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15

People were using them to secure things or hang things on. They serve no purpose. I would just pull them out since hammering them in probably will not be that easy. You might want to get a small board to press against so you do no damage drywall. Also FYI I do not think the drywall that is currently on there is going to take pain - even primer - that well....


13

I don't know Brad There are no "brad nailers" in my lexicon as a former pro and perpetual home improver*. There are only finish/trim nailers that accept either 18ga. or 16ga. nails. Which you need depends on the job. Most 18ga. guns only shoot up to 2" nails. Some only do 1-1/2". That's inadequate for things like heavy base trim and door ...


13

I know Brad Also you need to get to know brad really well since that is the exact type of nail to use for shoe molding. What is the difference between a Finishing nail and a Brad nail Well the nails are different gauges with the brad nail being thinner. And also brad nails usually have smaller heads. But really the best way to describe a brad nail vs a ...


8

They look like nails used as simple hangers. The ones in the corners are clearly driven into studs. These can be removed without issue.


7

"I am not planning to use it with any regularity" So, small hammer, nailset, perhaps a pair of nail-holding pliers. Perhaps a toolbelt to hold those and a supply of finish nails. If you don't have production-level needs, you don't need the hassles and complexity and more things to go wrong of production-level tools. Complex mechanisms you don't ...


5

Loosen it by tapping it lightly to moderately hard, back and forth--side to side, then when it is sufficiently loose pull it out. Tap parallel to the longer dimension of the rectangular cross section. AFIK this type of nail (cut nail) is a not a hardened steel nail for driving into concrete. It may be hardly into the concrete and you might be able to pull it ...


5

Based on your successful trial from my speculative comment: I suspected that if you hit them with a hammer hard enough to get them to move (a bit more in - perhaps 1/8 of an inch) they might then be more willing to pull out (since I expect they are corroded-into-the-pressure-treated-wood for "why they are stuck so hard?") You say it worked, so ...


5

They don't. The table lists rated uplift loads for particular installation scenarios, presumably with the largest nails that offer practical benefit. It doesn't list installation requirements. See footnote #13 for some clarification. It describes loading for alternative fasteners: Allowable DF/SP/SPF uplift load for the H .2.5A fastened to a 2x4 truss ...


4

3 1/2” 16d nails are hand driven nails specified for Simpson connectors 0.162...many people make the mistake and think these are collated nails, but they are actually individual nails sold by the box. There is not a gun that will shoot them. If you refer to the Simpson manual, you will see the difference in the nails as far as diameter. As a former ...


3

I use a nail Jack or puller just as you have. Most folks that can’t pull the nail are using the puller with the handle down, raise it up bite the nail and pull, this doubles the torque and has never failed me. You have the shaft of the nail available so the nail Jack is not even needed. A framing hammer will work also. We don’t use the head but the nail ...


3

A nail with small or no head - like a finish nail - would have to be at a 45-degree angle in order to hold the picture without it sliding right off. A nail with a relatively large head - like a common nail - can be hammered straight in. Screws can also work well, and let you easily adjust as needed. Wood screws are technically "best" for this, but ...


3

They are ring-shank nails, so they are hard to pull by design. You need a crow-bar, pry-bar, ripping bar, wrecking bar. Solid steel with the "claw" on a looped end, 2 or 3 feet long. Not a hammer. Apologize to your hammer if you haven't already wrecked it. Preferable to leave the heads on, as it will be faster to rip them out with the bar if you ...


3

Use an end nipper to cut them flush: Brand name on image included deliberately as this is an endorsement because quality products give better performance.


2

I use a nail jack or crescent nail puller. I have demoed many decks and membrane roofs with this tool. It has a beak you place over the head, on nails that are set into the wood it takes a couple hits to get under the head but with washers I can usually grab the head and rock them right out. I have even used My nail jack to pull finishing nails out of hardie ...


2

Well honestly you can't do much with them. I wouldn't take a grinder or anything like that too them as during the cutting process you are surely loosening the nails and you risk them potentially failing or popping on the other side. Even bending these into the board more, that is a risk I wouldn't take as the reward (still doesn't look perfect) outweighs ...


2

Stick to the screws, and buy something appropriate to your wall-type at the hardware store to hang from. The serrated bits are a form of picture hanger that normally mounts on the wooden frame (top center, usually just one, the serrations allow you to move it on a nail or screw until it hangs straight. If you use more than one, you have to get the things in ...


2

I would be using small screws - easily available in lengths less than 1/2" but you are also helped by the bracket thickness. Also you should drill pilot holes for the screws - make sure you plan the positions so that you don’t coincide with any letters. Messing this up will affect the stability of your home life so measure carefully twice then cut once.


2

Have you tried Boot Pinch pliers on the nail? They bite into the shaft of the nail and the fulcrum is the curved surface beside the jaws, so there's a lot of leverage. As the nail rises, you will want to reposition the bite. Sometimes helps to have a small block of scrap wood to lever off as well. There is a possibility that a firm squeeze can bite ...


2

If you have an angle grinder and the proper personal protection equipment (PPE) it can be used to grind off the nail level with the concrete surface. I would prefer this solution because other methods to pry, pull or pound on the nail risk blistering out the adjoining concrete. Now a cracked out pit in the concrete may not be a problem in many cases but may ...


1

The "golden rule" for deciding if you should use a nail or a screw is… "Bang a nail in & if the wood splits, you should have used a screw." To be less flippant, if you're unsure use a screw; if you're still unsure, drill a pilot first. Alternatively, on something of such little weight, glue it or use removable picture hanging stickies ...


1

I would also encourage the use of small screws to attach the sawtooth hangers to the back of the name board. You can easily get small diameter screws that are 3/8" long from below the head to the end of the tip. Sawtooth brackets supplied with nails are going to have very small holes in the ends and so these will most probably need to be drilled out to ...


1

Going by the drip edge over top the ledger it appears indeed that there is siding behind the ledger. You can confirm this by measuring the distance from the front of the cut joist to the siding and on its other side to the ledger, and there would be 1.5in difference. The ledger may be nailed all the way through the siding and through any sheathing into the ...


1

I agree with what's been said here. Go get a separate hanging kit, because those nails do not look like they're meant to hang art. They look like nails that are supposed to be driven into concrete with a .22 blank round. I'd email the company and request a partial refund or a correct hanging kit.


1

Consider that the old nail holes have saved you the step of drilling pilot holes. If you are installing hardwood trim with a hammer and nail set it is easy to split the piece -- especially on seasoned wood. Since there are already nail holes in the trim, the chances of splitting the wood is very low. Here are some other suggestions: If the opening is too ...


1

Just two quick things. Given that your nail heads were covered, I would have just bent them back and broke them off. But if they came out and you have holes on the other side that's fine. Honestly every trim/nail-type might have a best method so there isn't anything that someone can categorically say. To go into existing holes... Get a better quality ...


1

Are they ring shank nails? If so you should be ok hitting them back in. If not, I would remove and use deck screws to fasten the subfloor back down.


1

You don't need a finish nailer. An 18ga brad nailer with 2" brad nails would be more than okay and has a number of advantages. Smaller holes that need to be touched up. less likely to split the wood if too close to the edge. lighter weight gun less expensive gun if you want to go cordless I replaced the trim in my entire house with an 18ga brad nailer ...


1

If only a few rogues and you can get at them with Junior hacksaw then saw just under half way through near to board as possible. Bend over with pliers or mole grips for better grip. Add a blob of 2 part epoxy if it is still sharpish at the bend or a bit of blue tack for quickness. This is only suitable for small area as tiles now pinned tight and make them ...


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