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8

Or... just run the jacketed cable through the conduit It is permissible to run the entire, jacketed NM-B cable through the conduit. The restriction is that it takes a mighty bite out of conduit fill, because the NM-B cable must be treated the same as a round conductor of the wide dimension. This is particularly punishing when there are 2 "wires" (...


22

The wires in NM aren't labeled for use outside the cable jacket, and may not be the correct type for use in conduit to begin with First off, the wires inside a NM cable are not marked or labeled at all, which automatically makes them unsuitable for use in a conduit wiring method, as NEC 310.120 requires conductor insulation to be marked/labeled with the ...


1

Man, you guys just looooove your plastic boxes. You'll do anything to keep em. I'm a metal conduit guy and it would never occur to me to use a plastic box. Using a screw to attach a box to a joist isn't even a problem in my world. No inspector would flag a metal box for that. The screw holes you use, they're either pre-made or you drill them (set that ...


0

Explanations of this to make it simple is the largest size wire connecting to the device 14 awg 2x2 , or 12 awg 2.25x2 the device size did not change but the associated wire size did get larger may be a way to say it that is easier to understand. The device requires a 2x multiplier of the wire size that size is listed in 314.16.B. So the device being the ...


3

Using an NEC Handbook, which is the NEC with more information and comments, I find that the pigtails are currently counted as part of the device fill rather than a separate conductor. All of this can be found in Article 314.16 and the associated tables. The NEC Handbook has a set of separate commentary tables. In particular, Table 314.3 shows how different ...


3

Yes. There is often confusion between GFCI with AFCI. AFCI is arc fault protection and is mainly aimed at protecting wiring in the walls from arcing and sparking, which starts fires. . As such, in new work it must be at the breaker, since putting it at a receptacle would put the relevant wiring on the wrong side of the AFCI device. AFCI is required on many ...


4

As NoSparksPlease has pointed out you can find the requirement for GFCI protection in the NEC Article 210.8 and right in the first paragraph its states; The ground fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. As far as I know, that is the only requirement the NEC has for new installations. So whether you decide to use a ...


11

The Code doesn't specify location of protection. NEC 2017 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (E). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. Th 2020 Code changes (E) to (F), ...


1

Feeder sizing isn't so simple The minimum rules for service and feeder capacity planning are found in NEC Article 220; while they don't account completely for your usecase, we can use a modified version of those procedures here. We start with the 550sf you gave, and multiply it by 3 to get the lighting and general receptacle load as-if this was part of its ...


0

Go big. You can legally feed a 200 amp panel with a 50 amp breaker on 6 ga wire. Not that you'd want to do that, just an illustration of what's possible. In my shop, which is part of my house, I installed a 200 amp 40 space panel (Square D/ QO, not Homeline) fed by a 100 amp circuit from the main panel. You are smart in that you're installing a sub-panel ...


0

First of all, you want a 240V sub-panel and run 2 hots instead of 1 (plus neutral and ground). This way, you can split the load between legs and get away with smaller gauge wire. If you don't already have it, get a 20A/240V shop heater instead of 40A/120V. The wiring will be cheaper. In fact, put the tools and dust collector on 240 volts if you can. The ...


0

As far as rules an inspector will usually require a staple when crossing at each side. They will quote a neat and workmanship like manor and that cables going into a box without clamps have to be stapled within 8” but other than that following the floor joist is loosely defined.


1

As @George stated, running between joists is fine. Just don't attach to the bottom of the joists. That is not fine. One finer point, by the way...make sure you drill your holes in your joists within the middle 1/3 of the joist. Don't do it 1.5" from the bottom of the joist.


1

Moving them up would be the best bet. Cutting holes in the back of the cabinets to allow access to them might be code acceptable, as I understand it - if you can open a cabinet door and find the receptacle without having to unscrew anything, it's accessible. But you need countertop outlets anyway (not specific to kitchen countertop - cabinets with no ...


3

All junction boxes in use, whether with receptacles, splices, switches or other devices, must be accessible. Move 'Em This is probably the generally "best" answer. But it may involve significant work, depending on the type of wall. However, not only can receptacles not be covered, junction boxes can't be covered, even if they are only in use for a ...


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