33

Three things: Yes, you were supposed to apply a primer. Fresh joint compound and drywall soak up paint like crazy. The primer serves to seal the joint compound and drywall and create a consistent surface. However, you've already painted - and the paint will do the same thing - just not as effectively and you'll probably need to do a third coat. Paint ...


21

Enamel paints hold better, are MUCH harder than latex, and will stand up to a lot more abuse. You can also use harsher cleaning methods on them.


18

Latex paints won't bond properly to metal, it will flake, peel, and bubble off.


7

I think your best bet is to just paint over it/re-paint the wall. On exterior concrete/brick walls it is easy to power wash or sandblast it - the goal is to remove everything. However neither of these will work inside - aside from the mess they'd create, they'd probably take more then just the paint off your walls! You might find some chemicals to help ...


6

The paint likely does not match perfectly, either in color or in amount of gloss. Those color matching machines can be hit or miss... If it bothers you - paint the entire wall with the new paint and you’ll never notice the slight difference in color.


4

Painting over a glossy oil paint is indeed different than painting over an oil primer. I just came from a customers's home where the seller did the former - you can literally pull sheets of the paint off the trim. Maybe there are better latex paints that tend to adhere more strongly and you can get away with putting them over oil, but I'd never do it. Don'...


4

You can coat it with a satin clear finish. or even a matte finish. Both are available at most paint stores and big box stores.


4

For getting paint off a door, I highly recommend using Citrus Strip. We tried it on our old wooden door and it worked great, taking off multiple layers of paint. It doesn't work as well under a lot of sun and heat, so I would recommend either taking the door off the hinges or erecting some sort of tarp to block the sun from hitting it directly. Then get a ...


4

Steven's answer is pretty much the correct one. In the past, I've used the 3M magic eraser products. But that, like most chemical/mechanical removal ends up leaving a damaged area that looks just like the original graffiti. Your best bet is to repaint. When you do repaint, you can consider looking at anti graffiti coatings: http://www.sherwin-williams....


3

If you don't want to strip the new paint off, you can sand it to smooth out the rough areas. Go over it with a 150 grit first, then go over it a second time with 220 or 340. You can use a sanding sponge to get into the tight details. Be sure to clean it well after sanding, completely dust free this time. If possible, pull the hinge pins and remove the door....


3

Probably both temperature and thinning are an issue, since you are at the extremes for both (very high temperature, and no thinning at all), but there are a LOT of ways to get orange peel, so eliminating it can be a trial and error process. It sounds to me like the solvent is evaporating before the paint can flow together on the cabinets. This is usually ...


3

When I use oil based products I use disposable pan liners so cleanup means let it dry-up and throw it away. To clean brushes I use a brush spinner to remove as much material as possible. I swish the brush in a container of mineral spirits and brush a piece of dry cardboard to get out some more of the urethane. Finally I soak the brush for a couple of days in ...


3

I personally would use it, presuming I'm going to top-coat it with exterior paint. Of course, the very designation of the primer as "interior" means that the manufacturer did not INTEND for you to use it outdoors. So you're taking a chance. But I'd do it and not give it another thought. What's the potential downside? Probably something like "If it doesn'...


3

Use steel wool or plastic abrasive pads on it (after it's dried.) There are also "paint flattening agents" if you are looking for a chemical/additive fix for another coat.


3

After staining give a coat of clear finish, sanding it with a fine sandpaper (400G) to remove any raised grain or any dust that may have settled onto the drying finish. This will give you a good base to add your paint and the sanded surface will give it good adhesion. Steel wool has its purpose, but I would not use it here. That's only my opinion. My ...


3

I just had the same problem with latex paint peeling off the interior of my front door. The hardest part was removing the latex paint. I discovered that the best way to remove it was to apply tape and pull it off rather than sand. It was somewhat time consuming but it sure took it off. Edited to add every kind of tape worked, packing, scotch type, duct, ...


3

Latex paint should never be painted straight onto oil paint. In this case you'll need to remove as much of the new paint as possible. Then you can use a water based primer with an adhesive like Gripper from Glidden. There are other brands of course, but an adhesive based primer will stay on oil paint or other surfaces that water based latex paint would ...


2

I would sand all the baseboard that is peeling, wipe clean for sanding dust. Then prime it all, using a strong water based primer. Zinser 123 is good. Then re paint it using a water based paint that is 100% acrylic . Not just latex or vinyl latex. Make sure it's 100% acrylic and you'll have no problems.


2

This is all bad, I am sorry to say. This is the result of poor surface preparation (sanding) prior to the application of the paint that is peeling. There is no easy solution, you must remove all the peeling paint along with any that even might peel. Sanding with coarse paper (maybe a heat gun but be careful) is the likely solution. On top of that, you will ...


2

TSP has been used by painters for many years to "de-gloss" paint. I have used it to both flatten a painted rooms glossy look, as well as to provide a surface that a new top coat can adhere to. Gloss enamel needs to be cut (a surface tooth) established for new paint to adhere. If you do not provide a tooth for new paint it can peel off of glossy enamel (a ...


2

For the best possible results, just go buy the same paint in a less glossy firm and repaint the wall. All the other solutions will take as much time and still might not give the results you want. Save time and effort and just repaint.


2

The 2 answers you have amount to (i) roughen it, and (ii) satin/matte varnish it. I suggest doing both. When you're applying one finish on top of another, neither of which is primer/undercoat, you need a good key -- hence roughening the surface. You don't want to create visible scratches though. At some point you want to leave it in a warm place for a ...


2

You should be able to test the paint for lead content using one of the lead-test kits you can pick up at Home Depot or Walmart. Especially if the oil-based sub-layer is exposed in places. If the first test proves negative it's worth scuffing the paint with some sandpaper and testing again, just to be sure. If it's lead-free you're home free. Depending on ...


2

They're are insecticides that will keep these flying drill bits from nesting in your eaves. The ones I know of need to be applied by a pro but seem to be good for multiple years.


2

A stripper gel is worth a shot. Never tried myself. I'd definitely use a heavy duty respirator with that stuff. A big no way on the pressure washer ;). You might also try contoured sanding pads. I use these all the time. Sanding just sucks and takes devotion.. http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2005237/10568/large-contour-sanding-pads-6-piece.aspx http://www....


2

Paint strippers good for oil paints are readily available. One popular one is called "Aircraft remover". It will go after alkyd enamels and lacquer paints quite effectively if used as directed. Don't assume the paint is "oil based" merely because it is not latex based. There are some much more durable coatings out there, most of them 2-part like an ...


2

The best suggestion is to read the manufacturers instructions on usage. This information is often printed on the paint container label. You can also check at the manufacturers web site and look up the particular type of paint you are using. For example: http://www.kilz.com/products/primer/kilz-complete Click on the "PREPARATION, APPLICATION & CLEAN-UP" ...


2

A great many things will soften or dissolve latex paint without ravaging the underlying layer. The more fundamental problem is you will need a scuff-sand to get anything to bond to the old paint. Paint cannot bond to gloss, it needs to be microscopically rough, or visibly "flat". Scuff sand with a Scotchbrite "green" pad, same green/yellow sponges ...


2

You are way overthinking this. First, ever hear of companies doing chrome plating? Yes. Zinc plating (galvanizing)? Yes. Aluminum plating? No. And there's a reason for that! Aluminum corrodes horribly in the weather, it would be somewhat less desirable than manure plating. Just buy cold galvanizing compound. It is paint that's over 90% zinc, designed ...


2

If you want another alternative to painting and the copper is bright and brand new. On top of that it has no existing soldered joints, you could apply soldering flux over the whole thing and melt a coat of lead or solder over it with a torch and bar solder You may be able to find solid lead bars too, they have a lower melting point than 50-50 solder


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