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1

Yes, but it's not necessarily easy to do without specialist equipment. It's done by forensic document examiners and art historians. we can retrieve under-drawings below paintings by looking at them in infrared light. This is because the carbon used by artists to make their under-drawing absorbs light at that range of the spectrum ... Ultraviolet ...


0

Yes, that is normal with brushing that kind of trim. I had a door in a Victorian that drove me bananas for days. Just add a 3rd or 4th coat and don't give it any more thought. And be glad you're not painting lavender over deep purple lol! You could sand it gently, but I'd be VERY careful around edges and corners; it's easy to blow through all the layers ...


3

Yes, but you won’t like it... Had this before, and you have to remove the old paint back to a secure, stable layer. Think yourself lucky - we had to do it on the ceiling of a paper mill.. hundreds of square metres...


2

Ultraviolet light will degrade them (specifically the plastic that binds the fiberglass together into the "fiberglass reinforced plastic composite material" that we usually refer to as simply fiberglass) if you do not prime and paint, and then they will start shedding glass fiber (which does not degrade, but does make AWFUL splinters), which is a horrid mess ...


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