4

I would typically assign something like this to an interior trim carpenter, but it depends a lot on the quality of their work. In my experience I would avoid the painting company that also does trim. They are fine for baseboard and crown, but for this job I would want the interior trim carpenter that does built in entertainment center cabinets, ...


3

Yes. Nails, cuts, and handling scuffs. They all should be painted over after installation for the best appearance. Paint cuts that won't be accessible or sealed with caulk before installation, but wait with everything else.


3

If the thing you are mounting is wide (like a shelf or TV) it will cover a few small test holes. Drill a small hole through the board and lathe-and-plaster, then force a piece of bent wire through the hole into the void. The wire should have two right angle bends, one that goes inside the wall void and one that stays outside. The bit inside the wall must ...


2

Try sweeping a small neodymium magnet all over the area you're searching. It might stick to any nails which (hopefully) secure the boards to the studs.


2

I work in a mill and I have talked to the graders to better understand how the wood is graded. First is clear this is the toughest grade as any knots are usually small and tight. But then you chose D grade this is the bottom of the barrel grade but visual defects, boards with some edge defects from bark “wain” (not sure on spelling) are common in D so it is ...


2

If it is all 1/8" then you could get 1/8th sheet of plywood from the big box stores, cut it to size and then cover it. Personally, I'd just rip it off and continue with the drywall. Unless you plan on sanding or chewing on the lead paint panels I think you are fine.


2

It is not necessary. Generally speaking, taping is done entirely for aesthetic reasons (where a firewall isn't needed).


2

Pre-painting makes perfect sense. Skilled painters can paint in place, but this is a nightmare for the less skilled and less experienced. Many wall surface products now come painted from the factory. They are installed, and then there is only touch-up painting. There is now nail hole filler colored to match the paint. Personally, I think Simpson stainless ...


2

Not termites , may be something called "powder post beetles" ( which I have never seen). Carpenter ants leave coarser sawdust. You should check it out.


1

You definitely need to see what is going on behind that panelling. If you can't take out a section (from either side) right now, then consider drilling a hole and using an endoscope camera fitted to your laptop or smart phone, they are available for a few bucks these days. Agree with Peter above, water usually plays a role in this story somewhere. My ...


1

How thick is that paneling likely to be? No one here can make that assessment for you; you will need to inspect the wall, by either drilling a hole at the intended mounting site, or opening the wall up. Is that same double-thickness situation (which looks like plaster over drywall, or maybe two layers of plaster) likely to be under the paneling? Again, ...


1

I don't think you really have plywood there. It looks like some OSB type mix with with a veneer - these were super popular in the 60s-80s. With the veneer off I am afraid that painting it or anything else is going to look bad and not last. Cardboard doesn't hold paint well. Since it is a laundry I would go with wainscoting. They make some super ...


1

Here is what you need to do: Find two vertical studs, that is all you need TWO... Get a nice rectangular piece of poplar or oak (maybe 2by2 or 2by3 depending on the size of the TV; the idea is to make this an anchor for the TV). Affix this piece of board to the studs with 3 inch nails or screws around the location where you intend to hang the TV. (optional)...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible