28

These are consumables You wouldn't worry about reusing a rubber glove or a paper towel. If it's pristine, sure... But generally you don't expect to. That roller cover is $3, the hot dog is $1 and the brush is $2. Stannius makes a good point about buying a quality brush and taking care of it. That idea actually harkens back to the age when ...


26

Given the high likelihood of lead based paint, I would not under your current circumstances attack this with a grinder or a sander. You'll create lead-contaminated dust which will haunt you for a long time. Doubly so if any children come into contact with your house. EPA pamphlet here: EPA RRP So, it would seem that you can either remove and replace the ...


23

Is lead really there? First and foremost, check your assumption about the presence of lead. Lead appears in 2 places: certain bold pigments like orange and red lead oxides (not that yellow chromium is particularly healthy) Second, it appears as a cheap pigment called "white lead", used in cheap paints. (better paints used what they still use, titanium ...


20

Just some sand paper will be fine. You don't want to use a chemical stripper as it may interact poorly with the copper.


14

OK, so this is a classic prep-paint situation, on a metal thing which has alkyd (that's what its mom calls oil paint when it's in trouble) or possibly LPU paint. Definitely not latex, so we dodged that bullet. shudder Latex paints are not for metal equipment like this. They will fail very quickly. However alkyds are very stinky. If you can't paint ...


11

You don't need to go to bare metal on paint that is well adhered. Hammerite has a particular "look" (a deliberately uneven, uniformly) surface which can help to hide surface defects under it - if that look is what you want. It's a common machine tool or toolbox finish - less of a common choice for the living room. But if you look at some and like it, that ...


7

I think you're going to be much less frustrated if you just buy a new roller brush. Those are meant to be disposable and not to be stored for long periods. You can get away with short term re-use by wrapping them in a plastic bag and freezing them overnight but once the paint has set and cured, its done.


7

I sympathise with you your situation. I am sure that most of us have started a job that has become a lot tougher than anticipated with no easy way back. I know I have. Try a different paint stripper. I found that some work better than others and some work better with certain types of paint. Shop around on websites specialising in painting or wood finishing ...


6

I would put a wood frame around/over it then cover the frame with a hardboard then decorate that. Many times that an internal framed wall has been removed to find things behind.


5

Stop guessing if there's lead I bought a mid-1970s house right on the edge of where lead paint was banned. We had some older windows, so I bought a lead test kit and made certain there was no lead. The kit wasn't terribly expensive, the results are guaranteed and it's easy to use (100% DIY). If the test comes back negative, sand that sucker down (200+ grit, ...


4

That looks like a good justification for a phone call to the local sandblaster. Stucco's too abrasive to be depainted with metal tools.


4

I would remove the affected parts from the door and wall and drop them in a small container which can be a) placed outdoors (for fume abatement) and, b) have paint thinner or Goof Off to soak for minutes or hours. Except for possible varnish finishes on the hardware, paint thinner has no effect on brass, stainless steel, etc.


3

You can try with soapy water. But - having removed a lot of paint, what you're hoping for is probably impossible. Even if you get the glow-in-the-dark stuff off, doing so will roughen up the underlying paint to the point that repainting is necessary. You are stuck repainting, the question is whether you'd rather DIY or pay the landlord to do it. First,...


3

I have just recently done this. I had some 90+ year old doors with so many coats of paint on the hardware that the doorknob would not even turn. The ball ends of the hinge pins looked like mini onion domes. I used a basic cheap heat gun to loosen the paint and then a combination of brushes and scrapers to clean everything up. I did not care about ...


3

The "original" color doesn't exist Actual pipe color is not what you think. Naked pipe is very dingy gray that quickly turns rust red. The pipe you see in buildings is Sched 40 water pipe and it is silver/gray. Your sprinkler pipe is Sched 80, which comes from the factory painted black. Looks like gas pipe. Larger fittings are typically red. Example....


3

If the paint is in good condition, with no chips, peeling unsightly blemishes I would repaint. It would be a lot of work to get the pipes really clean. Any exposed thread at the fittings will be tough to strip You will need to scuff the old finish to promote adhesion. Pick a metal color. Rustoleum has colors like Bare cast iron, nickel, brass etc. You could ...


3

Locate the studs on either side of the area affected. Cut down the middle of the studs, and horizontally above and below the affected area. Remove drywall and bad paint. Insert new drywall Mud/feather/etc as per usual for patching Paint.


3

Don't waste your time. Trying to prevent a ladder from being covered in paint is like trying to keep a war hero's uniform from getting covered in medals. Exactly like that, in fact. Paint stains means the ladder has been doing useful work. When did that fall out of fashion? Assuming it is latex paint, your best bet is to catch it right away with ...


3

That's an interesting tactic. You may be able to mask things off and use paint stripper to clean up the latch area in place. Otherwise, take the hardware apart and soak it clean. Lubricate as appropriate and reinstall.


3

Rip out and replace the wainscoting. Wainscoting generally comes pre-primed. For a little more at a better lumber yard, you can get a true plywood panel. The big box stores will have MDF, which is much less durable. You might be able to compel the contractor to do this.... but given the story above, you probably don't want them doing it.


3

Based on what I've seen in the pictures I'd say you have two option: 1) get a sander and sand the entire deck or 2) get two gallons of stain remover and spray in on the entire deck and scrape it all off. Deck stains are most durable when applied to wood and coating new stain over bare wood and then wood with old stain won't give you the results you want. ...


3

Grab a sander or grinder, and wet sand it. It'll be a 2-man job, one of you sanding, one constantly wetting. If you've got a plant sprayer or similar (the ones you pump to pressurise), that'll make applying consistent water easier. You want enough water to keep the dust down, but not too much to annoy your tools. A good quality one will be more tolerant of ...


3

If this is a personal project and the cabinet will not be on display in a public location at your business or something, I would recommend listening to the advice from the pros at the paint shop. The "pro" support at Home Depot (or equivalent advisor) is employed by the biggest A-Z home improvement supplier; they give good advice and if you end up using (...


3

remove loose/flaky/unsound existing paint and all rust/corrosion by scraping/wire-brushing/sanding sand smooth to desired level of appearance, de-gloss any glossy painted areas. NOTE- there is no need to remove all existing paint. Sand existing surfaces to the level of appearance needed. If you spend time sanding completely smooth then that will improve the ...


2

USG All Purpose joint compound sticks to shiny surfaces. you have to lightly sand the wall first only to prevent bubbling. All Purpose compound has glue in it. It stuck perfectly to my semi-gloss walls. I know this post is old but if anyone else comes by I wanted them to know. I got my information directly from USG


2

I asked a couple of sandblasters and they all told me that sandblasting off the paint would likely destroy the stucco in the process, so I would probably need a new brown coat and color coat after they were finished. In the end, the cheapest real stucco option (i.e. not just adding another layer pf paint) seemed to be to skip sandblasting and apply wire ...


2

Painting is easy - preparing for a new coat of paint so it will last is the hard work. You should scrape off all loose or peeling paint - otherwise the new paint will simply peel right off there. Only after that should you move to spackle and sanding to prepare the base for new paint. On wood items "putty" is preferred over "spackle" which is more of a ...


2

Rent a drum sander and run it in line with the boards. You can take off a large amount of wood in short order depending on the grit of paper you use. Then use a sanding disc with a backer on a grinder for detail work where the drum will not go. We used 36 grit to bring some weathered wood back; probably took of over 1/4" off the top in that case! Total ...


2

What I've done in the past is to put the hinges into an old crock pot and let them "cook" for a few hours in just plain water. This will heat the metal to a point where the paint should come off. A little elbow grease and maybe a stiff plastic bristly brush should help get the rest of the paint off. I've also used wooden skewers to help scrape off the paint ...


2

Paint strippers good for oil paints are readily available. One popular one is called "Aircraft remover". It will go after alkyd enamels and lacquer paints quite effectively if used as directed. Don't assume the paint is "oil based" merely because it is not latex based. There are some much more durable coatings out there, most of them 2-part like an ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible