitting the pavers and splashing against your wall. Don't forget about the wind, rain doesn't usually fall straight down so you'll get that wetness too. Long term solution would be gutters.


6

What works for me is using two pruning saws. Place one in the gap on each side of the paver, then twist each one so the teeth grab the paver. Then lift. Easy.


5

I live in the Pacific Northwest also. I have done several paver walks, I have used regular sand and polymeric sand. What I have found is a good even base is the most important part of the job. Regular sand tends to need a new bag about every 3 years and polymeric is going on 5 but will need an add this year. For me both tend to grow grass because our horses ...


5

I assisted with a project like this. Pavers usually have a chamfered edge which is a little easier on bare feet than the sharper corners and edges of bricks but they worked fine. The sand is a really good idea though. In addition to stabilizing the bricks, it will reduce the weed growth between them which means you'll have more time to enjoy the patio.


5

There are also paving sands with weed killer mixed in. Once example is "Dansand" from this vendor: Dansand Manufacturer Site I believe there are other similar products on the market that you might consider as well.


4

Do you need? No. You could technically lay them down on grass and they'd probably be OK for a short period of time. But the next person who rents the house will be annoyed, and so might the landlord when the pavers settle. A 30kg of gravel is about $5 at my local HD - so how much money are you really saving here? And lets say you save $50 - if they ...


4

No tips other than doing it properly. Otherwise the pavers will be all wonky and wavy within 1-2 years in most cases. You could try digging down the height of paver, compacting a little, putting pavers in and fill cracks with dirt and planting grass in the cracks. No guarantees from me on the result over time though. Chance of this working out would ...


4

I did this years ago along one side of my home and it's worked well. The area between the pavers and the house you'll want to turn into a little flower bed or mulch it over as trying to mow it can be a pain (was for me anyway). I also put some pavers at the end of my downspouts to prevent erosion there. A few on the ground then one on top so the water ...


4

Use 100% sand to embed and backfill the pipe; 1/4" gravel fines at the largest. Anything larger can point load the pipe and will lead to subsidence when the material migrates. Material that would permit migration of fines from the native material should not be used for the replaced foundation. For example, crushed rock or a gravel material containing ...


3

The drawbacks of not using a proper base is that, over time, the pavers will sink and become completely uneven. If it's mainly a cost issue, I don't know if any real alternative that would be cheaper. If you stick with your plan, I'd consider going with crushed rock for your compacted base (you can't really compact sand) and then put a 1" sand layer on ...


3

A hand compactor will not cut it I am afraid. Is there no one where you live renting out plate compactors by the day? The subbase and sand need to be really compacted, flat and laid to falls, for the concept of block paving to even work, plus you also need to run the compactor over the finished paving (using the supplied rubber mat) to settle in the paving ...


3

Blue, or blueish-purple (ie, at a slight angle so it's away from both the house and garage, but closer to blue.) You want to get the water away from the building, not funnel it alongside the building. Responding to comment: developing a grade is a "simple-yet-tedious" process, for the most part. My preferred method is to set some stakes 3-4 feet tall, mark ...


3

Coarser sand is better. Concrete sand would work much better than mason sand. When I used to do pavers we would use crusher dust. That being said, it's a patio and not a driveway or a road, so I don't think I would be overly concerned if I had already put down mason's sand.


3

As long as the steps are well drained, you need no foundation. Dig deep enough that you can lay down at least 4 inches of coarse stone (1/2" to 1" in diameter) below and 4 inches of regular gravel (1/4" in diameter) on top of that (round is better than angular, if you can find it). On top of the gravel use an inch of sand. Place the stone slabs overlapping ...


3

For my money, relative ease of installation, and the ability to remove and reinstall, I suggest using pressure treated or landscape timber, approximately 4"x"4" (smaller or larger to preference, budget and aesthetics). Place these on the soil (not on top of the mulch), and secure them by driving a 12-16" piece of rebar through the timber and into the soil. ...


3

From the picture you already have your patio installed. To implement the polymetric sand solution or the mortar solution requires that you Pull up the pavers Clean out the sand/dirt between the cracks Reinstall the pavers Apply polymetric sand/mortar I've been working on the same issue but I am trying to not pull up the pavers. The Problem: Dirt gets ...


3

You can use the smaller brick with no stability problems. The only issue you will have is if you chose a "basket weave" pattern when the brick are laid tight. The width of 2 bricks will not add up to the length of a brick side since these are sized with a mortar joint in mind. If you use a stack bond, running bond or even herringbone, you can lay them ...


3

A shorter height makes them more resistant to rotating, but the narrower width makes them more prone. Consider a log on a pond: It's round. Rotates easily. Plank doesn't. More plank like, more stable. Closer to round, less stable. A building brick is exposed on it's edge, so you want to increase the height faster. Standard brick is easy to hold in one ...


3

Sidewalk ants are a thing. They are very tiny. But there are also many species of wasp that do this, and are difficult to spot since they spend time either underground or in flight.


3

Some native soils are really lousy foundation material. They might expand when they get wet; they might heave upward when they freeze, and the list goes on. If a soil movement event happens directly under the pavers then the pavers will move too, and that'll result in an uneven surface, gaps forming, etc. On the other hand, some native soils are actually ...


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