27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


18

Yes. They can be however far apart the builder wants them. I have used 3-4 studs within 16" when doing bathrooms, high traffic corner, in bathrooms for showers... and have installed an extra stud because of a previous mistake. I only use magnetic stud finder (finds your screws). If you use a method and you just aren't 100% sure the best thing to do ...


14

You could also simply redrill new holes to match the framing. 2 or 3 new holes near the ones that are there will not weaken the bar. The holes look oversized for a range of fasteners, you could use smaller holes if you are using 1/4" lag bolts for example.


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


9

16 is a typical maximum spacing, there is no restriction on having more, it just may be overbuilt. It can be quite common to encounter studs that are doubled up or have strange intervals. Common causes are framing of windows or doors, made especially strange if the window or door is no longer there. Same with changes to load bearing wall situations can leave ...


9

You are correct to hang a TV (or anything else "heavy") from a stud or other building structural member. This provides reliable support under static and dynamic loading (think: weight, moment-arm, any leaning, minor earthquakes, vibrations from door slams), and ensures the wall material does not bend or crumble or crack over time. When you use a ...


8

Assuming that "plasterboard on OSB" means that the studs were first fully covered with OSB, then that was dressed up with plasterboard for a nicer finish, you have a very sturdy wall! I just build a storage shed using 3/4" (~18mm) plywood as the floor. I expect it to hold 100s of kilos at the contact points for each of the shelving units. If ...


7

Don't Replace, ADD Removing the screws is a lot of extra work, for no real benefit. In fact, you might even find that some of the old drywall screws snap when you try to unscrew them, and then you have no practical choice but to add other screws anyway, leaving the partial screws in the studs. Just add proper cabinet screws. Depending on the layout, you ...


6

I'd use whatever stool or chair you have around at the low end, and a stepladder or similar at the high end, possibly just leaning against the exterior wall outside the door. Cable ties, string, or duct tape would secure the pipe well. A little weight on low rungs could add stability. I love this idea and may borrow it myself (or some Rube Goldbergian ...


6

Use proper sheet-metal screws into the studs. "Self-drilling" screws will save a step, or you can pre-drill the proper size hole for the screws. Your worry is unrealistic - steel studs are quite robust.


6

100 lbs. jostling about creates quite a bit of force. I'd consider a 4x4 adequate up to about 8 feet of span. After that it's going to quickly become a rubber bad. Or worse, it could fracture and come down (hard). For spans of 8-12 feet, I'd put a 2x10 oriented vertically in a pair of joist hangers, and I'd put another flat on top of it, screwed every foot ...


6

Yes, that is exactly what you want to do. Have the 2x4 extend past the five studs shown in your picture and make sure your screws/bolts go at least 1" into the studs. They can go further if you're sure there's no wires through the studs.


6

Open up wall where you want to mount the TV, add some wood crossing, re-drywall, install your kit correctly. I would go so far as adding a full wood "box" so that you have an area parallel to the metal studs that can help support the crosses.


5

Welcome to old houses. 16 inches is the standard stud spacing (means a 4x8 foot sheet of drywall or sheathing plywood is supported by 3 studs vertically and 7 horizontally. Why do we build modulo 4 feet? Because, back in the days of plaster and lath work, dating back centuries, lathing (done by a lather) is a specialized trade of its own. Lathers would break ...


4

Last place I'd put one, as a network/wiring pro. Basements (off the floor/above flood levels) are good, attics not so much, and anywhere you plan to inhabit is usually a poor choice (the noise gets very tedious very quickly.) Thus, an attic that you think will be cool enough because you'll convert it to a room that you will use is still not a good choice. ...


4

There are screws designed for hanging cabinets, they are called cabinet screws. Some have more attractive heads, if that is important to you. You need to hit the studs. Hopefully, the existing screws hit the studs. Assuming that you have wood studs, if you have metal studs, you will need advice from someone else. An impact driver is very useful when driving ...


4

With proper anchors 3 studs are fine. One #10 wood screw penetrated 1" into cedar (the least quality of commercial lumber) will resist pull out of about 90 lbs, into most typical framing studs (with a specific gravity greater than 0.45) will hold 150 lbs.


4

It really depends on your technique. The stud doesn't care. Plenty of them have knots bigger. If you can leave even half the hole diameter between the new and old holes it'll be virtually as strong as otherwise. Mount the bracket using other holes, then drill the new hole. The steel will prevent your bit from dropping into the original hole. Of course, ...


4

drill holes in the frame where the studs are. No way would I put a $1000 TV on toggle bolts.


4

There should be some sort of framing around the ductwork although I would bet it's just a 1x2 board and not suitable for lag bolts. I would suggest to do the shelf idea or mount it from the ceiling.


4

You should not mount anything to the beam (A) by drilling in to it. Under load the bottom is under tension and the width of the hole reduces how much the beam can manage. Think of it as cutting a strand in a rope. Theoretically you could saddle the beam with a strap, rope, chain, and cut out a section of sheet rock to allow for play, or have a brace made to ...


4

The wood that's visible around the edge of that opening is plywood. I would suggest opening up several other boxes throughout the apartment (or at least along that wall) to see if they're all like that. If this wall seems to have a consistent plywood backing, you're in luck because all it takes is a few of the appropriate sized lag bolts (specified in the ...


4

Yes, that is a common solution; mounting another piece of wood that can accommodate what you are hanging. For bikes, you should use some lag screws to attach the piece of wood.


4

Find and use studs for this. Dynamic human weight ... moving, vibrating, 200 pounds in motion being pulled to a stop by the wall. Drywall anchors are not designed for that, nor is drywall. You want 3-inch lag bolts centered carefully on wood studs or toggle bolts through metal studs and ideally multiple ones for redundancy. Also I agree with the comment ...


4

Bad idea overall to mount a TV up high over a fireplace. Just do a search here and you will find many answers discouraging this for a multitude of reasons. Key among the reasons is based upon the fact the best viewing of a TV is pretty much straight onto its screen. In addition, for your physical health the best viewing position is sitting and looking ...


3

If you've ever watch a pro install mirror walls, they have a bucket of construction adhesive, made for mirrors, and they put a glob on each corner of the mirror and a glob in the center. They then place it on the wall and push. They will stick even if the wall isn't smooth and they can be adjusted if the wall is uneven. You'll need to support the bottom row ...


3

Why not have some fun here? See if you can find some sort of flared funnel and make the whole thing look like an Alpenhorn? Find some small but solid-ish demon or witch model figure to use as a support for the lower end, as tho' hesheit were holding it up.


3

After failing to find a solution that would (1) look alright, (2) not devalue the house, and (3) be permanent, I looped back and looked to blackout curtains more. The solution I ended up with involved: Getting blackout roller shades cut to size, installing them myself. Buying floor-length blackout curtains and sewing magnets into the seams where they meet, ...


3

The first option that comes to mind is U-strut. (Channel strut or C-channel) Photo from fireequip.com.au The first two struts would be mounted vertically on studs with at least three points. Use double ended lag screws, (wood threads on one side and machine threads on the other) Pilot drill through the siding/foam board and into a stud. Drive the ...


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