Hot answers tagged

26

Looks like a run-of-the-mill landscape stake to me. They're used for securing plastic edging, fabric, etc. Could also be a tent peg. It's a horse apiece. I'd give it a few taps with a hammer to loosen it, then try prying it out with a spade or the hammer with a block under it.


26

With a sharp drill, oil and patience, or with carbide. But Why make a hole?


15

A challenge at home. Good tools are hardened to near Rockwell C hardness 40. Cheap tools can be much softer. A professional machine shop can drill up to HRC 40 , so they could slowly do it. You have a chance with a new HSS bit , high sulfur cutting oil ( you will probably need to find some old oil as likely it is now illegal) , low RPM , pressure . If the ...


14

Most municipalities and counties maintain a central resource of buried utility line locations. Here in New England it's telephone 888-DIG-SAFE. In most of the U.S. you can start with telephone 811. They probably do not know exactly where the lines run onto your property, but they will tell you what to look for, and if that stake is one of theirs.


13

Without cutting fluid chances are you melted the cutting edges of your bit. Use a sharp bit and any oil you have lying around, along with a slow speed.


12

I would say no don’t use a crowbar unless you are good at repairing/ replacing brick work. I would grind the head off that or burn it off with a oxy-acetylene torch. I have put anchors up and use a torch to make it look like a rivet. In doing this it makes the bolt impossible to pull without cutting the head off. Expanding anchors are usually used so pulling ...


11

You discovered wrong. Ethernet runs at 100MHz and up, your line voltage at 60Hz is virtually DC at that frequently difference. With that said, you should still run your data cables in conduit. Not for interference concerns, but so that in 2040 you can easily replace the cat5 with something new for our 20K ultra VR direct brain video or whatever is the deal ...


9

Anneal The Butt of the Wrench First When you view this question in the general since of "how to I drill steel that is too hard to drill with the tools I have", annealing it first is one possible solution. Depending on how steel is cooled, it can form different kinds of crystalline structures that give it its unique properties. In the case of the ...


8

Your drill should definitely handle a 2 mm drill bit. Make sure it's a drill made for metal. Use a nail and hammer to countersink the hole. Then follow with the drill. I have always used a drop or two of oil, (3 in One works great), when drilling as it will cool and lubricate the surface as well as prolonging the life of your drill bit.


8

Assuming that the bent part is actually a square hollow tube and that the foot is open: Lay the cupboard on the ground with the bent leg horizontal and on top - i.e., if we're looking at the right side front leg, lay the cupboard either on the back or the left side. Get a metal bar slightly smaller than the inside of the leg. A piece of rebar might fit. You ...


8

Nice cabinet by the way. I'm guessing it's a ferrous metal and if you hold a magnet to it the magnet is attracted to the metal. If so get your self a Mapp gas tank and a swirl-type torch. Heat the bent metal until it turns a dull red. Move the torch across the buckled area keeping the metal hot. Now with a smooth-face hammer (any style, 20-24 oz is best) ...


8

Speaking as somebody who's spent much more time messing around with networks and power cables than with bricks and beams: keep them moderately separated but don't go full paranoid. Power cables are substantially more robust than network cables, have different failure modes, and are tested differently by people with different skills and equipment. Network ...


7

Yeah, they have these little discs that come in tubes of like 30. They're cheap. Those, plus patience, work fantastically for me. You have to be very, very sensitive to excessive pressure or any side-load, misalignment with the cut slot, ripples, vibration effects or anything irregular. Disengage immediately when you start to see that. If you persist, the ...


6

I think you've probably got three things going on here: Dull bit to start with. You need a sharp bit to drill steel by hand. Inappropriate bit that dulls faster in steel. Often times, the drill bits that you'll buy in sets at the hardware store have a 118 degree angle on the tip rather than the 135 degree angle that is better for drilling in steel. RPM ...


6

If this is what you bars are held in place with, these can be removed with a nail puller photo courtesy Amazon/Estwing The larger mushroom part of the pin assembly is soft lead, the pin in the center is a much harder metal. Drive the angled end of the nail puller forks around the center pin by digging into the lead "head", it will yield, and allow ...


6

They are iron ( unlikely steel at that age ) identified by the density match to iron. The reddish color that looks like granite is rust on a pitted surface. Pig iron ( high carbon and silicon ) or wrought iron ( more or less pure iron ). An unusual shape for either as far as I know. My guess is that they are raw material intended to be made into something. A ...


6

If you have the chops and some electrical equipment, you can use EDM to put a small hole in the wrench with a relatively quick pace. There is a popular YouTube video with a simple methodology here While the application is very niche, I figured that I would post it because it is by far the fastest method to remove material at home, and you don't have to (...


5

You need to use self-tapping sheet metal screws. You should be able to find these at any home center or hardware store. The metal garage door is a thin sheet of metal, usually aluminum or steel with a foam core and another thin sheet on the other side. If it's uninsulated, then there is usually only the outside sheet but there should be a "U" at ...


5

Just about any 2 part epoxy would meet your requirements. However, gluing both sides is asking for trouble in the future. Couple of ways around this. You could use loctite blue (thanks @jwh20 for steering us away from red) on the grub screws, which would be reversible but more secure than your current setup. You could lightly dimple the axle with a drill bit ...


5

Magnets Get a pack of magnets. Each one can hold a wrench to the side of a toolbox, refrigerator or other steel surface.


5

Have you considered wrapping them with paracord?


5

Reality check: Drilling does not make heat. NOT drilling makes heat! :) if the drill isn't cutting effectively, it's sitting there getting hot (and work hardening the metal and dulling the drill). Once I was drilling holes in mild steel on a mill, working fast - drill, index, drill, index, drill. I was making nice long chips that came off like noodles. ...


4

There is good information given on how to bend steel tubing. The door won't close because the door frame is bent, not just the leg. Here's a drawing to illustrate the issue. It is one thing to get the leg straight - it's another thing to get the door to fit in the frame. You'll need to straighten both the frame and the leg. Using a square do an analysis of ...


4

It's not the problem it's made out to be. Ethernet is running at millions of frames per second. Power is 60 frames per second. Imagine we stretch that time frame out by a factor of 86400*60. Now, the AC frequency is akin to the rising and setting of the sun, and the Ethernet is akin to ships passing light-gun signals. Does the sun interfere with that? Of ...


4

Likely needs to be brazed and repainted if you want to do it right. If you just want quick and dirty, try using a grounding clamp. mcmaster.com/grounding-clamps/grounding-screws/


4

Another option I've gone with is to weld a loop onto the tool. That said, for extremely hard metals you can work your way through pretty much anything with a diamond bit and patience if specialized drill bits and cutting oil don't work. If you can stand a 1/4" hole a diamond hole saw will probably do the trick. There are also ball head type diamond ...


4

What you want to use are cutting wheels or grinding disks similar to the ones shown below. They have always worked great for me. They wear down faster than the heavier ones but they're thinner so they cut faster. They do break a little easier than the heavier one too.


3

Mine was even further bent and I got it straight using just a wooden block. I slipped it behind the elbow bend,and pulled with hands on either end of the block towards the center position. With some force it straightened (mostly) out. I also took out a hammer to hammer the block, but it wasn’t needed. It’s not 100% perfectly straight but I only notice it ...


3

Your first consideration has to be evaluating the value of the lamp. There are various factors that would need to enter into the decision equation as to whether to repair or replace: Sentimental attachment Part of a set of lamps Cost of repair Replacement cost If you land on the side of repair then I can see a number of possible options. Take the whole ...


3

Per the accepted answer above, here is a picture of the old and new harps with their respective bases. I originally saw the old harp as "welded to the lamp" but in fact it was welded to its own base that was attached to the lamp in the usual way, and it was easily replaced as shown here. I was excited to develop my non-existent brazing skills as ...


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