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20

You should always be concerned about a new noise in your house. Examine the outside upper story soffit framing to see if any soffits are missing or broken. If so, there's a good chance something's crawled/flown up there. Get a good flashlight and check out the attic by slowly opening the access door/panel and looking around. If you find something up there, ...


9

Is your generator producing true sine wave, modified sine wave, or square wave output? The motor's designed to work on sine-wave AC, which is what large generators are happiest producing, and which is generally the most efficient form since all the energy goes into the single frequency and can be easily drawn back out. Square wave is easier for small ...


8

The best way to eliminate transformer noise is to purchase a quality transformer. The noise is because the laminated core is heavily loaded or overloaded and the plates are actually vibrating because of eddy currents. I can’t quite make out the size, but it looks like 24V, 20VA. I would bump it up to a 24V, 40VA unit that would be compatible with video ...


7

jigsaw. but really i think you underestimate how easy it is to cut through dimensional lumber with a sharp handsaw.


7

I don't know if this is the same issue but I'll mention it because "WUm-WUm-WUm-WUm-WUm" is exactly how I would describe it. When I moved into my first home, I would sometimes hear a low resonating sound like you said "WUm-WUm-WUm-WUm-WUm". It really scared me because I thought maybe it was my furnace or something but it would happen ...


6

If you can disassemble the frame, separate the siderails from the head and foot boards. Use a crayon or candle to wax the mating surfaces of the wood. This will help eliminate the squeeks. If the bolt has machine threads apply a small amount of thread lock (Loc-tite) which is available at the local hardware store. Get the smallest tube you can as you ...


6

GE dishwasher won’t drain. Washer is washing, but doesn’t drain. During drain cycle you hear a hum, but no water is flowing into the garbage disposal. Troubleshooting: Two common problems: 1. Drain hose is blocked at the garbage disposal or anti-siphon air gap connection. 2. Something is stuck in the drain pump so that the impeller blades can't turn. ...


6

Plant climbing vines at the wall, let them climb and cover. Take note of the "sound walls" around the interstates or beltways around the cities. Many have vines growing over them to aid in the sound deadening. Find what the specie is and go from there.


5

I hear the same noise and have done in a few houses. After years of chasing sounds round rooms I'm pretty sure the culprit is a tiny brown beetle I've found a few times, 1-3mm max. I'm struggling to identify it. My ex wife could hear it so I knew I wasn't going mad! It can really keep you awake for such a quiet sound! I live in West Wales in the UK.


5

Listen, sound patterns travel in the weirdest ways. My house is on a hill and there is a college a block away. Every night my house was shaking from bass and I was like "what the hell". I am thinking the kids were cranking up their bass so I ventured out on a recon mission. After a few nights of visiting the parking lot area I did realize it was a few ...


5

Here in Southern California when tract homes are constructed along freeways a block wall is constructed the length of the lots. Similar to yours I'm guessing. Rather than having a smooth and flat surface the face of the blocks are irregular and textured. Some project several inches past plumb while others look to have an angled face. It would appear that the ...


5

First, even though the exposed wires are low-voltage, likely 16 VAC, they should be covered for esthetics (if the transformer were accessible to children, not inside a closet, it is likely required). That said, the buzzing noise is likely being transmitted to the metal plate and wall, which make it much louder. A few things to reduce the buzz: Remove the ...


5

A short or arcing would most likely sound more like a buzzing (but could sound like a hiss, I guess) but would also be accompanied by smoke, a nasty "fried circuitry" ozoneish smell, and black soot marks near the source. I have never heard of this being a common source of danger for anything besides fire and/or shock. I think it is way more likely ...


5

Tools like a "skillsaw" employ what is called a universal motor. These have brushes and a commutator which creates tiny sparks which generate electrical noise. That noise is getting into your audio system at some point although it will take some detective work to determine exactly where. I'm not saying it's "normal" but it's not ...


5

Expanding on my comment, I suggest a couple of binary searches. That basically means splitting the house into two zones, and working out which zone the beeping is in, then splitting that into two subzones. These are best done when you're alone in the house. You might get lucky and end up sitting right near the source. The first is to work out whether it's ...


4

A white noise generator is like spraying perfume to cover a nasty smell. The smell is still there, just the perfume is stronger. The nastier the smell, the stronger the perfume needs to be to cover. A white noise generator produces noise that our brain quickly ignores. If this noise is louder that the outside noise, then it will mask it. But a word of ...


4

You could try partially closing the water supply shutoff valve to the water tank unit. This would reduce pressure and flow rate some and thus could also reduce the noise produced in tank. If you do decide on this approach make sure to test it out a number of times to make sure that the flush operation and the refill time are suitable.


4

You can buy sound deadening panels or sheeting - You would construct a fence-like structure inside your block wall, then hang the sound absorbing panels or sheeting from that. The material can be part-covered with regular wooden fencing, or plants, or painted, or a combination. You may be able to get away with only performing this treatment on a couple of ...


4

I've attempted to build a reasonably soundproof music room in my basement and can tell you it is a tall order. I built a room when finishing my basement using double drywall with Green Glue, a floating double drywall ceiling with hat channel and isolation clips, sealed outlets, and re-routed HVAC and it I can still only play at a moderate volume without ...


4

As an engineer having dealt with window and wall mount A/C noise problems for over a half century, I can offer you the most likely cause of the noise transmission and the solution to solve the noise problem. But first, we must understand that most, if not all, resonate noise vibrations in such units are being emitted by the compressor. Yes, the electric ...


4

I don't know if this is a legitimate answer, but I'd reconsider a hand saw. Depending on what works well for you, and what you need to do with the saw. I'd try a pull saw, very easy to use and makes a nice clean cut, almost anyone can get good results with this type of saw. They don't bind and they are very easy to get started. The way the blade is made, ...


4

Posting as answer: Did you try shutting off power to your house at the main breaker? That would rule out any AC-mains connected devices. What about your toilet? The fill valve can make noises like this and it can be continuous if it's leaking.


4

A "globe valve" would be more suitable for the task. Both ball valves and gate valves are intended primarily for shutoff - either fully open, or fully closed. A likely noise source is cavitation (bubbles forming and then collapsing) at the sharp edges in the flow when partially open. A gate valve has a plate with a (relatively) sharp edge that will ...


4

Do woodpeckers live in your vicinity ? That rattling sound with a few slower bangs after it really sounds like a woodpecker hammering. The other noises are certainly birds. That isn't necessarily inside your attic. You be surprised how sound can carry through a structure if it is being knocked on from the outside. And an attic in particular can act like a ...


3

Low sounds travel further, and are a lot harder to pinpoint direction. I used to live in a house that if you slept in the front upstairs bedroom, you could hear a low rumble all night long. Only I heard it (my wife's hearing isn't as good as mine) and only when the bed was in a particular spot. It turns out the rumbling was coming from parked refrigerator ...


3

It's probably just the pipes expanding and contracting under temperature changes. They can bind on an anchorage, then suddenly break loose. The floor and pipes do reverberate, amplifying the sound. The tension release and sudden movement can be very small, yet the resulting sound rather startling. If you can identify where the pipe is hanging up, you can ...


3

Be careful when tightening the bolt more, it might pull out of the wood completely if it is screwed into the wood somewhere. If it is a bolt that goes all the way through the wood with a washer on each side, though, you can probably try tightening it more or even replacing it with a new one and that may help. If you don't expect that you might need to ...


3

Couple options come to mind: Change the fan. Change the fan speed. Change the fan connection to the vent. Dampen the vent. Change the size or length of the vent. If you can't or don't want to change the fan, then try dampening the vent by clamping it somewhere to the building structure and possibly adding some padding or pipe insulation where it makes ...


3

First guess: sticky paint. With the screws loose, there's less contact between paint on either side. See also Doors are sticky and noisy when opened?


3

They make special screws just for your problem. After you screw it down they break off, leaving the screwed portion below the level of the carpet pad. Do an internet search.


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