12

A primer is recommended for joint compound. Using a primer seals the mud and actually uses less paint with a even finish in the long run.


9

The codes are nice, and they're usually pretty close. But, especially at the retail level, it's not an exact science. There can be variations even between buckets in the same purchase. Based on advice from family who have worked as a painting contractors for decades... When you buy paint, make sure to get enough for the entire job in one go. Make sure ...


8

A darker color absorbs more heat so yes it will heat the home more during the day. Your concern is valid. White is the least absorbent color and black is the most absorbent color.


5

Paint first You will have fewer things to mask/protect and fewer critical edges to deal with and less stuff getting in the way. If you have large areas that you know will never be exposed, you can skip them - or paint them generally (e.g., roller but not brush edges; or primer only) but not worry about getting it "perfect".


4

I am very dubious of the possibility of "a perfect repair in terms of color". Perhaps you should be simply asking "How could I tint this epoxy repair paste?". You can use regular paint pigments to tint 2-part epoxies. Using a flat board as a pallette, stir up some dabs of paste and start adding small amounts of various pigments to each dab. When cured, ...


4

First, the human eye can distinguish millions of colors when they're laid right next to each other. However, in terms of seeing colors separately and trying to remember their matches, we are positively hopeless. Further, even small changes in light cause significant changes in perceived color even if you had a color sampling device, so cameras are as ...


4

I hate to tell you this, but you will have to either start over or make the stripes wider when you redo them. Unless you are some "gifted" artist, you aren't going to be able to free-hand those lines. The hardest part about your dilemma is the fact that the wall has a rough surface. It's going to be pretty hard to achieve a "perfectly" straight line. ...


4

If you find you're doing a lot of patches, buy some "new drywall" primer. It's cheaper and helps you get the new compound ready for paint just as well (it's also latex). It generally is only available in gallons, though (with the assumption you've done a whole room in drywall) If you're not doing a LOT of patches, consider using a better patch. Joint ...


4

Huh? Of course you will. Always. Anytime you put topcoat paint on a surface that is inconsistent, it will show inconsistent results. The topcoat will react differently to different surfaces, leaving a different texture that will be noticeable. That is the entire point of primer. You paint primer over the mixed surface, the primer seals it, and after 1-...


4

You obviously have to coat the bottom face of each lap. How you do that is at your discretion, but full-size rollers don't make it easy. You'd need a big, sloppy paint load to get good coverage, and this leads to dripping and splatter. I've traditionally used a brush for the undersides. Do that first, then roll over the brush marks on the vertical face. ...


3

I took the cans back to the store and asked for advice. Turns out, the two different colors (gold & brown) used two different base colors (stain & deep base vs. satin ultra deep base). I didn't realize it when I purchased the original cans of paint, because I just asked them to match specific colors. When I purchased the 2nd set of cans, I only ...


3

If you insulate your walls, you will thus be warmer during the summer and winter, and a black exterior would absorb sunlight and warm your house lightly. A white paint would reflect light and keep the outside of your house cooler.


3

There are two problems: Matching the original color This generally involves finding some documentation - which you say you don't have - of the original paint. That is not at all unusual. But if you could find that original color then you could go to a paint store and they could mix up a small container to match the same basic specification. Paint stores ...


3

The short answer is that filler isn't commonly used to repair the surface of a wood floor. It may be used to fill gaps between planks where shrinkage has occurred, or to repair holes drilled for wiring, etc., but floors are usually either sanded aggressively to remove all surface damage, or the damage is left as "character". You may be able to lightly ...


2

FWIW, I just talked to someone in the Austin, Texas Electric Distribution Department (Austin Utilities) and asked him about this. I am about to paint my house and I wanted to know if the utility company would turn off the power at the pole and what it would cost. He was a bit surprised at the question and said that people usually just paint around the ...


2

Most probably from temperature. Electromagnetic fields usually do not change plaster or color in that way. If your installation is old and plastered in, and undersized, the wires would beat up and the wall material would e.g. loose some Cristal water over time and thus change color. If you can verify your hypothesis with some metal or wire detector. If you ...


2

You do not need to strip all the existing paint off, though you can fairly easily with a chemical paint stripper if you want to. You need only to remove the shine from the existing paint; what I call de-glossing, to prepare it for a new paint coat. You should be able to use the 180 paper to accomplish this, but utilizing successively finer grit paper will ...


2

Yes it can be sprayed, and says so on the bucket. The spray tip orifice needs to be large though, because drylock is more like pudding. At least .025" which is bigger than the usual size used for latex paint.


2

I'm not familiar with a "roller" vs "brush" primer. The only thing I can assume here is that is that they're describing "new drywall" (example) vs normal primer (example), where the former is thinner and cheaper. New drywall is porous and tends to absorb more paint as a result. New drywall primer is a thinner primer designed to fill those gaps and nothing ...


2

It matters because a brush transfers more paint than a roller and leaves marks in the finish. By cutting in the edges first and following with the roller you spread the brushed on paint further leveling the finish while removing brush marks. In other words the rolled finish, which is what you want, goes as close to the corner as you can get without bumping. (...


2

Since you've reglazed, there aren't many options for re-clamping the corners, so... do repairs with a two part wood filler ("bondo" in North America). Regarding the primer, try to find out if it was latex or oil based putty (tip: if it dried fast, it was latex; if it can still be imprinted with your thumb after 3 weeks, it's oil), and match your primer to ...


2

Yes, the link you posted is for the Regal Select Exterior Revive. This product is made specifically for Vinyl Siding. It is designed to be buckle-resistant and no primer is needed. I painted houses professionally for 11 years and all I used were Benjamin Moore products. I have used this on vinyl shutters and it works exceptionally well. Benjamin Moore is ...


2

You should use mineral spirits or mythle-hydride to dilute oil based paints. I don't really think that diluting the primer is the best solution though. It would be best to lay it on thick with a heavily padded roller and then back roll it out. Primers job is to seal and adhere. Thinning it will only prevent it from doing its job.


2

First, is that wood or brick column? A simple solution is to scrap some paint off of the column and take it to a paint store or home improvement store, they have the means to check he pigments and match the color for you.


1

It sounds like someone has painted latex over an oil-based paint. One way to tell is cut out a small bubble, or scrape some of the top coat away (in an inconspicuous place) to reveal the underlying paint. Take a cloth and put some denatured alcohol on it. Rub the underlying paint for a few seconds and look at the cloth. If the cloth has the same color of ...


1

Take the two empty cans back to the store and ask them for a refund or replacement. Most big box stores offer satisfaction guarantees and will replace mismatched paint; the policy is designed for situations like what you're describing. Then, follow the excellent advice in the other answers: Buy the whole quantity you'll need right up front, versus buying ...


1

What you're actually seeing is the polyurethane that's been exposed has ambered ( turned yellowish ). Sadly, that's a byproduct of using oil based polyurethane. Now that the center is exposed it will eventually amber as well. If it really bothers you, you could try sanding the treads just enough to remove the existing finish. Just be careful not to sand ...


1

I wouldn't recommend using a bristle brush at all. Use either a foam brush or a lambskin applicator. I don't really see a reason to switch between the two, but it should be ok. Make sure you follow the manufacturers recommendations. You do not want to begin sanding until the solvents have evaporated and it begins curing. Also, time between coats has an ...


1

TSP stands for tri sodium phosphate . Anything not containing a lot of phosphate is not TSP ,so it can be anything. I would guess some kind of detergent. Detergents formerly contained significant amounts of TSP but now it is politically incorrect . So I get TSP and add a spoonful to the dishwasher for each load . It is also very useful as fertilizer in the ...


1

Don't paint "all" the corners, because most will dry before you get to them. Paint the corners first, as you go along, to maintain a wet edge. Also, when painting corners, feather the edge so you don't get a bump under the rolled paint.


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