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All wood products are loaded with mold spores. I work in a lumber mill all the lumber is sprayed with a fungicide to stunt the growth for a month or two. When the wood is dry and not exposed to moisture there will be no growth. There hundreds of different types of mold and only a few are hazardous, so yes there is mold and fungi in your wood. Do you need to ...


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Bleach only temporarily kills mold. Peroxide actually kills it. Ozone machines kill it as well. Be very careful to not breathe the spores that rise when you clean mold. Mold is dangerous for your health. Wear a mask and soak it in peroxide first.


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I like 3% hydrogen peroxide to kill mold. It doesn’t stink like bleach and won’t be a problem to seal over once dry.


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Oh man! Linseed oil, that's food for mold and mildew. Behr was sued for advertising their finish as mildew resistant but didn't include Linseed oil in the ingredient list even though it was well known that linseed oil is food for mildew. I had a cabin with cedar siding that the Behr finish was applied to. It molded and mildewed FROM WITHIN the finish, ...


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Spray the area with some vinegar and let it sit or 30 to 60 minutes, then wipe off with a cloth or sponge. Vinegar is better than bleach for killing mold because it soaks in below the surface to kill the mold roots. Bleach only takes care of the surface mold. I have used it on my stained deck and it has always worked great and didn't affect the wood color.


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You’re right...we avoid two layers of vapor barriers, but that is for walls, ceilings, etc. with material in between the vapor barriers that can have moisture in the lumber or trap moisture within the void space as heat transfer the walls, ceilings and reaches it Dew Point. In this instance you are “sealing” the DRY rubber underlayment. (Emphasis on “dry”.)...


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This equipment (water bottle cut open, hose and hairdryer) is giving protection also in case of putting parts covered with fungi into plastic bags: https://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/182964/how-to-keep-the-dust-down-when-sawing-indoors-in-the-dead-of-winter


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Toxins from fungi can definitely become airborne. When removing them, since you have a lot of items, use a N95 respirator just to play it safe. Place items in a large plastic bag and seal the bag before placing it in your car. As a common courtesy, let the people at the recycling facility know about the fungi.


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Respirators are more typically used for preventing inhalation of gaseous contaminants which aren't filtered by simple fabric masks. They force air through media which entrap those gases. While they will also catch particulates, they're usually overkill for situations with just that concern. In your case, both silica dust and mold spores are particulates, ...


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When a tile is broken in this case the wall board is compromised. I would want to remove it and retile. Prior to the 70’s tile over water resistant Sheetrock was quite common less common was tile over standard Sheetrock. When it cracks as yours has yes it can be repaired, mold would not be my first concern but can be treated with 3% hydrogen peroxide. ...


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Start out by using a pry bar and snapping the tiles off the drywall. This way you'll avoid cracking and breaking them up. Then remove the drywall by just pulling it off the studs. Then you'll have to go back and pull out all the screws and nails. Hopefully the framing studs will not have to be removed and you can just treat them with some vinegar to kill the ...


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