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2-part epoxies mixed in the correct proportion are what is used on the interior of food cans, and in factory tanks which handle food grade materials. They cure quickly, because they don't need to interact with air or moisture to cure, which means they aren't curing slowly while air moves through the layer. Epoxies cure by interaction with each other, not ...


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In parts -- The smell from any paint or varnish is a result of outgassing. Leave the doors open and that should disappear in a week or less. If it doesn't, or the paint remains "tacky" then strip and redo with fresh paint. Unless you are storing foodstuffs unbagged, there's no direct contact between food and the drawers, so it's a nonissue. If you are ...


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That almost looks like a sprayed on primer and not "real" paint. Your best bet would be to get a small can of primer and roll it on the wall, feathering it in to the surrounding area. Good luck.


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I have had this issue before, usually I didn't prime the corner area well enough, and the drywall tape ends up being pulled up a bit, just the top layer, when im pulling off the blue painters tape. Best fix is to sand the area, apply some joint compound, let dry for a day or two, sand to feather it in, repeat as necessary. Then prime and paint to match. ...


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You should give those last two coats of paint a good long while to see if it will get less tacky and "cure". If it stays tacky I would not try to fix it by trying to plaster an incompatible product like polyurethane on top of the latex paint. This would be an especially big issue if the base paint was not fully cured and dried. In this case the best order ...


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LeakSeal, pruning seal, roof cement, or an outdoor epoxy finish would provide the most lasting durability. Each is prone to eventual failure though. If the entire thing is constructed of 2" thick wood, it would probably last a few years before rotting through left as-is. I know organic gardeners sometimes use normal 2*6s to build raised beds.


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You laid it on too thick, because nooks are tricky to paint for several reasons. This was greatly exacerbated by not using primer. Whenever the paint industry claims something, they mean it in a certain context. For instance I see a lot of brushes and rollers "for all paints". Yeah, they melt and come to pieces when I roll a marine LPU, because what ...


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As long as you properly flush the sprayer and hose with each use, you shouldn't have problems with switching. Ofc make sure your Graco sprayer says you can use oil-based products, some sprayers have internal parts that don't handle those solvents well (most Graco sprayers do support use with oil-based products, and maybe all do - but it's wise to verify). ...


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From personal experience (spent two summers in college as an Industrial Painter) here are a couple things I learnt about your question. Oil paints can break down latex, which in your current situation is a good thing as it would help clear out the lines. However, if you were to switch back to latex down the road, it could be detrimental as there is always ...


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If you want to switch back and forth between oil and latex products, it is best to have a separate hose for each (as per Graco). Graco sprayers, hoses, guns, etc, are designed to be compatible with all of these types of fluids. There are a few other considerations that you should be aware of. Be sure that all equipment is of sufficient size and of ...


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Might be caused by the second layer shrinking beneath the third layer because it hadn't fully dried. In high humidity conditions, I generally increase the recommended drying time between recoats by 25%, just to be safe. Alternatively, if the backside of the door has been stripped and hasn't been resealed, the door itself may be expanding slightly due to the ...


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Sounds like either the liquid sander didn't, or the liquid sander is leaving a residue which is interfering with bonding with the new primer. I have never heard of a "liquid sander", and I would expect the recoating industry would jump all over that if it works. So I suspect it is "snake oil". But I mostly paint over alkyds (oil paints), maybe it only ...


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First, are the products chemically compatible? The mere fact that they're water-based does not make it so. The best place to ask is the factory. However, there's a bigger problem. Even if they're compatible, a colored paint diluted (what, 2:1?) with a clear coating will have very poor coverage. If it's going to take 6 coats to get decent coverage on ...


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you can add pigment to the paint ("sealer"). Oxide pigments are sold for tinting cement but also work on paint. In fact this is the same stuff paint manufacturers use to colour their paint. Or you could take it to a paint shop and ask them to tint it for you... a clear paint will need a lot of tint to make it opaque and will be diluted by the liquid part ...


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As far as UV resistance, you're in luck. Multiple coatings stack, so the silver coating you'll be overtopping will still be 100% effective on whatever UV (if any) gets through your next layers. As far as reflective insulation, you have one choice: White with a 90%+ albedo. If your hope is to both have the roof reflect solar heat and also present multi-...


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Texture differences are hard to fix. A quick solution is to add a layer of 1/4 inch drywall. Prime and paint as usual.


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