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If the brackets are lag screwed into plywood, I wouldn't trust it. There isn't much meat for threads to work with in 1/2" plywood, and there is going to be some vibration from the compressor. If it's held in with toggle bolts, it will be very strong, I would not be worried about it pulling out. But I'd still rather not have a vibrating piece of ...


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From your description the sprinkler pipes are hung with rod hangers in the ceiling, and pipe hangers in the rod hangers. That would work fine but you wouldn't be able to slide the curtain past the pipe hanger. If you want to suspend the pipe from beam to beam, you could use EMT - thinwall metal electrical conduit, normally used for wiring, available at ...


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Try hooks on the angles of the vault. Then you can hang rope/cable with only another hook or two to support the center. If you are hanging curtains, place the hooks where two panels met. Look for threaded bridle rings for the middle so you can fuss with it easier. 2 inch Bridle Ring from ShowMeCables.com


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That is called a rod coupling nut. The part above it is a double ended wood screw threaded rod stud, or something like that Or you can buy a vertical threaded rod hanger


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The sleeve piece you asked about may be a threaded insert (photo from https://www.ezlok.com/threaded-inserts-for-wood): The "long bolt" is called threaded rod or all-thread. The clamp piece for the pipe is called a pipe hanger. As you'll see if you do an image search, there are a multitude of styles available. I couldn't quite work out a mental image of ...


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I would use 3/8 toggle bolts. At 50 inches, you should be able to hit the hollow part of the blocks. If they aren't hollow, then great, go with sleeve anchors, which should be fine according to the calculations above. I used to see old tube type TV mounted in classrooms to blocks all the time.


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I installed a similar attachment to this in my closet on an exterior block wall. I used 3/8" toggles with 3/8" threaded rod , washers and nuts. I did not use the 8 holes but only the top hole on each support. I was lucky and got the hollow portion of the block. It hadn't budged in 35 years.


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The problem can be divided into 3 parts: A) Determine the static pull-out force. B) Determine the dynamic to static force ratio. My gut feel is 2X to 3X, but I have nothing to back it up. C) Determine the appropriate fasteners and/or additional interface. This is only an answer to part A. The problem is much easier to solve if a few simplifications are ...


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I think you're over thinking this. You have 4 mounting holes across the top, which is going to want to pull away from the wall when you hang from the bar. I'm not concerned about the shear (straight down) force as you have 4 more bolts along the bottom to help with that force. Not sure how much you weigh, but let's say you're a big guy, 250 lbs. That's ...


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I've used a product made by 3M called Outdoor Mounting Tape, sometimes called Outdoor Permanent Mounting Tape. It's a slightly-foamy strip with adhesive on both sides and a tremendous grip and durability. It's available via Amazon, as well as many local outlets. My local grocery chain carries it in the utility items aisle. I've mounted items to my ...


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I would use a few dabs of silicone bathroom sealer at the corners and hold it in place until it sets. It wouldn’t take much to hold and if you want to remove it later dental floss slid behind acts like a chainsaw on the silicone. I glue plastic name plates to equipment at work, sometimes the instructions change so a new plate is needed, a minute and a ...


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