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You can do this, but you're best off ditching gang-boxes to do so What you want is a 12VDC NEC Class 2 power supply, listed to UL 508. These are made as more-or-less commodity items, which is the good news. However, since they are mostly used for industrial controls work, they come in a DIN rail module form factor, which doesn't fit well into typical ...


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By the way, 55W heat dissipation is not allowed inside a 1-gang box. The 55W restriction is not about that, it's about something else. Other than that... Nothing in Code prohibits this But I'm not aware of any products that offer this in 12 volts DC. The lingua franca of low-voltage wiring in the US is 24 volts AC, and always has been. They certainly ...


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Mounting a splicing wire connector turns it into a pumpkinterminal block We know that by definition, as per ZMVV.GuideInfo: Splicing wire connectors establish a connection between two or more conductors by means of mechanical pressure and are not intended to be permanently mounted. They are floating, such as a twist-on connector in an outlet box. , a ...


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What if the wires are mounted while the splices remain floating? The wires could be bent and fixed neatly as one might do when setting up a terminal block, but then instead of using a terminal block, use a splicing connector. The following products are made by Advanced Cable Ties. In order, these are anchor mount, mounting base, mounting hole cable tie, and ...


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Calculators I checked online returned 2% voltage drop for 4/0 Al at 200A load. I wouldn't hesitate at all at that size. 240.4(B) allows the next larger breaker size when the ampacity doesn't correspond to a standard size. This makes qualifying for the 83% rule irrelevant. The Informational Note in 2017 NEC 215.2 recommends a 3% drop maximum for Feeders, ...


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The 83% derate only applies if it is all the service to a single dwelling unit. With 75A of A/C and two dryers, that sounds like something else. So let's ignore the 83% derate. Suppose we use 4/0 wire First, a couple common errors in sizing voltage drop are calculating ampacity on breaker trip - you should actually calculate it on practical daily load --...


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I ended up buying SEU compression clamps and drilling out the rubber grommet with a round drill to fit SER. It feels wrong, and its certainly not listed for that use. But it seems to be the best option available, and in my limited testing it is weathertight.


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Mutually Incompatible Certification Schemes The primary problem with what you describe (installing a foreign-standards receptacle into a North American electrical system) is while foreign receptacles of reputable make (vs. some Cheese-pipeline special) are going to have a third-party certification, that certification is going to stem from a different ...


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There is no listing for non-standard receptacles, so at a basic level, it would require "examination" by the AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) in your area under NEC Article 90.7 to make sure it doesn't violate the basic "suitable for use" rules in Article 110.3. You might find an AHJ who will accept the IEC certifications as adequate, you might not, there ...


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