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35

Yeah, that advice was super wrong. Moisture encourages mold growth. After a water leak you need to go to extremes to dry the air to get wet things to evaporate into the air, which you then continue to dry. I would run dehumidifiers, or shoot, if your house has A/C, just run the A/C since that is a dehumidifier. The only risk is if you excessively ...


16

You are being sold. The evaporator coil in the AC condenses water vapor in the air. It does this by blowing the warm air from your home over the cool evaporator coil. The cool coil pulls the moisture from the indoor air, removing it and draining it from your home via the condensate array. This happens with every air conditioning cycle. If the AC unit can't ...


13

It is possible for A/C to cause mold issues but it depends on a few factors. The problem is this: when choosing a A/C unit for a home, often people (even 'professionals') will assume that bigger is better. The installer plugs in the numbers to the manufacturers model and comes up with a recommended unit size, then bumps it up to a larger one. The problem ...


4

I've been in no less than 300 attics and every one of then has had dust, grey dust, in them. Your attic has soffits installed to vent the attic. You also have vent pipes going through the roof to vent caps that allow some backdraft into the attic. If you've ever had your roof redone, stuff will be knocked down. Mold needs a fare amount of moisture and most ...


4

This old house has an excellent video on why the soffit location is bad, and how to vent through a common shingle roof. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqrZWd_CQIE How to Vent a Bath Fan Through the Roof, August 2014. The homeowner installed the same way your contractor did, and in just one season there was mold under the roof. Your contractor should pay ...


3

You would want to use a bi metal hole saw. You are right to not want to use a wood only hole saw, the teeth tend to grab, not cut. Try something like this: Good luck.


3

This looks like fungal growth to me. Specifically, it looks like the “roots” of honey fungus. I’ve seen this before on a stack of old PT lumber I had sitting outside for a few years.


3

From what I can tell from the photo, it looks more like rust than mould. I'd wash off the loose dirt first to be sure though.


2

Looks like some surface mildew. That's pretty common in a high humidity area like a bathroom. Blot the stains with some equal parts of water and bleach on a rag, followed by blotting with a plain water rag and let it dry. If you still see it, repeat the process. The bleach will kill the mildew and help to remove any staining left behind. If you still have ...


2

As you can see the factory prints information on each sheet during the manufacturing process. Occasionally there is an error and ink is splattered during the time the sheet is passing through the conveyor getting trimmed,stamped,edges painted,etc... Looking at your first picture we see the pattern of black spots stops at the joint between two sheets. That ...


2

Yes that is mold and it's very common bathrooms. Yes you can try to remove it yourself. Make a bleach solution with 1 tablespoon bleach and 1 cup warm water with 1-2 drops of soap. Dish washing soap is fine. Put on eye protection. Use an old toothbrush to scrub at the mold to remove it. The soap should help remove the mold and the bleach will help kill ...


2

What that needs is a good scrubbing with warm soapy water. If the paint comes off because it is old or because it is no longer durable enough to survive a good scrubbing... then it needed repainting anyway. Use a high quality gloss or semi-gloss paint if you do it.


2

Obviously the root problem is too much humidity in that area and fixing that properly would mean adding ventilation to get the warm and moist air outside. Short of that, I can think of two things you might do: Clean the area with a chlorine bleach solution (not 100% bleach) but something like 1 cup to a gallon of water. Wear gloves as this will burn your ...


2

I would try one of two ways: a) use a small drill bit 1/4" perhaps, and drill holes just inside the edge of the desired circle. The use tin snips or a dremel tool. Cutting the entire thing with Dremel isn't going to work unless you have a LOT of cutting wheels at your disposal. or b) just drill one 3/8-1/2" bit at the edge. The use a jigsaw with metal ...


1

I think you should remove all the silicone then use a bit of bleach to clean the area well to kill any remaining mold. Let it dry thoroughly and then put a new bead of silicone there. You mention this is a rental property. You may want to talk with the landlord about this. If there is mold, then water is getting behind the silicone and potentially causing ...


1

The streaks are actually strips of "clean" or at least cleaner than the surroundings. Unless adjacent to a kitchen, or the room used by smokers the dirt is unlikely to have an oil component. Try the following: Hot water (as hot as you can stand with kitchen gloves on) and laundry detergent. This is generally good for the mix of dust and water that is ...


1

White distilled vinegar works great. Just put it in a spray bottle and spray on to the moldy surface. Wait an hour and then wipe down surface with water. I used to use bleach but it only really works on non porous surfaces. Does your bathroom vent well? Try to determine the cause of the mold and fix it. Also, don't let it build up until the next ...


1

I'd expect you don't have much to worry about. Mould isn't great but it exists outside in the nice fresh air as well. There are some moulds that are quite toxic but you'd need to do air sampling to find out if you have high enough levels of spores to pose any health concerns. Are you sure you even have mould and not algae? There are cases where you ...


1

It looks like mold / mildew yes it can be killed with a bleach & water solution or a hydrogen peroxide and water mixture. Is it the “bad stuff” only testing will reveal that but to tell the truth that doesn’t look that bad. But killing it and keeping the area dry, making sure the vent fan is on when using the shower / bath will help get the moisture out ...


1

While the high temps typically used in a dishwasher will kill a lot of life and will probably suceed in doing so with this dish, no you should do something to it first. The dishwashers instructions certainly advise you to essentially clean dishes before putting them into the dishwasher. Anytime food or other "solid matter" is left on a dish, it will go to ...


1

If it was a toilet ring, you can be sure that it gradually started leaking longer than two weeks beforehand. It takes sometimes weeks before a slow leak accumulates enough water and softens the gypsum board enough to leak down to the ceiling below. There may very well be mould above in the ceiling space. This should be investigated asap and the appropriate ...


1

There are various mold-inhibiting primers such as Kilz and Zinsser (links shown only as examples). If there is still visible stain, wash with dilute bleach and let dry. Apply the mold-inhibiting primer appropriate for your paint type (oil, latex, etc.). Paint with with your choice of material.


1

My mom puts a silver dollar in hers, I think they need to be pre 1960's to have enough silver she says the silver kills stuff naturally (she also puts one in the pitcher in the fridge for drinking water) she has done this for years and swears by it.


1

To me it looks like water leaking on the sheetrock above. If that is a vent fan on the edge of the photo I would want that on a timer that continues for 15 minutes after use (required in my area) this extra time drys the pipe out it could be water leaking from the vent pipe or duct. If it is mold the extra fan time would reduce the humidity in the bathroom ...


1

Mold (mildew) reproduces quickly. Once it starts growing it travels to other areas via the wind current. Once it lands on another surface it will begin growing there and the cycle continues. Mold requires a food source, the correct temperature and most of all it needs moisture. The recent rain might have something to do with it. Most mildew issues are from ...


1

The plastic will reduce the moisture, bare cinder block walls are almost always damp, there may be a drain tile at the base of the wall to take the moisture away, I would leave the plastic in place. I have rarely found dry cinder block basements so this will be something to watch. A dehumidifier will help dry things out and prevent mold growth. Making sure ...


1

The advice to remove water before it comes in is sound but if you run a dehumidifier and the rest of the house isn't extremely tight, it seems unlikely that insulating the attic is going to cause a major difference overall. It really isn't a problem that your land is flat. The grade required is very sight because the actual drainage will be to a pipe. If ...


1

Fire your contractor. The tiles aren't set square, the grout lines look HUGE, and the grout is discolored. Caulk the entire perimeter. You might allow a 1 inch horizontal gap on each side for a weep hole as suggested by @freshop.


1

If you're building a proper sauna (Finnish sauna) and using it correctly, there should be no moisture problem in it. The air you feed it initially has the same humidity as the surrounding air, then the stove raises the air temperature leading to a decrease in relative humidity (same water content by weight + higher temperature = lower relative humidity, RH%)....


1

Yes, that's definitely black mold. Mold doesn't take a lot of water to grow, but from the looks of it that one is still actively growing. The brownish hose in the picture looks like clear vinyl tubing. If that's a drain extension, where does the main hose end, right at the wall flashing? Could the joint between these two be leaking into the wall? Or if ...


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