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3

If you have a grout float a nice flat one that will work for pushing down Mosaic tiles into the thinset it because it's nice and flat and it'll leave your mosaics flat after you push down plus you can control much easier the amount of force you use to push down on them


3

Your thinset should be like peanut butter. If it is too thin then you could have possible issues with mosaics and flooring. Basically you could push down to bare floor or close to it. A 4mm trowel is perfect size for most mosaics. I think that your issue is that either you aren't combing the area well enough after dropping down your thinset or possibly ...


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The photos clearly show a terrible tile job. Tiles that are set crooked, tiles that are missing on the edge near the wall, grout lines of all different widths. If the tiles were that uneven on the mesh then i would not have purchased them. If i were the tile setter and they were that crooked i would have brought it to the attention of the home owner prior ...


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The reason for cement board is to give a good adhesion surface and to increase stability. When a floor flexes from the weight of people walking, or from movement of the house, grout and even the tiles themselves can crack. For a temporary platform intended for a cat box, you're not looking at a lot of weight causing flexing, so I doubt there'd be much ...


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There's nothing you can do to fix it short of tearing it out and starting over. Any sanding or grinding you might try will be even more evident in the difference in finish and texture. I doubt there is a significant difference in the thickness of the ledger panels. But even if their is, that's part of the job of a tile setter - compensating for materials ...


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Your first mistake was using the diamond pads. Part of the discoloration is stone dust being embedded in the concrete filler. You had a mold problem or staining from food/drinks being spilled. You should have started out with a non abrasive concrete / grout cleaner. You could have even used a mixture of beach and water. Try doing this and just work on the ...


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It sounds like a portland + sand mix (or bagged mortar mix) to mortar the tiles first might work. Fill the remaining form with concrete before the mortar sets so they can bond. A bit of vibration should help to fill in gaps. Not sure how well this would hold up to foot traffic over time.


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it is definitely not a tile thickness issue. I have never seen mosaic being off that much. If this is not a natural stone, the tiles would be super uniform. Even natural stones are cut precisely and we cannot pickup imperfections with the naked eye like this. it is happening on a straight line, thus most likely the cement boards are not being leveled. It ...


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That is unacceptable by all industry standards. I’d refer to the Tile Council of America’s website: http://www.tcnatile.com/tcna-handbook-committee.html TCA can review your installation, give guidelines, recommend installers, provide industry specifications, etc. Just click on the red band near the top of the page. I see what you see: 1) uneven grout ...


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Whatever you end up doing to cover the area you should first take steps to completely remove the previous cat smell. Cat's have sensitive noses and if a new cat can smell even a trace of the previous smell they will get the immediate idea that it is OK to urinate in that area again. There are cleaners that work really well at removing the smell after you ...


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I've never done or heard of this, but most of my small tile work has been with presheeted tiles I did read about a mosaic system where the layout was done face up and a mesh was attached, and the tile was thin-setted and afterwards grouted. I've also seen a TOH segment where the mosaic was attached to a thin cement board (1/4"), grouted and then the whole ...


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Not sure if this should be a comment or an answer. You will need something on top of the concrete but under the radiant tubing to reflect the heat upward. They do make a metal coated wood for that purpose that has channels already routed out for the tubing. It will ad to the height of your new finished floor. I assume your concrete is on top of earth or ...


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Clarification from the manufacturer: "Natural stone should be sealed prior to grouting. A premium penetrating sealer is recommended for a natural look. A stone enhancing sealer can be applied to darken or highlight the features of the stone. The sealer is safe to apply over the entire mosaic with the glass."


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Trowel - This depends on your substrate. If I am going on perfect straight backer board I might go 1/8", for drywall or not perfect go with 1/4". You should notch horizontally. Actually it doesn't matter if you do it right but horizontal will help them from falling initially. Nippers... No way. You will need a wet saw or angle grinder with diamond blade....


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Make a weak acid solution using Muriatic Acid (pool acid) and water in a 5 gal. plastic bucket, 1 cup:gallon. Using gauntlet type chem gloves and eye protection, scrub with acid. Use a grout sponge to rinse and wipe clean, using clean water and wringing frequently. Repeat until all excess mortar and haze is gone. Note: above method is effective for removing ...


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Once the initial set/superficial hardening has taken place, water should not be a problem. Excess water is a big problem when it can still alter the mix of the cement or wash it away - after that, it won't have much effect. On the other hand, it will be difficult to "dry the steps well" with water trapped under the tiles, so covering would probably make ...


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Unless you're going to be getting a lot of heavy traffic on these stairs (like dragging things up and down them), you should be fine without putting a nose on them. As long as the tile is set and grouted properly these aren't going to go anywhere. Just to give an idea of the longevity and wear resistance, there's a house near where I live that was built in ...


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Absolutely. Those tiny tiles will chip or pop off as soon as somebody smacks it with something. I assume you are thinking of some nosing like this and where I live, I would certainly go with something with some grip. Not knowing what kind of traffic the stairs get and what your climate is like (how often it freezes - how often they are wet), it's hard to ...


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Its likely the box itself is recessed and the ears of the outlet is sitting on top of the tile, connected by longish screws. The solution is to break off the ears and recess as needed. Spacers may be needed if the box is too deep. Similarly, a box extender should be used if there is a gap between the wall and the box. Without plaster ears With ears


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Generally, it is possible to turn off the power, remove the switch, and then cut the nails that are holding the box in place (a recip saw can do this if you are careful). You can then drill holes through the box, push it so that it is flush, and then screw the box back to the stud. This is fairly finicky work.


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