New answers tagged

1

Put long wood boards about 2-3" wide across the bend, and glue and screw the whiteboard to the 3" wide boards to force the whiteboard to be flat. Squish the bent whiteboard against the 3" boards. I prefer to add screws because glue often fails in damp environments, or just over time. Example: Curved whiteboard is on the left, straightening board on the ...


1

I love those anchors and use them all the time. Don't bother trying to patch the hole and re drilling it, the patch won't hold. Leave the old anchors in the wall and install a new one an inch or so to the right or left of the old one. Then measure the distance between the keyholes, center to center, and measure that distance from the center of your new ...


0

I use the plastic versions of those all the time when installing gear in walls for the offices I setup. They make a pretty small version of that same one, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HQBVV4J #6 X 1-¼” screws. I usually leave the one that is in the wrong place in the wall, to keep the integrity of the sheetrock, and put another one next to it. Its not a ...


0

Those anchors you have there will not allow you to move over the least little bit. I personally do not care for those type at all, I had them fail before and a pool stick rack went straight to the floor. I didn't like that.... I prefer plastic wall anchors that lock into the back of the wall, and they are soft enough you can set the screw right into the ...


1

The sagging potential is not necessarily related to the "wooden battens" in option 1. It is dependent on the material the desk top is made of. A top made of thick enough strong material will not sag ( unless a sufficient weight is placed on it for an extended amount of time). You could add a piece of angle iron or something underneath to beef up the top. ...


2

The hardest piece of your question is the sag and being able to support the weight of someone resting at the mid point. A 2x4 ledger attached to the 3 walls to support the desk solves everything except the sag. At ~7ft across, for the sag the best option is probably metal angle iron set back 6" from the front and secured to the side walls using either a ...


0

Instead of drilling through the tiles to hang the cabinet, you could also drill through the grout lines only. Obviously, you will need a small enough drill and screws to not damage the tiles, and depending on how the cabinet mounts, it may not allow you to place screws in the right location. But the grout would be easier to repair than tile (though it might ...


0

I would get some foam tape labelled "permanent" and use that. The stuff holds impressively well, and it'll do the job if installed properly. I've seen hundreds of towel and soap dispensers in commercial buildings installed this way for years. When you're done with the cabinet you'll be able to slide a metal blade behind the cabinet and slice the foam, then ...


3

In a word no. First issue is you are renting. The owner has specified no holes in the tile. There is no guarantee the adhesive, if it held won't damage the tile when the cabinet is removed. I would suggest getting some sort of a base cabinet, perhaps a bookcase size piece and mount the mirror cabinet to the top .


1

After drilling a test hole inspect the drill bit for metal shavings. It would be helpful to magnetize the bit first -- simply sticking the magnet to the bit may be enough. Clean the bit before starting; if it emerges with any metal shavings then you'll know you drilled through more than just drywall.


4

Pass a bent piece of stiff wire into one of the holes and use it to feel around inside the wall nearby.


1

A small pocket sized neodymium magnet would definitely tell you of there were any metal studs. A metal stud's dimension is approximately the same dimension as a wood one, so drilling into one ( were the 3 holes I see on your pic ) should have netted a "stud" metal or otherwise, if one were there, I'm saying.


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