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7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


6

Ceiling fan boxes only have to support 35 lbs. ceiling fans (according to NEC), unless they are designed to support more. In which case they will be marked with the amount they can support, up to the maximum of 70 lbs. So no, I would not recommend hanging a punching bag (assuming a heavy bag) from a ceiling fan bracket.


5

Plan 2 (solid plywood) for the win. That kind of weight (with extra leverage) would be terrible in just drywall with a single stud. Speaking of leverage, if you can consider making the strip of ply a little taller (like, 2'), it should be a little more solid. (Admittedly, this might be overkill.) In addition to getting the plywood into at least 2 studs, you'...


4

You don't want an SDS plus chuck, that drill is going to be mostly for drilling masonry. You could get an adapter to use regular bits with the SDS chuck but it's not what you really want. There are drills with a regular three-jaw chuck that have a hammer setting for masonry, they aren't as good as the SDS chuck drills in masonry but more than adequate ...


3

I'd try for mounting into a joist. There's one joist that the box is mounted to, so might luck out and have one very close to where you want the lights and be able to put an eye screw into some wood. Otherwise, nothing wrong with toggle bolts or other similar drywall anchors that spread the weight over a small area.


3

Toggle bolts. Put them in the drywall on either end. There's no chance it will pull out. Let me expand on this by telling you a true story. I bought a house that had been reposessed by the bank. I can only assume the previous owners ransacked the place (even the fireplace mantle had been removed) and the bank had hired a contractor to come in and replace ...


3

Replace that goofy Edison socket with a coverplate for a receptacle. Now you have a dual receptacle that is switched by the garage light switch. Hang the lamps by chains. And then plug their plugs into the receptacle. It gives you the versatility to move the lights around to suit, and allows easy swap or addition of a fixture. Flexible cordage, as a ...


3

Most every mount I've seen has several holes through which it can be secured to studs. This is to account for different stud spacing, as well as allow for several lateral positions so that the TV is not off center. Double check your mount instructions, to ensure it will not accommodate your stud spacing. I'm very suspicious that the mount says it must be ...


3

I have a battery powered timer that is similar to what you have and it looked not so sturdy so I purchased a hose hanger like this and drilled 2 holes for the hose to enter and exit. The small storage space keeps the unit dry and out of site. It still looks new after 3 years. The second unit on the back side of the barn failed in less than 2 years (not ...


3

Quick version: You have metal studs. Install tips below. Long version: This is a good question with a lot of detailed information; kudos. Perhaps I am missing something, but the information provided leads to a clear conclusion IMHO. A building that tall built in the 90s in the US will have metal studs (99%+ chance?), so what you're finding matches ...


3

While there's no problem mounting things to particle board as others have described, 1/2" is just too thin to work with. I would mount another board under your desk using construction or wood glue, at least doubling the current thickness of the top. After that has set up for a day, I'd mount with 3/4" screws (or longer, depending on final thickness), ...


3

You do not need to be concerned, assuming that your lag screw is anchored into the framing. That's a result of a pre-existing gap behind the drywall. Maybe some insulation or a wrinkle in the vapor barrier held it out during initial hanging, and your lag screw pulled it in tight. Because there was a drywall screw there holding it out the surface bulged as ...


2

It looks like a "Triple Grip" brand anchor. I have similar anchors. The box says 77 pounds in 5/8 inch drywall. No specification for 1/2 inch. [


2

The best way to deal with this problem is to first mount a suitable piece of 3/4" plywood on the wall such that it spans to studs where it can be securely attached. The TV mount can then be mounted to the plywood using suitable screws that go into properly sized pilot holes. Note that face screwing into the plywood provides an excellent and strong mount ...


2

No... those expanding bolts aren't going to do the job, period. There are several reasons but suffice it to say your TV will find up on the floor. Toggle bolts of some variety are the preferred way to do it... it's hard to believe that no one in a city the size of yours has them or something more suitable. What you need is something that will spread the ...


2

I would fasten a "furring strip" (a piece of perhaps 2x2) to the wall at the top of the screen. Make it the same width as the screen, but screw it into the studs inside the wall (NOT just into the drywall sheet-rock) Then hang the screen from that. I would paint the strip black before installation to minimize visual interference. Depending on what kind of ...


2

The arched notches in the rear skirt are intended to accept heavy bolts with rubber pads and washers. Be sure that you have solid backing where the bolts will need to go. Install two-by lumber, wide face forward, between studs where needed. Be sure they're well anchored. Finish your room. Paint should be complete and well cured. Install the sink by ...


2

The plywood plan sounds fine. The lag bolts through the plywood into the studs need to be long enough to go through the plywood, through the drywall, and engage about 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" into the stud proper - not any further or you risk hitting electrical gear. For best results, pre-drill a hole into the stud somewhat smaller than the minor diameter (all-...


2

When I mount a shop light across unfinished joists, I just screw the fixture directly to the joists. My lights can be disassembled from the front, so I mounted the back plate first and then attached the front. I use at least four screws in a rectangle. This prevents wobbling. Some of my lights are parallel to the joists, so I placed 3" x 3/4" strips ...


2

You can see the angled mounting bracket hanging down under the sink. The bracket is what holds the sink firmly on the wall, the lower holes in the sink are for keeping the bottom of the sink from being pulled away and up from the wall once it is lowered down onto the bracket. The top holes have nothing to do with the mounting of the sink. The bracket ...


2

I know that your desire is to not mount any more wood but from the description that you gave it seems like the very best choice is to actually mount a 1x4 or 1x6 board across the width of the wall and screw into the various studs. Such board could even be full room width or at least longer than the backdrop width. If this board had the screw heads counter ...


1

I have exactly this scenario over my basement and garage workbenches. Just screw the fixture to the joists over the box so that the fixture is tight to the box. You can either move the box up flush with the bottom of the joist or add spacers behind the fixture where you place the screws. As long as everything is tight together and things can't move around ...


1

Yes, you'll be fine. The TV won't fall off the wall unless the drywall itself fails (i.e. water damage or earthquake) or someone hangs off of it.


1

If there are brackets (straps) on both sides about 1/3 of the way down from the top, then you could use S-hooks in the straps (remove the center clamping screw) and string a heavy steel wire between them. Then hook the wire on a heavy nail into a stud or use one of the new stronger hangers like a WingIt into drywall.


1

The rack is 28 inches wide. Its bound to be over at least one stud. How did you try to locate? Did you use a good stud finder? Look for hints for where a stud might be, like an electrical outlet below. (electrical boxes are usually mounted on a stud). Also a magnetic stud finder would find nails and screws. I would try again to find at least one stud and ...


1

Every time I have run across this problem I have taken a board about the same hight as the wall mount bracket and mounted the board across 3 studs. Then paint it the same color as the wall if necessary (most if not all of it will be hidden behind your massive TV anyways). 3 studs is probably way more than needed to hold the weight, but when hanging very ...


1

Given the bracket itself is threaded, assuming the screws hold firmly (eg: are correctly sized for the threads in the bracket, and the bracket is not stripped), I would install it without the nuts. The screws are transferring the shear load from the white cover to the metal bracket, which in turn is held to the ceiling box, which in turn (as other have ...


1

With respect to the mounting, if the back of the timer is flat, using a double sided foam tape would give you the ability to attach a plastic panel in which you can drill holes to bolt or screw the timer to the post. 3M Outdoor Mounting Tape is weather capable. I attached a sports logo to a motor vehicle for a friend with the stuff and it's been through a ...


1

I like Ed's suggestion as it offers some protection. In my experience, "waterproof" electronic gizmos don't tend to retain that quality after extended use. My first idea was to use a faucet on a post as your mounting hardware: You could then mount the timer directly to that, as shown in the product photos: Home Depot links for reference only.


1

It is not uncommon to hang one studs that are 24" apart so. I have a 60" TV hung on 24" studs. As long as the steel mount is spanned across two studs and securely fastened to the studs (with lag bolts), you'll be fine. Edit: Well, now that your answer says the specs are only for 16" studs (and after reading the specs, it shows the wall plate is only 21")...


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