Hot answers tagged

7

Sorry if this simple answer comes across as too basic. But you really could get the decided by looking at your own setup. Rewire at the end that has more slack cable in case you need to cut it off some to re-do it. Evaluate if the wall jack is reliable if re-wired. It may need replacing if not reliable for multiple re-configurations. Evaluate if the press ...


5

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


4

First, make sure any loose or chipping paint is removed. Second, for an area that large, I would use joint compound instead of spackle. Also, a wide taping knife will help. One more tip: For a relatively small area such as this in an existing house, in order not to get so much dust in your house, I recommend the following: Be careful not to apply too ...


4

Microwaves work by exciting the molecules in liquids that then trasfer their heat into surrounding materials. To be safe, "microwavable" products have water in them so that the water molecules are what heats up. If you use a product not designed for this, you could end up volatizing (vaporizing) VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) that are not only harmful, ...


3

No. Or maybe yes. Replicating wood grain even in painted wood or synthetic wood is very difficult. If you create holes large enough for togglers (3/8" minimum), you'll almost certainly need to sculpt the grain channels into the wood filler. If you're a crafty person, it can be done. Of course you'll likely need to paint the entire door face to achieve a ...


3

There are better options to attach temporarily fixtures. I would first try using 3M Command Strips to secure the organizer to the door. In this way you can easily take it down without drilling holes in your door. They also make velcro so you can remove the organizer and put it back later if you wish.


3

Could be that your mud wasn't mixed well and had settled a bit, leaving excess water on top. A firmer application or a more thorough mix might've helped prevent bubbles. At any rate, just skim it again, and press firmly using the edge of the blade. If you do it right it won't even need sanding (or maybe just a wipe).


3

Use a non selective herbicide to kill off the weeds, give it time to get to the roots and destroy them too so when you get a power washer, it will clean EVERYTHING out. Dirt that got in there for the weeds to start on has got to go. The roots that are buried in the cracks will decay and turn to dirt too over time, that is why the herbicide has to have time ...


3

Cut the foam flush, cover it with real drywall, and apply your mud over that.


3

Cold patch asphalt repair can be packed into holes and stands up well for standard car/truck use. If the hole is really deep you can pack crushed rock to fill the hole and save some $. I would not use pea gravel to fill the deeper holes as it never locks together like crushed rock. After filling and adding the patch material I like to run over it with my ...


3

Your repair will never match... perfectly. Your first question: How to remove the bad repair? It will be difficult and you won’t be able to remove it all. I’d start with a chisel and try a grinder when it is low enough that the marks can be covered during the repair. I’d consider cutting that entire section out and replacing it with a new pour......


3

FWIW: I like to use the liquid crack filler for that purpose. Pour/smear it around on the joining surfaces. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Latex-ite-1-Gal-2X-Premium-Blacktop-Crack-Filler-2XCFC/100080909


3

For the space with the copper pipe you could use a thin piece of pine or hemlock trim material that is typically called a lattice moulding. The type I am thinking of is 1/2" thick and 2 1/2" wide. Before installing you would want to patch up, sand, prime and paint the drywall material. Then nail the lattice strip into place and prime and paint it. When I ...


3

I don't understand option 2, but option 1 is exactly what I'd do. A few suggestions: Be sure that the thickness of your drywall brings it to flush or slightly below. Do not install patches that protrude above the wall surface. This will be difficult to tape without leaving a bulge. If you end up with a depression after installing the patches, pre-fill ...


3

Paint will not stick to silicone. You will need to sand it all off, be sure you do not leave any silicon on the board. If you need to do more patching use an exterior Vinyl patching compound Patch, sand , prime and paint.


2

Process is similar to but not the same as drywall -- you patch with the material similar to what the surface is made of. In my case, I had to patch holes made by an electrician hunting between consecutive ceiling joists for active wires. The electrician used a hole saw so I had the discs to put back in, albeit now slightly smaller. If you're just repairing ...


2

Imperfections are hard to see on a white wall. I learned that adding some tint to primer makes the imperfections obvious BEFORE you paint the whole wall, so they can be patched before finish painting. I add a little of the same paint I am going to use to the primer.


2

If you only have chips and small holes to fix, the floor patch and leveler will be a sufficient and cheaper. If the holes are minor ( < 1/2" deep and < 1" in diameter), skim coating the area with your thinset and then pulling the notched trowel will safely allow you to bridge with 12x12 tiles.


2

If the spot is really bad, you can cut it out with a saw, and replace with doweled and glued good wood. Since you're painting, a carefully done job of this shouldn't even be visible.


2

Dig out any rotted wood that you can get to. Soak the wood with wood hardener around the patch area to stabilize the rotted/deteriorated wood that you couldn't get to. Fill with bondo or wood filler in 1/4" layers until slightly bulging from the patch area. Chisel/file/sand down when the final layer is almost completely dry with a sanding block. Prime ...


2

This part of the foundation is most likely spreading out a roof load from a sizable portion of the sunroom roof. If the soil supporting the foundation has eroded away, this will need to be rectified some time next year. For now, get a bag of ready mix mortar, the kind you just add water to, it has sand and cement already mixed in in the correct proportion. ...


2

If you omit the mesh or paper tape a crack will form. I have had luck with a very high end home that had to have some but splices. The owners wanted absolutely flat walls and ceilings (did not care how much it would cost). What I did was cut through the paper on each side of the splice and remove it ~1" on both sides of the joint. Then I was able to add mud ...


2

From your original picture, here's how I would have repaired it: Use some small pieces of (scrap) wood as strapping. Big enough to form a good support but small enough so you can get them into the (massive) hole for the wires. Somewhere between 3/8" and 3/4" would work best. Anchor the strapping with drywall screws. Ideally they can be placed so they're ...


2

Sand them flat (or even slightly dished). Apply joint tape to any cracks (my personal preference is mesh, though you'll find lots of opinions). Apply all purpose joint compound in numerous thin coats. (Purists would have you do the mesh tape coat with a setting compound. Opinions vary, but setting+mesh is technically better.) Let dry completely between coats....


2

You are on the right track. Do I need to use drywall tape, or could I get away with just using the drywall mud? Use tape. It bridges gaps and reduces cracking. Will I need the standard 3 coats of mud? And the wider knives? (I only have a 2" now.) Maybe. Try 2. See how it looks. I would get at least a 4" knife though. How do I avoid bumps from the patch (i.e....


2

In my opinion it's not worth the effort and cost to re-run the wire. As long as the inline splice is properly connected at B, e.g. using proper wire nuts, it is not considered a major hazard. Even if you "improve" it by a wire directly from A to C, it is likely you have other splices in your other circuit anyway. In terms of cover plate vs patching ...


2

If the wire gauge is too small, you do need to replace it. The only reason I can think of code wise that the box was added would be to have no more than 12 feet between outlets or no point more than 6' from an outlet. If you decide to remove the outlet, I would leave a service loop of wire in that location when you pull the new cable in. Remove the old work ...


2

Do Not run afoul of rules requiring receptacles at certain spacing along the wall. Generally any point on the wall must be within 6' of a receptacle using sensible routings, because that is how long lamp cords are. I do not agree with the opinion that splices are a major failure point. Whoever said that isn't very good at splices. Use Ideal brand wire ...


2

Since the 6' / 12' receptacle rules are design rules, not safety rules, and violating them doesn't cause a fire or shock anyone, I wouldn't worry about it. It can be corrected in the future if need be. Since it's an old work box, I wonder if it was even required for the 6' rule in the first place? Maybe if the house is older than the rule. So I'd run ...


2

Eyelets or grommets Sorry for a one-line answer, but that's all you need to know.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible