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14

Um...in a word...ABSOLUTELY NOT!! You should without a doubt get the proper replacement insulation and put it back same as it came from the factory.


12

Setting traps will kill what you have, but you still have the problem of the mice getting in. you need to figure out how they are getting into the house. Mice can get through incredibly tiny holes, so it might be a chore to find them all. But as you find holes, seal them up. Steel wool is useful for this as they don't like chewing through it.


8

Try searching "mouse bucket trap". There's a ton of different variations, so I'm not going to go into too much detail. But basically it's a bucket, a ramp, some peanut butter, and a rotating mechanism. If you want to kill the mice, put some antifreeze (or other poison) in the bucket. If you're looking for less lethal, leave the bucket empty, or put in some ...


5

If you look carefully the problem may be worse than you estimate.Remove drawers from kitchen cabinets and check inside for droppings.Check the lower shelves of cabinets and any where food is stored.Try to eliminate food sources,crumbs,pet food etc. should be cleaned up and stored in sealed containors.I would contact the property owner and the local health ...


4

I have personally moved to the "plastic cheese" traps and use them with no bait (other than the supposed, and probably fictional IMHO, "odor in the plastic." They have a large target area and a trigger of adjustable sensitivity - if it gets stepped on, it gets tripped. I reuse them without undue care (I do leave them out in the weather for a while if they ...


4

It's unlikely to be a major issue with reused traps. Just check that there's not a little rust or something developed that is causing them to stick. You could try a square of chocolate as the bait. If you heat the pin on the trigger platform, you can push the chocolate on and it's stuck there. That makes it harder for the mice to get away with the bait.


4

I personally go with 'forever'. I've got a good-size house, on a little bit land, and a garage door that I leave open for fair amounts of time each day in good weather. I'm ALWAYS going to have mice getting in, even though I've patched every hole I can find. It's just sort of inevitable at this point. So I keep the snap-traps under the sink and in the ...


4

Generally, house mice don't carry hantavirus. However, it sounds like your property may be semi-rural, so there might be deer mice, which may carry it. I found this Center for Disease Control PDF. Interestingly enough, it doesn't talk about respiratory protection at all. It seems that all you need to do is spray down the old nests/etc. with disinfectant ...


4

When sealing a hole around an electrical entry cable, the best product to use is Plasduct. It is a putty like material, gray in color. You will find it in most electrical departments at the box stores or your local hardware store. Use it just like modeling clay, work it a bit to make it pliable, then stuff it into the hole around the cable as deeply as ...


3

You've taken some good precautionary steps to eradicate the vermin from your house. But I'd like to suggest and comment on some of the tasks. The first job you should accomplish is to stop the rodent's point of entry. This can be done by walking the exterior perimeter of your house. Points of entry include: conduit penetrating the wall, air vents with holes ...


3

Expanding foam can get messy but it may be your best bet, if you can keep it in place and they do not chew through it. You may want to either incorporate a heavy gauge metal mesh wire, neatly cut around or into the place the mice go through. You might could even "bed" the wire mesh in the foam as it is expanding to lock in place that way. Doing this will ...


3

According to the CDC's website, keep putting out the mouse traps and after five straight days of no mice, you should be in the clear. I did that in our attic and it seemed to do the trick --- and yes, there is always more than one... we caught 5 in 5 days. Three traps were left with peanut butter and no catches. After 30 days, I put out two traps again ...


2

3 basic things to do: get rid of food access (put cereal in plastic tubs, grains in glass jars, etc.) block access (plug all holes in the structure...permanantly, if you can...otherwise use stainless steel wool) trap existing mice (I'm a fan of the glue traps...though they may not be the most humane, they do work) Unfortunately, in a shared structure, #1 ...


2

Call an exterminator, or if you rent, insist your landlord call an exterminator. Personally, I feel a mouse infestation where they are in the main areas of your house crosses the line from "pest annoyance" to "serious health issue." There are of course many things you can do on your own to repel or even eliminate mice, but if you have a baby on the way, you ...


2

The presence of the droplets seems to indicate that there is still a water leak in the roof of the bumpout. The discoloration is likely coming from the accumulated dirt and dust in the "attic" part of the bumpout. It is also possible that the discoloration is coming from the leak water pooling in an area where the mice deposited their droppings and then ...


2

Smashing a raisin down, onto the trigger plate of regular, wooden, snap traps is a great way to get the mice to commit. They can't easily remove the bait without engaging the trap.


2

I had the same trouble with the classic snap traps: a blob of peanut butter would just get licked away. My solution was to add a tube of tape around the trigger and bait, so that it was tough to get all the peanut butter; that way the mouse would end up tugging and chewing, and snappo.


2

Copper "wool" or mesh is sold for the purpose of plugging such holes. The mice cannot chew it and it doesn't corrode, e.g., https://www.amazon.com/Stuf-Fit-Copper-Mesh-Birds-Control/dp/B0001IMLTY


2

I believe it comes down to smell, that of you and dead mouse. Sanitize them over the stove for a few seconds. Ecnerwal's 'weathering' technique probably works just as well or better. Mice have a very keen sense of smell. If they start to avoid traps, it could be because they sense a human smell around the trap. That is why it is always best to wear gloves ...


1

I live in an older home and I had a pretty significant mouse issue for a while. I could hear them in the ceilings at night. The first thing I tried was putting snap traps. These are somewhat effective but there are issues: One mouse at a time. If you have a lot of mice, you will need a lot of traps Don't forget to check the traps. The odor of weeks old ...


1

There is a "home brew" and a commercial form of "bucket-trap" which basically lures them out to a freely rotating element baited with peanut butter and drops them into water to drown. If you build it with a hole in the side and use a lid (as the commercial version I recall is built) it's fairly dog-safe as there's just the hole in the side (typically with a ...


1

Is there any mouse traps on the market which are battery operated and give signal when activated etc wifi, bluetooth? Yes. Kinda. Google is your friend for this kind of thing. A random result:


1

By gas pipe, you mean the gasline--not the actual chimney, right? If so, that is likely steel pipe. It COULD be copper, but you'd be able to tell if that's the case. If it's a steel pipe, stainless steel wool should be fine to plug it.


1

It looks like your siding is wood (probably cedar). You don't want to seal this too much - the underside of these shakes/shingles needs to be able to release moisture or your siding may rot sooner. Best option is to seal from the inside, probably with spray foam. Edit based on comments: because you've indicated this is an inaccessible crawlspace, you should ...


1

Critters can squeeze their bodies into any space their head will fit into. Humans, not so much. There are ways to fix and exit using flexible mesh that allows them to leave, but not return. I watched one of those exterminator tv shows years ago and saw their setup. It was ingenious. You may find an episode or explanation on YouTube. We had a turd of a ...


1

Poison (Warferin or similar, aka D-CON) Buy more traps. I bought a 10-pack, and had them lined up to get multi-catch. The bucket traps take up a lot of space, don't work in low-ceilinged areas, and require that you not disturb the ramp; even then the mouse often jumps while the soda can is turning.


1

Just FYI if you want to catch mice 100% or close to it then you need to lay out glue traps or very elaborate door traps. Anything else gives the mouse a chance.


1

I had a problem with mice licking peanutbutter out of trap without settling it off! Then a guy told me raw bacon because they Have to tug on it! Worked awesome got rid them in no time! It's been over 10 years and no problems!


1

We had a similar experience and it turned out that unfortunately we had mice and rats! A rat can trip a mouse trap and escape unharmed because they are significantly larger. You might try a couple of the large rat traps with peanut butter as well. You could also try placing the mouse traps in the center of a glue board. They would get stuck when trying to ...


1

Mouse and rat traps work better with time. Speaking to a pest control guy he indicated that the traps originally smell very foreign to mice and rats. Last time I had to trap rats I put baited but unset traps out so the traps would pick up the body oils of the rodents. The next day, after the bait was gone, I put bait on (stale bread covered in peanut butter, ...


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