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12

I just save my broken blades for this. Clamp it in a vise, where you want it to break off and hit it with a hammer very sharply. It should snap off (make sure the part you want to KEEP is in the vise). If you have to work it back and forth a little, you can clean up the edges on a grinder.


9

Steel EMT will rust over time in a buried environment with moisture where PVC will last virtually forever unless it's exposed to sunlight. I'd go with PVC which is also likely to be less expensive.


7

Use pliers or vise grips to grab the blade on each side of the line you marked for the cut and just wiggle back and forth. Metal fatigue will cause the blade to break. This works better on stiff brittle metal better than soft flexible metal. This is a hack thou, and if you are doing this often enough, there is a much better way which is a dedicated drywall ...


4

Given that this wall separates two apartments in recent construction, the wall you're drilling is likely not to be "normal" familiar construction. It's probably some kind of "area separation wall" designed firstly to limit the spread of fire and secondly to limit the spread of noise between apartments. You might do well to seek information from building ...


3

There are no set rules across materials, all the materials have different wall thickness (thus outside diameters) based on their use (strength and durability) and other reasons. The best you can do is pick your material and look at the size charts to find something that works for your needs


3

The composition of the metal in a recip blade may be a composite, hardened steel for the teeth, softer stuff for the backbone, or it could be lower grade throughout. The hardened stuff is pretty brittle, and the "softer" metal of the backbone gives it strength. If you have a dremel tool (rotary hobbyist type) or a side grinder, you can score the blade at ...


3

EMT has the merit of being protected from physical damage, but it will rust and requires special boxes and kit to prevent that. PVC Sched 80 is also protected from physical damage, and, you can use Sched 80 and Sched 40 interchangeably (since the critical dimension, the OD of the pipe, is the same). PVC conduit will degrade in the sun. It's sun ...


3

Prep is the key You can make it look good for 3 months with a rattle can. If you want it to look good for 10 years, paint prep is called for. Prep has 2 components: de-gloss(microscopically roughen) the surface so paint can bind to it, and cleaning the surface to remove contaminants. A 3M Scotchbrite pad, green pots and pans style, for scuffing the ...


3

A common bolt cutter would do well, assuming solid wire and not stranded: A more dedicated cable shears would be easier and make cleaner cuts, but it's likely much more expensive:


3

Before I start - this is a simple task but it's not as simple as it might seem at first glance. I would mount this with flat head machine screws. I would take that lock to the hardware store and see what size fits right in the countersinks (the tapered part). It might be say a size 8 machine screw. Most of are threaded with so that there are 32 threads ...


3

You may notice that the wheel is described as being suitable for carts, hand trucks, etc. and is not designed as a drive wheel. If your loads are not excessive, you may get away with powering the wheel. One method is to cut a slot in the flange of the wheel at the axle. Your drive axle would then have to be powered by the motor and the portion of the axle ...


3

No contest Sandblaster doesn't just beat, it positively trounces any other rust removal method. That's not me talking. It's NASA. Their location at Cape Canaveral ("Who picked this place? Nikita Khrushchev?") ... has a huge problem with rust due to being tidal and subject to sea spray. What a lovely place for millions of tons of steel latticework ...


3

Yeah, newbies + metal drilling is usually a recipe for disaster. Usually I'm a fan of having newbies use hand tools for a good while until they get the tactile feel of the tool and the material. That's hard to do in drills, though, as proper, usable hand drills are practically unobtanium these days. So I'd prefer newbs start with a drill press where ...


3

It sounds like what you are describing here (and in the other thread) is called the "seat" for the valve stem washer, and usually that seat is replaceable for this exact reason. If it is replaceable, the inside will have a geometric shape, usually hexagonal, sometimes square (or the corners of a square cut into the sides of a round opening, see below), to ...


3

There are structural fittings for use with steel tubing. The tubing is all the same size, the difference with EMT (Electrical Metal Tubing) is that the insides are ground and finished so as to not cause damage to the wire insulation. Strctural tubing is not, and there are places that sell fittings for structural tubing.


2

It will sag. This is known as "deflection", and is known for various materials and cross-sections, including your steel pipes. https://www.engineering.com/calculators/beams.htm Scroll down to "Hollow rectangular beams" and enter your numbers. Unfortunately, this calculator is in inches, but it's easy enough to convert. Your 300kg mass would cause a ...


2

Living in South Florida I know exactly what you mean about the metal studs. What has worked for me is starting out with a very small drill bit and moving up to the size you finally need. The best screws to me are drywall screws if you can stand the black appearance and the head sticking out a bit. You can usually start them out with a whack of a hammer and ...


2

There is this one on Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B071W4VQPT You are working with a 20x20 tile and these are 2.25" Roughly These ones: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0195UGD38 They are much larger, though WAY more Expensive. Though you will see those Brackets. You could use something like this on the Inside with some Galv Bolts or SS Screws to make ...


2

I would just buy some 2"x 3" or 3"x3" aluminum angle and cut off 2" pieces and drill holes in each side. You could get a lot of brackets from a long piece of angle and epoxy them to the tiles. Aluminum is soft enough to cut with hacksaw . You could use a diamond drill bit to drill the tiles and dill holes in the angle to attach the brackets with machine ...


2

Buy a piece of exhaust pipe in same diameter. Preferably 12 inches long.. Split the pipe lengthwise. Slip it over broken pole ends, Clamp it in place with exhaust clamps and put a band clamp over the break area. Make sure the pole is level vertically before tightening all clamps. About $ 45 in parts.


2

The Proxxon doesn't look like it can cut threads so that won't help you in that area. As far as the other items you want to make it looks good. With practice you would probably get good results. I learned how to use a lathe in high school shop class and it's not hard. Some of the other much more expensive lathes can cut threads but with optional equipment.


2

In general to transfer torque through an axle to a larger round thing there are three main ways: Light loads. (fractional horsepower) A flat space is ground on the axle. A set screw in the hub of the round thing (usually a pulley) keeps the round thing from spinning. I've run into this a lot on trailer furnace blowers. Medium loads: (1 to small number ...


2

No, you do not need to screw into solid lumber (joists, stripping,etc.). You’ll want to follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions, but here is a major metal roofing manufacturer’ installation chart for screws into plywood, OSB board, and 2 x lumber for wind uplift, which is on page 14: http://pdf.lowes.com/installationguides/716702706866_install....


2

Aluminum EMT is available. Check with your local electrical supplier. If you feel that the higher cost is worth it, you'll know that it won't rust and is unaffected by sunlight.


2

If it's not important for the shank of the bolt to remain perfectly round then a belt sander with a coarse grit will do fine. The 80 grit is the most fine I'd try; 60 would be better. Grits as coarse as 36 or even 24 are routinely used for fast material removal by an angle grinder when working with steel. You could get a belt that coarse but it will leave a ...


2

Cables, Pulleys, and Counterweights would probably be the easiest and most effective way to DIY a shelf to be raised into/lowered from a skylight without extensive fabrication abilities.


2

It's cast aluminum. Most dishwasher detergents contain lye (NaOH, sodium hydroxide) - which reacts drastically with aluminum. Fortunately the dwell time in a dishwasher is short enough that it generally only darkens, as opposed to dissolving entirely (which it will do with adequate time.) Yes, it's safe to use (after hand-washing and rinsing throughly), ...


2

Well, first off, because the hammer is utterly the wrong shape, it won't work very well - and you can substitute "at all" for "very well" without being very off the mark, especially since you are evidently new to this and don't understand it much at all. Peening a scythe properly is a process that takes some tools and some skill. With certain tools, more ...


2

If Cost was a factor vs type of base metal being thin like an automobile then i would suggest sand blast. If it was 2" thick and cost was a consideration then grind. thick metal would take the grind a bit more. for sand blasting a piece you could of grinded for less then it would be worth considering. setting up for sand blasting vs. borrowing a grinder ...


2

Copper is "red", adding zinc to it makes it brass and the more zinc the more yellow/gold. However , there is always an exception. Yellow brass is usually 70 Cu; 30 Zn, but a cheaper yellow brass is ( muntz metal ) 60 Cu ;40 Zn and is a little reddish compared to 70;30. For these two alloys the color trend reverses. So it looks like the knobs are 70;30 and ...


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