5

Pressed Wood is a broad category that includes Particle Board, OSB, MDF, and the trademarked Masonite [edit: Masonite is a type of "hardboard], as well as, engineered wood (think: engineered flooring), particle board, and plywood as these all require the product to be pressed (compressed). Particle Board is a pressed wood that includes OSB and, maybe, ...


5

Possible, yes. Recommended - probably not. What purpose to you intend it to serve? Why do you think epoxy coating (intended for application to concrete) makes it better for the purpose? With or without coatings, is particle board even remotely suitable for the purpose? Responding to comment: Marine plywood would have been a much better choice of material - ...


4

I have seen it fail. I have momentarily tried it. And I will never waste my time again. Fail Went through a potential house 8-9 years ago. Mid 60s house. They just put down hardwood to sell it. A floor that had just been laid a few weeks earlier had shifting in at least two areas. I popped off a piece of trim in a closet. Pointed flashlight down, ...


4

You're not clear on the circumstances or the purpose for attaching them. But to answer your question any type of good quality construction adhesive is a very good method of attaching two panels of that size. you can add some screws for reinforcement.


3

If the pieces are naturally pulling out like that, it appears to be warping as well. The temperatures are certainly contributing to the problem but, in my opinion, there are probably 2 other factors. One being moisture and the other being the quality of construction. The piece appears to be made of engineered wood. Engineered wood (particle board, ...


3

Yes, it's more stable, but not to "the elements". While it is constructed with exterior-grade adhesive, the nature of thinly-shaved wood means that when exposed to moisture, repeated flex, etc. it tends to break down sooner than high-quality, solid wood. It's certainly more flat and stable than conventional plywood when kept dry. OSB is less stiff than ...


3

You might want to pre-treat the gap you are filling with shellac or paint so that the raw/cut particle-board is not "sucking up" the filler. On the filler front, for painted boxes, you might visit the auto-body supply and pick up some bondo. Possibly just the 1-part "Glazing and spot putty" will do, but the 2-part (and stinky) standard auto body filler will ...


3

I'd go with an epoxy filler rather than a cellulose based product. You've already got chipboard, and you need all the additional strength you can get. Drill the old holes out to a size larger than the screws, including thread. Fill the holes with a 2 part epoxy and let dry. Level the surface as needed, then drill pilot holes for the screws into the epoxy. ...


3

While there's no problem mounting things to particle board as others have described, 1/2" is just too thin to work with. I would mount another board under your desk using construction or wood glue, at least doubling the current thickness of the top. After that has set up for a day, I'd mount with 3/4" screws (or longer, depending on final thickness), ...


2

Plan A) I'd try to remove the glue, fill the holes†, let it set and then re-drill the holes Plan B) Use repair plates designed for this job Example Plan C) If all fails I'd spend $10 on one of these, put it in my old electric drill's chuck and relocate the hinges. † Using maybe something like an "Interior Wood Filler that holds screws and nails".


2

I'd re-scrape, then smear a layer of white/clear caulk of the tub/tile/sink variety, working it into the 'wood' as much as possible.


2

If this is the only area that's being damaged then you could try screwing some stainless steel sheeting beneath it to act as a heat and steam shield from the dishwasher. You'll need to make sure that the very edge of the steel is not exposed so make sure it doesn't protrude out. And you may need to put some epoxy or similar right to the edge to stop the ...


2

I'd personally choose 1/2" OSB. It's inexpensive, and ought to hold up reasonably well, even against limited moisture. DO NOT USE particle board. It swells way up and then DISSOLVES if it gets wet.


2

I've always had very good results when using polyurethane finish on MDF - particularly on edges, where it is absorbed deeply. I have used it to harden the edges and make them more robust. I'd suggest using it for your purpose also - once dry, I would think the edge would be sandable to a very smooth finish. If paint adhesion is an issue, then I suspect ...


2

You could try brushing the edges with glue. I use Weldbond glue for similar purposes. You can dilute it, maybe a thin coat first to penetrate and seal, followed by a thicker coat to finish it. It's available in large sizes if you'll use a lot. Worst case it's a good glue so even if it doesn't work for your application, it will still be good to have ...


2

I have had success with 5 minute epoxy. The epoxy bonded well with the particle board and allowed for re-drilling of torn out screw holes. If the hole is really big then you are looking at a "dutchman" patch.


2

I've never done this, but certainly I can think of occasions where I have seen this kind of water damage on particle board furniture in kitchens. I would consider waterproofing it by using a glue that will form a plastic-like layer to cover the exposed edges. PVA will work and is cheap and easy to apply, but isn't very hard wearing. An epoxy resin is a ...


2

The backboard is part of the anti-racking structure and very much needed and used by just about every closet. Backboard where the nails where pulled through can be reused a few times by putting the nails into new holes. At least until the edge is too chewed up. As for replacement you can take a chunk of the board with you.


2

The short answer is that you can use almost anything solid with a few caveats: Whatever you lay over it needs to be able to span any voids you leave. If you fill with solid plywood, that's not a concern. If you use something else as sleepers, your underlayment needs to be able to carry typical floor loads across the gaps. If you use sleepers and gaps, be ...


1

This is a great time to upgrade to a better material. Ikea's backboards are the cheapest thing they can possibly use. You could use a variety of hardboards, luaun plywood (which you stain to suit first) or even a clear or translucent polycarbonate and backlight it.


1

It would help to know exactly what you want to accomplish because there's likely a better finishing method than stain in your situation. A good first step is a paste wood filler to smooth out the surface imperfections. You may need to shop around a bit or online, and it's helpful to decide on a finish first. Paint is the easiest solution, any you have some ...


1

Your best bet might be to move the hinge above the damage and use a wood filler to fill the damaged area. Wood filler and or glue will not be strong enough to hold the hinge to the particle board for a permanent fix.


1

I'm with Lawrence on this, where there is blame, there is a claim. If you want to have a go at fixing however then go to a ships chandler and get a good glue from them. However, the trick is to clamp the pieces tight. I don't mean but some books on it but use something that has a vice-like grip spread over 3 or 4 inches. All that said, if this is an area not ...


1

It's fluctuating humidity, combined with the disposable nature of IKEA furniture (As @DA01 said in a comment "You don't really 'fix' IKEA furniture--at least not the stuff made out of MDF and particle board."). Your only option is to use exterior wood glue and clamp from the outside, probably using straps wrapped all the way around the table. I fixed a ...


1

Pine. It is the the only one of the choices (other than plywood) that will give a natural wood finish easily. Also its edges do not need special treatment, unlike plywood. While veneer makes all of the other choices feasible for finish, that is a complex process on a multifaceted model. Every face and visible edge needs to be precisely laminated. Pine is ...


1

The purpose of the solvent is to not remove but redistribute the stain that is already applied, although it will remove some of it. It will not remove what has penetrated into the grain of the wood, but it will lighten it. The solvent may even push it deeper into the grain, and that is ok too. You can sand your project at this point, the scratches will ...


1

I would carefully consider the full cost of the job as opposed to just looking at the cost for the underlayment material. In the complete analysis how does the cost of the underlayment compare to the cost of the flooring itself? The total cost of the project also needs to consider the potential future cost of ripping out substandard materials for later ...


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