33

Three things: Yes, you were supposed to apply a primer. Fresh joint compound and drywall soak up paint like crazy. The primer serves to seal the joint compound and drywall and create a consistent surface. However, you've already painted - and the paint will do the same thing - just not as effectively and you'll probably need to do a third coat. Paint ...


6

The paint likely does not match perfectly, either in color or in amount of gloss. Those color matching machines can be hit or miss... If it bothers you - paint the entire wall with the new paint and you’ll never notice the slight difference in color.


6

If you're set on using rollers, the one for the cabinet, short hair one, will be fine. Have you considered spraying? I would use a short hair one for the walls too unless you have heavy texturing. Long hair rollers suck up a lot of paint and when applying it to the wall, it creates suction which can pull existing old paint off the wall if you keep going over ...


6

There's no hair on a paint roller. It's called nap, and it's described by depth. 1/4" nap is commonly used for smooth walls. 3/8" or 1/2" nap is for more heavily textured surfaces. In your case, the nap is 4mm (about 3/16"). You want a very short nap for smooth surfaces. 4mm nap may still be too much unless you want some stipple. Consider ...


5

I had that same problem (oil based paint too glossy). 000 steel wool worked, sanding worked, tsp had no effect, vinegar had no effect. I mixed some talc (baby powder) with my oil based high gloss paint and was able to get the flat appearance I wanted. I found that it took a ratio of about 6 parts paint to 1 part talc to get the desired result


5

You can coat it with a satin clear finish. or even a matte finish. Both are available at most paint stores and big box stores.


5

I would not paint the copper. If you ever need to repair it, paint would be one more problem on making a good leak free connection. If you want to cover the pipe, use foam. Remember, copper water supply’s are quite common direct burial, the sun and elements won’t hurt it. I suggest insulation, if in a location that the temps drop below 27°F. (Yes water ...


4

Painting over a glossy oil paint is indeed different than painting over an oil primer. I just came from a customers's home where the seller did the former - you can literally pull sheets of the paint off the trim. Maybe there are better latex paints that tend to adhere more strongly and you can get away with putting them over oil, but I'd never do it. Don'...


4

I've been prejudiced toward oil based polys for years, but having used water based polys on some projects that weren't all the important, I've been impressed. Water based is much less toxic, easier to clean up, more environmentally friendly and actually does a pretty good job. Seems to dry quicker and more solidly than oil based. It also seems to sand ...


3

For the best possible results, just go buy the same paint in a less glossy firm and repaint the wall. All the other solutions will take as much time and still might not give the results you want. Save time and effort and just repaint.


3

The 2 answers you have amount to (i) roughen it, and (ii) satin/matte varnish it. I suggest doing both. When you're applying one finish on top of another, neither of which is primer/undercoat, you need a good key -- hence roughening the surface. You don't want to create visible scratches though. At some point you want to leave it in a warm place for a ...


3

Use steel wool or plastic abrasive pads on it (after it's dried.) There are also "paint flattening agents" if you are looking for a chemical/additive fix for another coat.


3

After staining give a coat of clear finish, sanding it with a fine sandpaper (400G) to remove any raised grain or any dust that may have settled onto the drying finish. This will give you a good base to add your paint and the sanded surface will give it good adhesion. Steel wool has its purpose, but I would not use it here. That's only my opinion. My ...


3

I just had the same problem with latex paint peeling off the interior of my front door. The hardest part was removing the latex paint. I discovered that the best way to remove it was to apply tape and pull it off rather than sand. It was somewhat time consuming but it sure took it off. Edited to add every kind of tape worked, packing, scotch type, duct, ...


3

Latex paint should never be painted straight onto oil paint. In this case you'll need to remove as much of the new paint as possible. Then you can use a water based primer with an adhesive like Gripper from Glidden. There are other brands of course, but an adhesive based primer will stay on oil paint or other surfaces that water based latex paint would ...


2

I would sand all the baseboard that is peeling, wipe clean for sanding dust. Then prime it all, using a strong water based primer. Zinser 123 is good. Then re paint it using a water based paint that is 100% acrylic . Not just latex or vinyl latex. Make sure it's 100% acrylic and you'll have no problems.


2

This is all bad, I am sorry to say. This is the result of poor surface preparation (sanding) prior to the application of the paint that is peeling. There is no easy solution, you must remove all the peeling paint along with any that even might peel. Sanding with coarse paper (maybe a heat gun but be careful) is the likely solution. On top of that, you will ...


2

TSP has been used by painters for many years to "de-gloss" paint. I have used it to both flatten a painted rooms glossy look, as well as to provide a surface that a new top coat can adhere to. Gloss enamel needs to be cut (a surface tooth) established for new paint to adhere. If you do not provide a tooth for new paint it can peel off of glossy enamel (a ...


2

You should be able to test the paint for lead content using one of the lead-test kits you can pick up at Home Depot or Walmart. Especially if the oil-based sub-layer is exposed in places. If the first test proves negative it's worth scuffing the paint with some sandpaper and testing again, just to be sure. If it's lead-free you're home free. Depending on ...


2

They're are insecticides that will keep these flying drill bits from nesting in your eaves. The ones I know of need to be applied by a pro but seem to be good for multiple years.


2

The best suggestion is to read the manufacturers instructions on usage. This information is often printed on the paint container label. You can also check at the manufacturers web site and look up the particular type of paint you are using. For example: http://www.kilz.com/products/primer/kilz-complete Click on the "PREPARATION, APPLICATION & CLEAN-UP" ...


2

Paint strippers good for oil paints are readily available. One popular one is called "Aircraft remover". It will go after alkyd enamels and lacquer paints quite effectively if used as directed. Don't assume the paint is "oil based" merely because it is not latex based. There are some much more durable coatings out there, most of them 2-part like an ...


2

If you want another alternative to painting and the copper is bright and brand new. On top of that it has no existing soldered joints, you could apply soldering flux over the whole thing and melt a coat of lead or solder over it with a torch and bar solder You may be able to find solid lead bars too, they have a lower melting point than 50-50 solder


2

You are way overthinking this. First, ever hear of companies doing chrome plating? Yes. Zinc plating (galvanizing)? Yes. Aluminum plating? No. And there's a reason for that! Aluminum corrodes horribly in the weather, it would be somewhat less desirable than manure plating. Just buy cold galvanizing compound. It is paint that's over 90% zinc, designed ...


2

A stripper gel is worth a shot. Never tried myself. I'd definitely use a heavy duty respirator with that stuff. A big no way on the pressure washer ;). You might also try contoured sanding pads. I use these all the time. Sanding just sucks and takes devotion.. http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2005237/10568/large-contour-sanding-pads-6-piece.aspx http://www....


2

A great many things will soften or dissolve latex paint without ravaging the underlying layer. The more fundamental problem is you will need a scuff-sand to get anything to bond to the old paint. Paint cannot bond to gloss, it needs to be microscopically rough, or visibly "flat". Scuff sand with a Scotchbrite "green" pad, same green/yellow sponges ...


2

In addition to other comments: If your wall has a texture to it, orange peel texture spray can help to make it more seamless. Applying it is an art. A little goes a long way and you need to get the spray pattern right. Definitely practice on an old board first on a wall you don't care about like in a basement. Feathering the edges into the surrounding ...


2

For oil-based paint, what you are looking for can be called a hardener, accelerator, catalyst, drier, and I'm sure other things. Paint (coatings) chemistry is complicated. With oil based paint, I find a more helpful mental model of the "drying" process is less the liquid drying/evaporating away, and more of a chemical reaction happening to make a polymer (...


2

Can I just sand down the first layer so the gloss paint is semi removed and then paint over it? YES - there is no need to sand all the way through the existing paint. You just need to de-gloss the paint and the new paint should stick fine. Concern- the fact that you repainted previously, without sanding, may cause one or more layers of old paint to start to ...


2

Because you used the word "vintage" I assume you care a little about the historic value and/or appearance of this, and while it's very much a matter of taste, I'd make a few recommendations: Water-based is much easier to work with and, unless it's for a floor, kitchen table, or such, I don't like using oil-based. Oil-based has a different look ...


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