New answers tagged

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Everyone has already noted in the comments how and why MDF is not a good material to use around water or moisture and that you'll likely have future issues so that is not addressed in this answer. This answer is for the case that you still wish to go forward with your work, perhaps as a temporary fix. Can I just use any undercoat and paint it with any ...


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One of the things that happens during home renovations is the DIYer in the house (raising my hand as guilty) is cautious of creating a snowstorm of mud (joint compound) that is sanded off. This leads to trying to use thin layers of mud which means less sanding. While our intentions are good this leads to tape jobs sticking out, edges not feathered enough, ...


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Absolutely you can skim. (Lots of people deliberately prime in order to see the defects that might not be obvious.) If you can, use topping mud, which will sand more easily and give a better feathered edge than all purpose mud.


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This needs proper taping or it's likely to crack on the joint. Lay two strips of standard tape in a thin bed of joint compound and let it dry. Then skim wide and flat with a second coat. Evaluate the situation when that dries, and skim again if necessary. Standard advice: Very little sanding should be necessary. Skim thinly with firm pressure to achieve a ...


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When I poke pull holes I do similar, 200 grit paper will knock the ridges or a sanding sponge, once the ridges are down skim coat or the paper will probably show, a wide taping knife and some pre mixed mud skimmed on will work let dry and sand then get a can of spray texture and try to match , do not use tape to block off an area as the tape will produce a ...


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That electrician was no plasterer. First you need to get rid of the high spots where the paper part of the drywall is showing through, you might need to cut that out with a knife. after that you just need to fill it with plaster filler until it's flat then sand it smooth and paint. If you light it at an extreme angle the high spots will be easily visible. ...


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It's some sort of rust preventative, possibly fish oil, fish oil will evetually set like varnish (it can take several weeks to set in warm weather) but while tacky can be cleaned off using white spirit, or possibly grease remover. caustic soda solution will remove it too. caustic soda relatively cheap, not technically toxic, but is very corrosive and a ...


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Propane can reach temps well over 2000f as far as a stove top burner you might be right on the edge as the mixture is not as well mixed as a “turbo torch” that uses propane and air . We used the same coating in light blue for a quad header and it held up ok until we sold it. So it may be worth a try , I have never put a thermocouple in the flame.


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Slow... but low toxicity Leave the pipe outside until it's nice and rusty. Then remove the rust by electrolysis (washing soda or baking soda in water work for an electrolyte.) This happens to leave a pretty grayish "clean" surface, IF you rinse with hot water and immediately dry it (leave it sitting around wet and it will re-rust.) It's possible that you ...


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It is "mill varnish" , nothing to do with mill scale. I find no definition in the ASTM index. Very likely it is a varnish ; A resin plus a solvent/vehicle. Mineral spirits or gasoline should take it off. Different mills may use different products as there is no firm definition. It is applied to new , relatively scale free pipe. A industrial purchaser does ...


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Mill scale is the iron interacting with air while the metal is very hot. It's almost one and the same as the surface rather than a coating on it. The problem is removing it without removing the steel underneath Grinding with a different disks will work, as will a steel brush, or sandpaper. The easiest is probably using muriatic acid. It's cheap at about $...


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Welcome and nice first post You look good. Occurring to 3M a positive will have a distinct red color right away. The test also is not colorless, I personally think for the user to tell where it has been applied and that something is indeed being put on the paint surface Here is a video about it from 3M


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"Liquid Sand Paper" is a diluted form of the solvent used in gloss paints in the first place, Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DEG monobutyl ether). It also contains fine grains of silica (quartz) in suspension. It works by slightly dissolving the surface of the gloss paint and allowing the silica grains to embed themselves in it, which then allows the ...


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Sometimes this can be a cheap roller. But wubba-wubba-wubba application usually means one of two things: When you re-wetted the roller, you did not roll it all the way through/evenly, or did not wring it out evenly. This is highly sensitive to attention and sensitivity, which is what makes it a craft. Not least if the roller is imbalanced it will ...


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As some have said cheap can be a problem, are you loading the roller with paint evenly and working it on the cross hatched section of the pan? I will roll into the paint lift and back up roll into the paint 3 or 4 times depending on how full the tray is. After loading I roll on the crosshatching or ribbed section lift and roll to even out the load of paint ...


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If that uneven texture in the first photo is paint lifting up, then I don't believe it was caused by a missed area of mist coat. A severe reaction like that is more likely to be surface contamination under the paint or something wiped onto the wall after painting. It's interesting that the problem occurs on both adjacent faces. Maybe there is something ...


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I am not sure what a mist coat is but it looks like there was dust that kept the mud or paint from sticking. If you had used a skim coat of mud without cleaning the surface as it dries it can flake off. The same is true on top of the mud--if it's dusty the paint may stick to the dust and flake off when dry, so in both cases a good wipe down is needed to ...


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In the US "mineral spirits" are naptha , as in varnish and paint makers naptha ( somehow identified as V M & P) . It is similar to gasoline with low odor and no octane, etc. requirements. It could be called"paint thinner" but that name does not seem to be very specific.


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OK, you do not want to sand the cames if a lead solder was used. Since you probably don't know what type of solder was used, let's assume lead. Sanding it would introduce fine particles in the air and since lead it toxic, you don't want to breath it. Clean the cames with a household cleaner. You can scrub it with a toothbrush, just don't scrape it. Then ...


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In my honest opinion, I would not do a thing to them. Sanding will scratch up everything, paint will get on the glass, polishing will ruin the patina, besides the polishing agent will get around places that will be hard to get out, taking away from what you are trying to accomplish. Let alone, all these procedures making it possible to crack the glass


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On a home this old there will be layers of oil based paint and possibly additional layers of Latex paint. The biggest concern is good prep work (cleaning removing loose material) and a Quality paint. I have used both oil and latex on Victorian era homes with excellent results. It is really an opinion question today.


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