New answers tagged

0

If Elfa drywall and plaster anchors can hold shelving, they should be able to hold a TV. I don't think it is necessary to open the wall. Drywall supported by a pair of steel studs should be sufficient. Use four of these anchors, or their equivalent, through the drywall and through the edges of the steel studs to clamp a suitable piece of plywood to the studs ...


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Why not just place and screw a 2x4 between the top and bottom plates at 16in on center until you fill in the width of the area. Now screw as many 2x4's on edge to the studs wherever you plan on mounting the tv. Then screw your plywood into the studs you add, then screw the sheetrock into the plywood and use lag bolts to screw the tv mounting hardware into ...


1

I did not have enough confident to hang the TV on the wooden paneling alone, so I have cut a square hole big enough for the bracket and use 8mm drill bit to drill hole for the bolt (6 pieces) to hang the bracket to the wall and now the TV can sit nicely on that.


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What you have was very common years ago for basement finishing. People would attach 3/4" furring strips (usually 5/8" thick) to the concrete and the add 3/4" white bead board between the furring strips and add wood paneling as the finish. The bead board was sold in bundles sized to fit between the furring strips that were attached at 16" ...


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Several options Drill at an angle: Just use a longer drill, anchor, and screw to achieve more depth into the brick. You can also use a short drill extension (10cm) to reduce the angle a little, rather than a very long extension that takes you entirely out of the recess. Use the side wall: Your problem is the back of the cabinet is just a flimsy decorative ...


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those plugs will probably be stronger at an angle. If you're drilling into brick or concrete a drill extension is not going to work well, you'll need to use a long drill bit if you want to reduce the angle. If the cupboard exactly fits the alcove you can drill and screw through the sides of the cupboard into the end walls instead, that will be stronger than ...


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Get a drill bit extension Something similar to one of these: Images courtesy of Lowes.com. No recommendation intended or implied The first one will work with any drill and bit - you insert the bit then tighten down both of the little set screws. I've got one of these and it does work, but it's a bit of a pain. (I long ago used a bit of masking tape to hold ...


2

If there is a suitably sized lintel resting on studs it is safe. If the lintel was regarded as not weight bearing and built just strong enough to support the top of the door frame but no more then it might not be safe. Either way I would worry with a doorway this wide that enthusiastic pull-ups might cause slight horizontal movement, in the direction in and ...


2

Your paneling appears to be nominally 3/8", or about 5/16" actual. That's not sufficient to hold lag screws with confidence, in my opinion. Assuming that the paneling is well fastened to the framing, hollow wall anchors should do nicely. Your TV isn't crazy heavy and the mount keeps it close to the wall, so there isn't an extraordinary amount of ...


3

That appears to be Unistrut® or something exactly similar. A well-equipped hardware or electrical / mechanical supply place will have it, or you can get them mail order. Double-check dimensions in case it's something non-standard, but that looks exactly like.


8

that stand does not look like it was designed for wall mounting. I think the mounting points the back are only to prevent it from tipping over.


6

I would NOT try to mount the cabinet on the wall. Get a wall mount for your TV. Follow the instructions for installing the wall mount. Done and done.


2

You can buy a TV bracket suitable to mount a small TV on a single stud, for $20. The only objective you've stated is to save that money. If you want to do a botch job there's nothing really wrong with hanging a TV from a hook. That's a lot safer than hanging a flimsy chipboard shelving unit on the wall by one screw and putting a TV loosely on top of it! ...


14

I am going to guess that cabinet is 60" wide. Assuming your studs are 16" oc then you should have 3 studs in the wall behind the tv stand. Forget the pre-drilled holes your tv stand gave you. I'll assume the top is flush to the back of the cabinet. First I'd put a ledger - a 2x4 - under the full width of the cabinet at the bottom to position the ...


32

Technically might work. NOT RECOMMENDED. Mount a piece of plywood on the wall, screwed into 2 studs. Mount stand to plywood. Done. If you paint the plywood to match the wall (doesn't need to be perfect) it will blend into the background. However, this is all assuming the stand is truly designed to be wall-mounted. The pictured stand looks like it would be ...


1

3-1/4" x 1-1/2" ? I have a hunch you simply have 2x4s - which are actually 3-1/2" x 1-1/2" turned flat to provide a heavy duty structure but not be quite as thick as a regular stud wall. If that's the case, as long as you can get screws (but use 2" screws, not 2-1/2") to hold the mount into at least 2 studs, you will be fine. ...


3

Spackle provides virtually no strength. Fortunately for you, putting new holes an inch away will be fine, though the further the better. Leaving the anchors in will also provide no strength. Next time, measure twice, drill once.


2

If you use strut get the 1/4-20 strut nuts and they will hold the panel to the strut with no problems, make sure to lag the strut in place. I use strut regularly for mounting when the box(s) or disconnect(s) need spacing or proper support. Make sure to debur the edges if you cut it or you can end up getting a nasty cut putting the nuts in the channel.


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Since the hole in your "ceiling" is bigger than the anchors you might have wanted to use, your best alternative is to use toggle bolts similar to the one pictured below.


1

I would just use structural screws and add fender washers if I was worried abut the screws pulling through the back of the panel. It all depends on what size of gorilla you want to be prepared for. alternatively you can use a hole-saw nibbler, chassis punch, dremel, offset snips, etc to make a hole where you want it (so long as it doesn't foul the equipment ...


2

Tricky situation. I think you're right that the microwave's weight is supposed to be supported mostly by the wall bracket at the bottom edge. A fair chunk of weight is supported by the upper screws at the front edge though -- especially when the door is open, and particularly so when the door is pulled open-and-down by a short adult or a child (even if ...


3

You're essentially creating an inverted shelf over your microwave. Just adhere to all the principles of mounting a shelf: Adequately strong brackets Anchors of appropriate size and depth Shelf material that's up to the task I would not use brackets of that type. They don't seem robust enough to me. Heavy gauge steel with a diagonal brace would be your best ...


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