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34

Is my cabinet maker correct They are right that drilling clean holes in glass is more difficult than in wood or steel. In my opinion, they are not right to say that visible cracking around the hole is normal. They are a professional and part of the price they charge is for having the skill, experience and tools to do the job better and quicker than you ...


28

I used to work for a company that built machines that drilled these holes (though we did it in much larger pieces, usually 3/4" to 2" thickness). It's not a hard process, it's slightly expensive, but it's doable. The process is basically as follows: Use two diamond-tipped drill bits to cut the hole (one above and one below); Use a water-jet to push water ...


19

Mirror clips are made for exactly this purpose. Plain or fancy as fits your decor and/or budget.


14

If that mirror has a wooden frame you can attach picture hanging brackets. the frame looks to be about 10mm thick which is plenty.


12

If the mirror doesn't weigh much more than 15 pounds, you could use some Command picture hanging strips (such as these or these). They're easy to install and relatively inexpensive.


10

Why, of course! You're looking for a "magnetic catch". Just you should possibly install it the other way around - a metal plate on the wall, and the catch screwed on the mirror. Images added: Magnet mounted as plug in the cabinet with large head screw contact Magnet in cup washer and mating contact washer mounted with screws Thin magnet to metal plate


9

The level of cracking you're showing on the left is not normal. There is some roughness around the hole on the right which is generally normal. Actually, the hole on the right is, more or less, what it should look like when you drill a mirror or any glass. This is one of those skills that takes practice to become consistently good at. As for replacing the ...


9

Another option is a french cleat. You really, really, don't want mirrors to fall off the wall. They shatter and explode and if there is any biological unit in the area they are likely to get cut (not to mention any heart attacks from the explosion or the seven years bad luck). You can buy one (e.g.: https://www.amazon.com/Hangman-Z-Hanger-Mirror-Picture-...


8

From my days installing car film, I have two basic suggestions. Get off the floor. You can't work down there without dust being blown into your workpiece every time you move. Get up on a table in a room without a lot of human or pet traffic, where the air remains still. Most installations are on the window in a wall anyway. Use plenty of solution. You don'...


8

I mounted a similar mirror to a wall by drilling symmetrically-spaced holes through the frame (about one per six inches of frame perimeter) and screwing the mirror directly to the drywall using appropriate-length black phosphate coarse thread drywall screws. In my case the the holes in the frame were acceptable, and due to the dark red-brown color of the ...


7

First really look for the watermarks. These are usually ultrafaint in a corner. They could even be upside down. Second look for any chips on the edges. If there are chips it isn't tempered. Third if you need the hole just drill it. Use the smallest bit you have to start and work your way to the size you need. Wear gloves but putting a tiny hole in ...


6

You'll probably have an easier time using a picture hanger than a screw, and it will leave your wall in better shape when you remove it. Picture hangers transfer the downward force into pressure into the wall because the nail is mounted at an angle. The screw, on the other hand, is being bent because you're acting as a lever, where the stud is the fulcrum, ...


5

Screws You might consider double headed nails or screws. I like screws, since nails can work out of the wall. The link below would be a good style, and the last pic shows exactly how it would work with your mirror. This style also allows for adding D-rings, wire, or sawtooth hangers (even though the "artist" is wrong about the orientation of the sawtooth ...


4

This is a part of a security hanger set: Security Hanger Set Two of the straps you have pictured go on the top of the mirror, and the clips on the right side of the picture go on the wall and hook into the straps. One strap is installed in the bottom center of the mirror and the T-shaped screw in the center of the picture gets installed in the wall ...


4

Mirror clips come in many thickness sizes. Choose one with adequate gap to mirror and use _|— to fasten with exposed screw, but allow mirror to be flush. Use a small < 1cm square double sided tape in middle if it bulges out but permits removal.


3

If it's very long, I'd suspect that it's being physically distorted during the installation process since the glass itself is flexible enough to distort the image without breaking first. To correct it, you need to make sure that the mirror is as straight as possible - use shims. If it's along a wall, the mirror may be following the contours of a slightly ...


3

I think in this case the best solution is to use a timber profile - L shape trim. You stick it on the edge with some liquid nails glue and so it covers the wall from one side and goes over a mirror edge on the other the ones in the middle in the picture


3

I had 30 mirror tiles to remove on a wall up a stairwell. Tried a hammer and it bounced off. Had to give it a real hard blow before I could break a tile and then it shattered into 1000's of bits. Next I tried scoring the tile with a glass cutter then prying behind it with a strong putty-like lnife (blade 4 inches long and about 1 inch wide)until it broke on ...


3

A high-quality #12 or #14 pan-head screw (or the metric equivalent) of 2" length or more will carry that with no problem when mounted in a stud through 1/2" drywall. For hollow-wall scenarios, such as drywall, use a substantial anchor rated for more than the weight you wish to hang, that grasps the drywall from the inside, such as a toggler (Pop Toggle ...


3

Clear silicone caulk or project adhesive (in marble-sized dabs at intervals--tape in place for 12 hours) Double-sided foam mounting tape Hot glue Trim nails (into framing, not just drywall)


3

How about a glass shower door, a combination of clear and frosted glass? They can be ordered to size and are not expensive. If glass doors are not an option, you can install one or more battery operated led lights in the shower (see enclosed picture).


3

You can get light and privacy both See, when you speak of transparency, you're actually talking about 2 wildly separate things. Light can come through it --versus- An observable image can come through it If you've ever used your car's defogger, you know how you can have one and not the other. There was plenty of light, but you couldn't see. This answer ...


3

Mirrors are often mounted simply using double-sided adhesive tape. Just google "adhesive tape mirror", and you'll find a lot of products from all brands. You'll find those in your local depot, too. Just be aware that there are two kind of double-sided tape: one that is very thin, and one that is thicker (~2mm), with a core made of foam. If the wall surface ...


3

Is your wall made of cake? That first picture looks like cake. But seriously, look at the plastic anchor your tried to put in that hole and compare it to another one. I think you will find that the used one is broken. What happened is you screwed that anchor in to a stud, and it broke, leaving plastic behind. Drywall anchors are used to hang things on ...


3

Cutting or drilling a hole in a mirror is something that takes either very specialized tools that are not easily available, or an EXTREME amount of luck. If you have a high speed rotary tool, like a Dremel, and a diamond encrusted bit made for grinding glass, you might get lucky. Do NOT breath the dust that comes off of that.


3

Get a 100mm angle grinder and stick a smooth 100mm diamond wheel on it, you should be able to plunge cut the slots needed to remove the extra piece of glass wear a dust mask, ear and eye protection, go slowly brace against the wall pr mirrior with your elbows and use both hands to steady grinder keep the blade straight when cutting. wipe down all ...


3

Craigslist (or equivalent) "free mirror, broken frame" with pictures. Or a low price, which sometimes works better than free even without the aspect below... or Set beside the street, sign "free" (if that does not work, set a price and hope someone steals it now that it has value, or be pleasantly surprised if someone actually pays the price. Or just start ...


2

If you can feel the scratch with your finger nail then there is a good chance that it is too deep to remove by yourself, but you can certainly try! Removing scratches from glass is similar to removing them from car paint - you use a polishing compound (made for glass) and ideally an orbital polisher to try and remove the scratch (lots of muscle power works ...


2

Is the mirror one piece or is it made of tiles? Is it glued in place or supported by clips, brackets, or a frame? If it is mounted (clips, brackets, or frame) carefully unmount it, have it professionally cut, and then remount it. I strongly advise hiring a professional window or glass man to do this. If it is glued but is made of tiles: Locate a supply ...


2

You could mount support bars on the walls that touch the ends of the shelves. The bars should be screwed into studs that form the framing of the inset walls. Square tubing, either aluminum or steel would do well. The shelves would need to be fairly thick. They would have a slot (dado) cut into in the middle of the end edges, slightly wider that the ...


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