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26

There should be no problem assuming that you leave adequate clearance around the unit. Any appliance becomes a fire risk if there's flammable junk piled against it. Also be diligent about vacuuming up lint and dust. The microwave's cooling fan will draw in more debris in a clothes closet than it probably would in a kitchen. You might blow it out ...


6

Depends on if it was expensive, if it is mounted, and how much the one you'd buy would cost. (and install) Encountered a similar problem, once it was a safety switch for the door, another time it was a burnt out magnetron. Worth replacing either on a $600+ unit. $200? Just buy a nice new clean one.


5

Microwaves go in the kitchen. I would suggest that it is up in a higher spot so kids can't play with them. That is a good reason they are often over ovens along with the venting. Also from an electric point of view almost all microwaves require a 12A dedicated circuit. For a kitchen you will probably have several runs like this and it is just bundled ...


4

Buy a new microwave. It sounds like your microwave door is pretty cattywampus. Microwaves are carefully engineered and undergo extensive testing to ensure radiation is kept in, and are typically not intended to be user serviceable. Even a very small leak could have serious health consequences over time. Finally, if you are able to replace a door, you still ...


4

Don't do it. Microwaves, while safe, emit a significant radiation that is controlled, in part, by a carefully designed door interlock system. If it is compromised, there is a risk of radiation leakage. You don't fix microwave doors, you send it back for them to fix or you replace the entire unit. Period. SUPPLEMENT The World Health Organization (WHO) ...


4

I would just get a new microwave. Almost assuredly this is cheaper/better in the long run. I might consider having it fixed if two conditions were met - that I generally knew what was wrong and if I knew someone that I could really trust. The fact is having someone fix something so specialized that you really can't see or check yourself is hardly ever a ...


4

You are better off mounting it to the studs. If there's no studs near the edge then I would add a toggle there.


4

Microwaves work by exciting the molecules in liquids that then trasfer their heat into surrounding materials. To be safe, "microwavable" products have water in them so that the water molecules are what heats up. If you use a product not designed for this, you could end up volatizing (vaporizing) VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) that are not only harmful, ...


4

As far as 40 vs. 50 - that depends on the manufacturer's requirements. The installation instructions clearly state: A 50 Amp circuit breaker with wire gauge #8 AWG must be used. So there you have it. 50 Amp - not 40 Amp. 8 AWG - not smaller. You can, of course, use larger wire - e.g., 6 AWG - that is always OK. But you can't use a smaller breaker - my ...


4

Nope Nope, nope, nope. This is called paralleling and there are several sections of NEC dedicated to it. It has at least a half dozen requirements. This reuse scheme violates nearly all of them: 1/0 or larger wire supply-side distribution cabinet specifically designed for paralleling supplying cabinet from one source same size conductors equal length ...


3

You can actually repair this knob with resin + fiberglas. You can see the final result here. Hope it helps.


3

"Don't do that" I'm not saying that you should not repair your microwave, but as a general rule, I would not recommend it: Careless troubleshooting of a microwave oven can result in death or worse. Experienced technicians have met their maker as a result of a momentary lapse of judgement while testing an oven with the cover removed. Microwave ovens ...


3

That's a plasma arc sound. Clean the interior of the oven thoroughly Remove the cardboard, paper or mica cover over the hole that the microwaves pass into the oven, and clean in there too. Clean that little cover itself. Turn the over on and look for light sources inside, other than the lightbulb. Those are likely balls of glowing plasma. Clean around them ...


3

Most microwave ovens will generate arcs and sparks inside their cavity if they are run with an insufficient load, or no load whatsoever. The high-frequency content from these arcs is being coupled (likely capacitively) through the HV transformer section of your microwave onto the AC line, where the AFCI can then see it and proceed to freak out, thinking the ...


3

I have hung a few of this type of microwave, not this particular brand or model, all required the bolts through the upper cabinet. Understandably so, that is a lot of weight hanging off of a thin stamped metal plate.


3

I just hung a Whirlpool OTR microwave and attaching to the upper cabinet is a requirement. The lower bracket supports the back of the microwave, but does not keep it from rotating down. When you install the microwave, you put the back end on the bracket, rotate it up so that the top of the microwave touches the bottom of the cabinet, then hold it while ...


3

Somewhere on the magnetron is a thermal fuse or cutoff. When the magnetron gets to hot, it shuts off power to the device. Some of these fuses reset once the device cools, some don't. Sounds like you have one of the later. You can replace the fuse, temp rating is usually written on the device itself. While you're in there, clean the cooling fins on your ...


3

Years ago I had experience with helping an electronics shop owner next door to my office fix a similar problem. The problem turned out to be alignment of the micro switches which were all on plates with adjustment slider holes. On his unit the door interlock micro switches had an interesting contact arrangement with wiring such that when the switches ...


3

If the metal grid in the door is intact and the outer metal case it should be fine, one way I have seen used was to clip the leads off a neon lamp if the lamp flashes it is getting hit by microwave radiation. Or to buy a detector. Depending on the amount of energy being released it can be a simple warming effect to burning, the eyes would be at the biggest ...


3

Simply wave a fluorescent tube around the micro when on, any leaks will illuminate the tube. Of course, if you find something, get it replaced ASAP. The radiation is not the cancer-causing ionizing radiation, but it can easily damage the blood vessels in your eyes and cause other minor burns. EDIT: I should mention that skin burns, even minor ones, raise ...


3

It's not really surprising that an example of the lightweight sheet metal that passes for an appliance these days is askew. I'd have done just what you did, assuming that there are no signs of damage or faulty assembly. As long as the turntable functions smoothly there's no concern with it being slightly out of level, if it still is.


3

"while moving it's door came out" That's the key. A microwave oven is an extremely safe device as long as the door is closed when in use. It is an extremely dangerous device if it is used with the door open. In order to make absolutely certain that nobody will ever turn on a microwave oven with the door open, there are normally multiple interlocks or ...


3

Toss It! I am absolutely not in favor of throwing any useful stuff. See the clutter around my house and you'll agree :-) But a microwave oven is a potentially very dangerous item. A conventional oven (from toaster on up to self-cleaning convection wall oven) has two main hazards: Electricity - There are numerous safeguards in place including GFCI for plug-...


2

A non contact voltage tester should detect voltage on any energized terminal or power cord. The tip will glow red when close to an energized power terminal or power cord. Just have an assistant hold the tester against some part of the oven or power cord that shows that power is present, then toggle the breakers until it turns off. Be careful inside the oven ...


2

I have installed a couple of these. I don't see how it could possibly hang from just the wall without support from above. If you don't have a cabinet above it, then you need some creative ideas, like maybe constructing a shelf with diagonal bracing back to the wall. If you post a picture of the area, I'm sure the users on SE could come up with something.


2

NO, you cannot install in a 24" cabinet. Minimum clearances stated in the installation instructions need to be followed or the manufacturer safety certifications will be null and void. If a fire starts because of improper installation, your insurance will not cover your claim either. The "30" designation does not refer to cabinet size, it refers to the ...


2

I had a microwave oven that would keep the fan, light, and turntable going until the food was rotated to its original orientation. That way it was easy to grab the handle of your tea cup :) I've repaired microwave ovens in the past, and I don't think that a few extra seconds of airflow (after the cooking is completed) would help the longevity. They are ...


2

I've found from repairing and "hacking" microwaves that they all follow a flow chart when a symptom prevents it from working normally. From what I can recall about the symptom "unit not heating" and if that is the only symptom, the primary parts that are suspect are (in order of most likely the problem): 1). the High Voltage Diode (HVD). It should show ...


2

Turns out replacing the fuse did the trick. So, YES, the fuse in the range hood can affect the microwave's plug only without affecting the light and fan. Kenmore brand hood.


2

From the clarification in the comments, you're lucky! First, double check that your floor joists are lined up well enough that you can get a 10" duct through the floor where you need it. If a floor joist (or a beam) is massively in the way, you'll need some custom ducting or cancel the job entirely. I'd cut a generous square at the bottom of the wall so ...


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