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19

Mount a board on the wall and then mount the screen on the board. Get an 8 foot cedar or pressure treated 2x6, you can then use timber screws to mount it to the wall insuring you hit the studs. You will need to pre-drill both the 2x6 and the cement siding, the hole in the siding should be as big as the screw and the hole in the board should be just smaller ...


9

Voltage drop is additive or you might say cumulative. If you use a heavy wire for the long portion, and small wire for the short sections, you'd prevent most of the voltage drop. Your concern about your electronics may be unfounded; most of your electronics will run off a power supply that handles a wide range of voltages, and voltage drop will be no ...


7

I've dealt with this issue by using chains (although, not outdoors, and it was a more permanent installation, so I didn't have to keep hanging & removing it). Basically, you attach brackets at the studs as high as you can, and attach chains to them. You then attach the screen to the end of the chains. You want the brackets to be as high up as possible,...


6

"convert to GFCI" is a fine way to resolve the depth problem. So is covering the route with more dirt. You need 18" of cover over the top of the pipe. You can always use larger wire. If Code requires #12, you can use #8, #2 or 2000kcmil if that's what you happen to have lying around. If that wire will not attach to a receptacle, easy peasy - Pigtail ...


5

+1 option #4, plastic standoffs. "Any thoughts on the most robust way to anchor the posts?" You said you are renting and can not anchor. Take some five gallon buckets and mix up some cement, fill the buckets with the cement and put an eye bolt in so it stick out of the top. Put a nut and washer on the threaded part of the eye bolt that will be in the ...


4

You need a box in that location , an "old work" box can be placed into the hole and it will provide the mounts for the fixture. Old work boxes have tabs or wings that anchor to the back side of the wall.


4

Two-prong splitters are not hard to find. Expand your search to big box stores or online retailers. You can also use the ubiquitous 3-to-2 adapter (cheater plug): This adapter is safe to use in this case because of the GFCI outlet. However, if you're in a pinch, just break off the ground prong on that green splitter and plug the ground holes on the ...


4

Depends. I use substantial amounts of chipped wood in my tree farm operation. I find that I like to wear gloves working with it because the ends are sharp, and it's a source of splinters. It's painful to walk on barefoot. If you use it as garden mulch, it should be composted for about 3 months first. Pine in particular is loaded with terpenes which is ...


4

It's a pain in the neck but you need to remove and dispose of the carpet. Anything you put on top of it will only cover a nasty mess that will get worse over time. Once the carpet is removed you will need to clean the cement of carpet glue. There are many videos and guides for how to remove carpet glue. Once the cement is prepped you have options. The ...


4

While the non-rated glazing panel may or may not be OK here, I would shy away from it myself While 2016 CalRC R302.5.1 (similar to 2015 IRC R302.5.1) does not require a fire-rated door for house-to-garage doors, it does require a solid wood or honeycomb-core steel door in such an application if a fire-rated door is not used and the house is not sprinklered: ...


3

If the outlet, does not have test and reset buttons, it is clearly not a GFCI itself. However, it is possible that another outlet or circuit-breaker in the line before it has been wired to protect that outlet, as well. No harm will be done testing a non-GFCI outlet using the GFCI tester, but if it does trigger an interrupter elsewhere, you'll need to locate ...


3

The "gfci" plug in testers put a resistor from the ground to hot in most cases to pull 6 ma of current this creates an imbalance that will trip every GFCI out there, if there is no ground the testers don't work. The no ground with the testers is more common on 2 wire upgrades that are protected by a gfci outlet in older homes to allow 3 wire outlets. In 78 ...


3

To keep rain and dirt off the glass an to offer a bit of shade? We have an Orangery with a wide cornice around the roof. It does a good job of sheltering the windows. It also stops a square. flat roffed building looking like a bunker. Our Orangery look crap until the cornice went on. Then it looked epic!


3

After further contemplation I suspect that we're discussing siding, not sheathing. The latter is installed over framing and under siding. Siding is probably plywood or pressed fiber hardboard. Most sheds (and indeed most homes) in my region are built using 7/16" (about 11mm) oriented strand board (OSB) wall sheathing underneath some sort of siding. This is ...


3

This is the remnants of a natural gas or propane grill, gas heater, or perhaps a gas lamp. The flared tubing fitting and old control valve stem are the giveaways here. Look around the structures adjacent to the yard for signs of a pipe with a valve for which you cannot ascertain a purpose, so you can at least try to confirm that any leftover fuel supply ...


3

Outlets protected by an upline GFCI require a GFCI Protected marking. Several stickers come with every GFCI device. You will never see a Code requirement for a GFCI receptacle. You can satisfy all Code requirements with GFCI+breaker combo devices, or plain GFCI (deadfront) devices. Putting a GFCI+receptacle combo device on a circuit already GFCI ...


3

This is a weird "unwritten requirement" Other than 406.4(D)(2)(b)/(c), which govern the use of GFCIs as retrofits when no equipment grounding conductor is present, there actually is no direct Code requirement for "GFCI Protected" labeling on protected receptacles "downstream" of the GFCI. Some inspectors, though, treat this as a 110.3(B) listing/...


3

Changes in conditions can kill equipment in environments like you're describing - especially involving high humidity. When the temperature falls at night, the moisture condenses on every available surface. The next day as the air heats back up, the moisture evaporates. If the day/night temperature swings are big enough to cause significant condensation, then ...


3

Glue can be pretty strong when you've got plenty of area (like there), although unless you've got some diagonal bracing, it's going to be wobbly whatever fixing you use. Most people don't use glue because it takes a while to dry, so you either run out of clamps after a couple of joints, or the clamps get in the way of the next thing. (by comparison you can ...


2

This will work fine, with these caveats: The posts will certainly be strong enough. The question is whether the soil surrounding their concrete bases will give, allowing the posts to tilt. Worst-case scenario you add guy wires down to the ground as support. Your primary (perimeter) wires should be 1/8" steel wire rope, at least, but light enough to not add ...


2

I know this thread is old but I found it because I'm having the same issue. I wanted to share what I found for a solution. Hope this helps anyone else out there. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00M16DANU


2

You're almost there, but not quite First off, matching breaker brand isn't quite enough to get you there, you need to use a breaker that your panel is labeled as compatible with (either via the loadcenter UL label or a labeling supplement provided with a classified breaker), as Square-D and Eaton (Siemens was this way too, but recent changes have ...


2

I see a number of choices: Remove the whole top half of the pole by separating at this joint and replacing that top half. You would drill new holes and mount the backboard brackets to the new pipe section. Find another piece of pipe that just slides inside of the two pieces. Secure in place using new drilled through holes and bolts. You already have to ...


2

Those 3-lamp "magic 8-ball" testers are pretty lame, but in two ways. the legends, like "hot-ground reverse" or "no hot". They are more useless than a magic 8-ball, because they are wildly speculating at the most likely (easy) cause in the context of new construction. They are wholly unprepared for the realities of maintaining old wiring, and their wrong ...


2

The mounting bracket is designed so that you can rotate the fixture, no matter how the outlet box is mounted. The mounting bracket screws hold the lower portion of the bracket securely in place. Before securing the lower portion, be sure to insert the longer fixture screws. They need to face outward so that you can secure the hex nuts to them. If you thread ...


2

Solution 1: Buried pipe I had this exact problem and had to remedy it with buried drainage pipe. I put in a surface drain at the lowest spot in the back yard that catches most of the surface runoff, and then hooked up about 30' of perforated corex pipe from the surface drain box to other swampy areas that were slightly higher. From the surface drain I ran ...


2

When you turn the water off does it dribble for a few seconds like a 6 or 8" pipe back in the wall. The absolute way would be to pull the valve stem but this requires turning the water off. Looking at your faucet it is a frost free. The valve seat is usually inside the wall with the supply pipe, this is how I have seen and plumbed them. Makes a hell of a ...


2

Since you are planning on using PVC conduit (this is different than PVC pipe) I would use thwn wire, (most thhn wire is dual rated as thwn or for use in a damp wet location). You would run your conduit to each fixture and daisy chain all the fixtures. I have seen folks run 1 pipe up and 1 back down to make the wire pull easier but I just use a T and 1 pipe ...


2

A few specific points: Use existing outdoor GFCI Because this is outdoors, it needs to be GFCI protected if there are any receptacles in the circuit outdoors. As noted by Harper, a circuit used only for lighting does not necessarily need GFCI protection. But the original question mentions a receptacle, so we'll consider GFCI to be a requirement. If you can ...


2

Hubs are not a thing in mains electrical wiring. All your splices need to be inside junction boxes, and those junction box covers need to be accessible without tools. You can't bury them, for instance. Realistically you will probably need to bring conduit up to each pole base, going from pole to pole, and make the splices inside the pole base. Most poles ...


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