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0

That fungal growth is probably not going to harm you but it'll ruin the stuff you put in that cupboard. Now as a landlord, I've seen quite a bit of this stuff and it can have several causes. First suspect is the tenant. For example I visit this guy to get his check, and he's cooking some pasta. While the pasta cooks, we talk, drink a coffee and he rolls a ...


-2

The stuff on the clothes looks like some sort of splatter to me. The stuff on the shoes and sandals is probably "house dust". The stuff on the wall is dust that was drawn there by the nearby air vent.


4

All of the answers here are great! Taking a noteworthy but slightly different angle on answering it: Is it safe? I agree with everyone given the pictures you showed that it doesn't seem bad, but there is plenty we cannot see. So I always give the default "we can't know" but we can give you a good guess. How is the rest of the place and is this ...


5

Yes it is mold. However it doesn't appear to be growing. It looks like the apartment had a water issue and it wasn't dried very quickly. This surface mold can be cleaned up from most things pretty quickly with soap and water - includes walls too. I would thoroughly clean everything, air things out, start a fan, and then reassess after a few weeks. For ...


4

While you're checking out where the moisture's coming from, try a few of the desiccant products available at your home stores to absorb the excess moisture. You'll be amazed at how well they work. The one pictured below I used and placed in my closet where some mildew was growing due to a leak in the cinder block wall. It really absorbed the moisture in the ...


4

I'd get a dehumidifier. Areas that don't have good air circulation like closets are more effected. What kind of heating system is your apartment on? Mold needs food (dust works) and moisture. Moisture issues typically arise when heating is insufficient, exhaust fans are not being used, or other sources of moisture are allowed to accumulate (wet bicycles ...


18

Looks more like mildew, which is related to mold, but not as dangerous (from a health standpoint). Yes, a dehumidifier could help prevent mildew. I would also look for sources of the moisture, e.g. a clothes dryer that is not venting to the outside, a bathroom vent that is not functioning (or non-existent), water leaking somewhere etc.


1

Spray bleach on it ;it will pretty much disappear if it is mold. Assuming it is not so thick that one application of bleach is insufficient . There will clearly be a difference in appearance although a few applications of bleach may be required.


1

There is no way for us to tell for sure. It looks like mold to me and that's a strange place for dirt to just accumulate. So lets play it safe. Get a spray bottle of white distilled vinegar and spray the area thoroughly. The vinegar is great for killing not only surface mold but also going below the surface to the roots. Let the vinegar sit for an hour and ...


0

I would do several things at the same time. To stop the mold you need to take the moisture away. So a dehumidifier will take the moisture out of the air as the air is dryer the surfaces off gas more moisture making it harder or impossible for the mold to grow. I would also spray any surface with 3% hydrogen peroxide and water. If you have really large areas ...


0

How bout sistering (on both sides) aluminum 2 by 4s and remove a couple feet of the wood 2 by 4 off the bottom as it may get wet again anyway.


3

Dry it out well after it has thawed, and use a desiccant (moisture absorber) inside. I wouldn't consider it safe from mold without that.


1

Yes, if the freezer has been unplugged long enough to melt and drain any accumulated frozen condensation, it would be safe to use as storage with the door/lid open. Because it is a mostly airtight environment, it is not suitable for closed long-term storage unless significant ventilation is added by drilling holes or leaving the door/lid open.


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