Hot answers tagged

2

Pressure treated will last significantly longer. Hemlock performs about the same as Southern Pine and its above ground life is significantly less than treated pine’s in ground life. In ground, you can’t expect untreated wood to last more than 3-5 years. In ground, I think you can reasonably expect pressure treated to last six times longer (even more if you ...


2

A bunch of pieces of concrete will always be a bunch of pieces of concrete, any jointing compound that's weaker than the reinforcing bars in the concrete is at best temporary. Pavers can hide a multitude of sins.


1

Use a mounting block with a built-in box The simplest solution to this problem is to use a siding mounting block with a builtin pancake box, such as an Arlington 8141 (the correct part number depends on the lap depth of your siding, the 8141 is what's used with a 1/2" lap) or equivalent.


1

Your profile says Seattle. The weathering of the wood says that you get a fair amount of water. That slab is too high relative to your siding and probably the threshold of your door. Modern code says 4" from top of slab to top of impermeable layer. If you are keeping the house for more than 10 years, I'd ditch the slab, set the grade to the correct ...


1

A hairline crack? which also burns gas? So you should STOP using this at once, it is NOT safe. Get it repaired by a competent person.


1

I have not used hemlock but I have repaired decks that were made of it. I would definitely go with the PT. Just make sure you specify that the PT will have ground contact. From a lot of personal experience, I'd go with stainless steel screws for planking, galvanized bolts for framing and avoid sinking posts in concrete unless you wrap them in plastic. Good ...


1

It is a personal preference to seal or not to seal. I have sand stone night stands. When we purchased I sealed incase I knock a cup of coffee over or spill something that would stain the surface I don’t want it looking bad. Yes things have spilled and they still look good. Another possible reason for sealing outside work is if it freezes hard. At my current ...


1

Sounds like a place for a motorized retractable awning. These can be fitted with a variety of fabrics, including a sun mesh. The mesh filters sunlight and on a slope sheds most of the water. Or get fancy and install two motorized awnings: one for shade the other for rain.


1

Sunlight, no. "Breathable", yes. That's what "Gore-tex" fabric is famous for. They were the first / biggest, but now many other suppliers have released similar breathable waterproof fabrics made from PTFE (a.k.a. "teflon") fibers. I don't think however that Gore-tex makes anything clear or even opaque. And go get a second mortgage on your house if you want ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible