10

Yes, you can do that and it will swap the power to the light and fan. Just remember to turn off the power at the breaker before doing any work.


6

That should be fine. The only question is how many neutral (white) wires are connected and if two, are they connected to separate wires to the fan. If there are two and they connect separately, you should swap them too. As @Jack noted, make sure to turn off the breaker before working; don’t depend on the switches being off.


5

Better idea: use a part listed for the job to bypass the errant current around the lights Fortunately, there's a way to bypass the errant "phantom" current (from capacitive coupling through the parallel traveler wires) back to neutral without doing anything that'd void your insurance. Simply nut a Lutron LUT-MLC in between switched-hot and neutral ...


5

This is two three-way switches from the looks of things, but wired in a nonstandard fashion From the wires you have, this does appear to be a fairly basic three-way switch circuit with both switches on loops from the light fixture, but with the way the second switch is wired, and the way you were able to get it working, it's not a standard three-way switch. ...


5

Based on your details on what you did with the replacement outlet, I'd say you didn't remove the metal tab on the outlet connecting the two brass, power, screws. Doing this allows the two outlets to be split between always hot and switched hot. The one wire you "punched" into the backstab should be pigtailed so you don't use the backstab. they are ...


5

OK, I notice that in the "junction" box, you have matched up all black wires and all white wires. As if you expected that all wires just come naturally color-coded like that. No, that does not happen, unless you do it yourself. Designing a 3-way+lamp complex is not that hard. Certain wires have to go certain places, and they have conventional ...


5

Don't waste your time. Have a /3 cable bypass the lamps. This is a rather straightforward problem if you aren't trying to snake the travelers through the bulb sockets. I know you imagine some great cost savings in wire by doing that... forget it. Besides... running travelers through the bulb sockets is pointless, and takes up a LOT of splice space inside ...


5

No, you're actually fine on that front here The C-D conduit meets 300.3(B) despite not having a neutral in it for the same reason old-style switch loops were compliant with that rule: all the power is coming back via the same wiring path it went to the switch on. In other words, current in on the hot = current out on one of the two travelers, which are both ...


4

If you're not sure how the terminals on a switch are used, the best thing to do is to unwire it and test the continuity between each pair of terminals, in each switch position. In this case, you can be pretty confident about the two-way switch. You just need to find which terminal on the three-way is the common. "...do I connect the yellow and red Black ...


4

The first thing you do is roll it all back to status quo ante with the original switches and get it back where it works 100%. Now you'll see a black wire that is split to go to at least 2 switches. (it may pogo from switch to switch). We're not worried about that one for now, but its function is always-hot. We'll be spending most of our time with the ...


4

A 14/3 with a 3-way switch is going to be: Traveler 1 Traveler 2 Either hot (in) or switched hot (out) That means you don't have a neutral, which is a must for a receptacle (switched or not). However, there might be a solution if you can use smart switches. Many 3-way smart switches only need one traveler. You could, potentially, install smart switches and ...


4

Turn off breaker. Disconnect wires. Connect appropriate meter (safely). Turn on breaker, look at meter. If no voltage, turn off breaker, move to other switch, connect meter, repeat. Or use a test lamp, if you are old-fangled. The folks around here are fond of "non-contact voltage testers" but they appear to be prone to confusing results. I'm old-...


4

Some inspectors will give you a hard time over that usability issue. Three-ways are required in certain hallways and stairways, and an inspector who doesn't know when a three-way is required and when it isn't, might simply reject anything that confuses him. You can purchase a single yoke device with two three-ways, that physically occupies one gang location ...


3

I can't make sense of any of that German spaghetti. Here's how 3-way circuits are actually wired: or As well as 3-4 other possible rearrangings-of-furniture, giving the same wires doing the same loop, but on different routings. Is there any reason to doubt that the wiring diagram above represents how the switches are wired? Yeah, lots of reasons to ...


3

No. You cannot poach a neutral from the other switches in Box B. This is a Code violation, potential firestarter, and will trip any AFCI or GFCI breakers in use. There must be separation between the 3 wires coming into that 3-way and all other wires in the box. Nothing can cross that gap except for safety ground. Since your circuits apparently do have ...


3

OK, the red tape and the yellow taped black wires go to your single switch, terminals 1 and 2 on your picture. The blue taped black wire is your common load for the three way switch since you've only got one breaker and should go to the #4, black terminal, on your picture. The other two blue taped wires on the white and red wires are the travelers and should ...


3

OK, so here's what we know about 3 cables (and can guess about the 4th). Note that "color coding" is not happening here and the color codes will be a chaotic rainbow, with no consistency whatsoever. This situation is why I own 10 colors of tape. The only consistent color rule is if neutral is present, it must be on white. And that's the end of ...


3

Grats on realizing the importance of the screw colors. That matters. Position doesn't. Now, the problem is, it's clear that travelers are not properly identified. Now, I'll tell you a Harperism: I like to positively identify travelers, and when I know what they are, I mark them with yellow tape. Both travelers can be yellow, they are interchangeable and ...


3

It is a 4-way switch. 2 travelers from each direction but no hot or switched hot. You have a 3-way on each b end.You can have any number of 4-ways in between. The reds are carrying switched hot from one end to the fixture at the other end.


3

That's a hot, not a ground What you're seeing is an always-hot wire most likely, not a ground, that lands on the terminal screw then continues onward somewhere else in the circuit; some electricians will cut the wire and pigtail, others will use both terminals in a screw-and-clamp, and yet others will wrap a stripped section mid-wire around the screw as you ...


3

You can do that if you really, really want to, using common 3-way switches and simply pigtailing the two travelers and neutral at switch 1 or switch 2. I recommend splitting the branches at switch 1, so that when you regain your senses, you can simply get a twin 3-way switch and fall back to the solution A. I. Breveleri recommends.


3

I feel your pain. In my house I have many panels with multiple switches. In one location I have three 2-ways, two 3-ways, two hot outlets, one switched outlet, and a pilot light. I often stand there and flip sundry switches until I get the result I need. And I'm the person who wired it. There is no widely recognized vocabulary of symbols or colors to ...


3

I find considerable usefulness in neatly printed labels for light switches that are otherwise non-obvious in function. The most puzzling one I actually sorted out (as opposed to various switches to nowhere I've encountered) was a humidistat in a kitchen with no humidifier that turned out to be the control for the stove hood exhaust fan. I labeled that with ...


2

First of all, I think someone just did the coloring nonstandard; they simply used red to the fixture for whatever reason. Also, your diagram doesn't show a red between the 4-way and 3-way switches. I'll assume that's an oversight and it's actually there, because if not, you have bigger problems... That said, there are a couple of things possibly at play. ...


2

ncv's will go off for just about anything. never trust an NCV with your life. cheaper ones will go off from shaking them. i was in a house once where it went off in the entire upstairs. the house was also below large powerlines. knob and tube , switch loops (where there is no neutral or ground) have a larger electric field. also a loose neutral could cause ...


2

What model of switch? Are the lamps incandescent? My answer with the info provided: Pulsating may mean a switch designed for incandescent lamps where ballasts or drivers used with CFL’s or LED’s. These lights don’t have the leakage path that an incandescent lamp has. this would be my guess with the info provided. In some cases older LED’s the switch lamp ...


2

To eliminate a 3-way switch, simply connect the feed wire to either one of the traveler wires, using a wirenut or similar approved connection device. Isolate the other traveler wire by capping it with a wirenut. You can identify the feed wire as it will connect to one side of the switch and the traveler wires will be on the other side. If you are not sure, ...


2

Let's answer the second question first (quoting from your comment) My only concern with that approach is my inability to staple the cable within 12" of the box - which I believe is required by NEC code 314.17(C). Old work boxes have push-in clamps which secure the wire to the box. It's equivalent to a NM clamp on a metal box. Compare them to new work ...


2

Your first two switches in the sketch are set up to basically reverse the polarity between the hot and neutral. this is really not a thing in AC, more used to reverse DC motors. I doubt this is up to code (though ill leave it for the code experts to chime in), and IT IS NOT safe and i'm not sure what function it would provide you. Normally the neutral ...


2

Actually since there are no white wires on the 3-ways, this gets simple. The black and red wires that DO go to the 3-ways are part of cables. Note which cables they are. It matters. Almost certainly, two cables are involved, and the 2 white wires in those cables are connected to each other. As long as that's so, you can add the smart switch's white wire to ...


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