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There should be no problem assuming that you leave adequate clearance around the unit. Any appliance becomes a fire risk if there's flammable junk piled against it. Also be diligent about vacuuming up lint and dust. The microwave's cooling fan will draw in more debris in a clothes closet than it probably would in a kitchen. You might blow it out ...


4

Microwaves work by exciting the molecules in liquids that then trasfer their heat into surrounding materials. To be safe, "microwavable" products have water in them so that the water molecules are what heats up. If you use a product not designed for this, you could end up volatizing (vaporizing) VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) that are not only harmful, ...


4

Nope Nope, nope, nope. This is called paralleling and there are several sections of NEC dedicated to it. It has at least a half dozen requirements. This reuse scheme violates nearly all of them: 1/0 or larger wire supply-side distribution cabinet specifically designed for paralleling supplying cabinet from one source same size conductors equal length ...


4

As far as 40 vs. 50 - that depends on the manufacturer's requirements. The installation instructions clearly state: A 50 Amp circuit breaker with wire gauge #8 AWG must be used. So there you have it. 50 Amp - not 40 Amp. 8 AWG - not smaller. You can, of course, use larger wire - e.g., 6 AWG - that is always OK. But you can't use a smaller breaker - my ...


3

"while moving it's door came out" That's the key. A microwave oven is an extremely safe device as long as the door is closed when in use. It is an extremely dangerous device if it is used with the door open. In order to make absolutely certain that nobody will ever turn on a microwave oven with the door open, there are normally multiple interlocks or ...


3

Toss It! I am absolutely not in favor of throwing any useful stuff. See the clutter around my house and you'll agree :-) But a microwave oven is a potentially very dangerous item. A conventional oven (from toaster on up to self-cleaning convection wall oven) has two main hazards: Electricity - There are numerous safeguards in place including GFCI for plug-...


2

There are three kinds of microwave ovens: Countertop - rely on airflow typically on sides, back or bottom Over-the-cooktop - typically include a fan underneath for cooktop ventilation and may use the same airflow path to also provide ventilation for the microwave oven Wall Oven - like a typical wall oven, does not rely on any ventilation except in the front....


2

The heating element in a microwave is controlled by the control board. It's not as simple as a stuck external relay. It would seem that the board is fried. A microwave is essentially an easy bake oven that heats with an extremely intense light in a wavelength we can't see. The "bulb" is called a magnatron and it can output enough heat to severely burn you ...


2

Assuming you are in the US, and that when you speak of an electric oven you are referring to one of the electric toaster type ovens that sit on the counter. Is that correct? If so, you can used the same outlet for both, and convert it to a double outlet so you can have both plugged in at the same time. However, both devices draw a good bit of current when in ...


2

As said in a reply I made to one of those earlier questions that you linked some microwaves have the switches arranged so that they will short across the mains input voltage through the fuse if they do not sequence properly. This scheme allows a lot of current to flow through the switch contacts for those that perform the shorting function till the fuse ...


2

It should be safe as long as you unplug the microwave oven when not in use (or use a switched outlet). The reason for this is that there is usually much more dust and lint inside a walk-in closet than there is in a kitchen. All the highly inflammable material gets deposited and compacted by the forced cooling air circulation (virtually every MW as a fan) ...


2

While most appliance mounts are deliberately over-engineered, leaving out two out of three support bolts seems to be a bit risky. There might be another solution. If you have enough clearance over the stovetop, you might lower the mounting of the microwave overall, maybe 3/4 of an inch. Premount the front of the microwave to a strip of 3/4 inch plywood that ...


2

The red circled parts appear to be microswitches, labeled 1) and 2). Part numbers are circled in yellow. I think that they are behind the slots in the faceplate, circled in blue. They are activated by the two latches on the door, circled in green. (copied from previous page) One of the latches may not be engaging a switch because of a disconnected spring....


2

Typical microwave ovens will have multiple micro switches that are designed to provide safe use of the unit. Safe use translates to making sure the door is closed before the unit is able to produce the microwave energy. The safety feature is normally designed so that the multiple switches have to sequence on/off properly when the when the microwave door is ...


1

Most microwave ovens have a physical interlock preventing opening the door while cooking (i.e. while the magnetron is running). This is to prevent injury to people, since being irradiated with ~1,000 watts of microwave energy is not good for your health. With the door closed, the oven should radiate no more than 5 mW, but with it open you'd get about 200,...


1

Depends on the hood. Some come with a telescopic shroud, to go bigger, but not smaller. Check the dimensions on the box. Whatever the small dimension is, has to be able to fit. Or open the box to see how much of the shroud you could cut off, having grabbed an elbow from another isle in the store to see the ultimate clearance requirements when assembled. ...


1

3/4" plywood is plenty strong enough. The issue is the brackets. They need to be very strong and, most importantly, mounted directly into studs. I would not rely on anything less - toggle bolts, expandable anchors, etc. Screws into studs. It may be a bit tough to find the studs - I'm not sure if a regular stud finder will work through the tile. If you're ...


1

Your oven is damaged and the safety features which protect you from harm are stopping the oven from working. If you try to fix this without skill or understanding you may create a dangerous hazard that may cause harm to you or other people. See US FDA Microwave Oven Radiation Have Radiation Injuries Resulted from Microwave Ovens? there have been ...


1

Danger! Working hot is problematic, especially if you are not a pro. Rental A rental is not the same as owning your home. For the same reason the electrician owner had to pay someone else instead of doing it himself, you shouldn't be doing any real electrical work here either. Use As Designed & Tested Most current models of over-the-stove microwave ...


1

It's possible the newest units are simply not made for a 3-prong receptacle (and that would be reasonable since grounds are important to protect electronics from people). In that case, and regardless for safety, you have the ability to retrofit ground. This involves running a #10 bare wire via any achievable route back to any of several locations: the ...


1

Replacing is NOT a good option for some models--Repairs are NOT that hard. Hate to offer this advice, since I've heard of quite a few DIY that have been killed attempting this, since the power is, or can be still stored in the capacitor of the microwave, and KILL you dead, WHEN unplugged! Still, you can DIY or find a friend that can easily do this. OTOH, ...


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