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I work for a metal roofing company, and this is a big area of concern for a lot of homeowners. Here's what I can say: based on experience and facts. 8-10 years ago, the fasteners on exposed metal roofing were terrible. They failed CONSISTENTLY. There were very few competing fastener companies and rubber washers cracked and leaked like crazy. And when your ...


4

Being at the wrong end of multiple countries divided by a common language, in the USA I'd be looking for a company listed under "roofing" or "roofers" and preferably one that specifically mentioned metal roofing as something they do. The same people that install them in the first place generally know how to fix them as well. As a self-described non-handy ...


4

I live in a log home with metal gable roofs. They're made of metal panels, overlapped and screwed though with gaskets etc., but no insulation beneath them (there's an attic). The metal roof does indeed add noticeable noise in a rainstorm, but we find it actually soothing. It's sort of a soft drumming noise, except in the worst storms. More surprisingly, ...


3

The problem is that if there is an issue with the product at some point in the future, the manufacturer will deny any warranty claim because the installation instructions were not followed. If this were mine, I'd insist that the installer follow the instructions for the products regardless of what everyone else does.


2

It depends on the product. Some are rated down to that low a slope, and some aren't. I've seen 3:12 specified as the minimum for many, but there are some that allow 2:12. Make sure you choose one of those. As for installation, just follow the instructions. Don't try to get creative. The people who design these products are very explicit about how they are ...


2

If this roof in question is standing seam, then there shouldn't be any leaks because the fasteners are all concealed. Are you sure it isn't an exposed fastener roof? That's typically the type of roof that leaks when fasteners work their way out over time. For exposed fastener roofs, they make gasketed "rescue screws" specifically designed to be fastened ...


2

I would think that if the nails are the leak source then yes replace them with rubber gasket-ed screws, but put some quad sealant in each hole before driving the screw in.


2

Roofers need to be certified by the metal roofing manufacturer before they are allowed to install that manufacturer’s roofing. They also need to STAY certified, which requires taking classes (continuing education) for the latest trends, etc. I like metal roofs because, 1) lightweight, 2) fire resistive, 3) certified installation approval by manufacturer, 4)...


2

Metal roofs are not fragile, that's complete baloney. The gold standard for long lasting roofing are standing seam copper, slate or quality tile. Standing seam steel won't last quite as many decades, but it's good. All of these have high up front cost, but will save money over the long term. Composition roofs must be thrown in a landfill every few decades....


2

It depends on the quality of installation, but on average exposed fastener metal roofs (which do, indeed, use EDPM washers if not of very low quality and life-expectancy) are a 15-25 year roof, while a quality standing seam job is a 50 year roof. The EDPM washer is not a band-aid - it's a part of this roofing system design (and most of the fasteners are ...


1

It depends. There’s several issues: 1) deck thickness, 2) metal panel width, 3) wind loading, 4) slope of roof You’ll want to follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions, but here are generally acceptable standards. 1) Most manufacturers recommend penetrating the roof deck, unless it’s 2x material (1 1/2” thick). Therefore, 1/2” plywood deck could ...


1

You need to always follow the metal roofing manufacturer’s recommendations for installation, but generally you can use 1-layer of 15# building paper if the slope is 4:12 or greater and it’s standing seam metal roof with concealed fasteners. You need a minimum of 2-layers 15# building paper if it’s a slope between 2:12 and 4:12. Below 2:12 slope you need ...


1

Your concern with exposed-fastener metal roofs is justified. But neoprene washers aren't a band-aid. They form a part of the design of metal roofs. If you want to go for exposed-fastener metal roofs be sure you get them of good quality and their installation is done correctly. Another solution is you can opt for a fastener with a non-metallic head fully ...


1

(Too long for a comment) How many layers of shingles or type of shingles are on the current roof? Your mom paid someone; was that person licensed? This needs to be addressed. I don't like it when anyone gets ripped off but get especially upset when it is an elderly person. Limited info provided on the existing roof: Is there is only 1 or 2 layers of 3 ...


1

First, stop the leaking. Use tarps or whatever. Next, I’d try to dry the roof structure out before installing the metal roofing. (Yes, the roof structure should be dry before installing the roofing.) I’d also check for mold, (as you say the roof has been leaking for 3 years). It may not be safe to stay in the house and continue breathing that air.


1

You need an engineer to know definitively what your requirements are for your location and design. I am assuming you did not consult an engineer since they would have the spacing specified in the plans. ( it is unlikely they would they have specified 4 feet deep ) We can not answer your question because we do not know the required info nor would it be wise ...


1

The best way to remedy this is to remove the portion of metal over the transition to cement roof, add a transition flashing that goes over the cement roof. It should cover at least the first row of exposed cement tile at the top and the metal is folded so it turns up the higher pitch, but goes under the metal roof at least as high as a few inches above the ...


1

Short answer: go to the hardware store, buy whatever, paint it down and watch it fail in a few years. What you do at that point depends on what you used. Or you could consider over-roofing it with EPDM rubber, using the rubber-cement-like glue to stick it down (paint both surfaces and join them). The easy made-for-wood glue won't work. Careful pricing ...


1

First: yes you need to remove all the rust before repainting, or the paint will just flake off as the rust continues. Next: you need to make sure that there's some "body" left after initial sanding/scraping of rust, or you might as well replace the sheets. You also need to verify that all rust is on the top, i.e. there's no leaking and bottom-side rust (...


1

Take the deck up, patch holes with pop rivets & paint on a Seal-o-flex type of roof coating...the best long term solution short of a new roof. But, All from the underside: Any caulk or drill out visible holes to accept larger rubber plugs. Or, use Bondo (Auto body filler) or JB Weld (muffler & exhaust pipe repair) from the Auto Parts store. None ...


1

Wait, you have a DECK over metal roof that is NAILED down? You pretty much won't be able to stop leaks :/ but you can try... 1) take out all nails and use Rubber Washer screws. 2) seal each skrew and all overlaps with SOLAR SEAL 900 - you can find it online. Best thing is to use a real waterproofing material for flat roof decks - http://www....


1

Carefully pull the suspect nails (or all the nails) with a small pry bar or "cat's paw" and replace with new corrugated roofing nails like these: Or, if appearance is not important, smear a big glob of roof patch over the existing nails' heads.


1

The best and easiest solution is unfortunately no longer possible without removing and reinstalling the metal roofing: you vent above the sheathing and below the metal roof. The way you would do this is by installing the metal roof on vertical eave-to-ridge battens, with a metal ridge vent piece at the ridge. This way, all the ventilation is on the outside ...


1

You can install insulating foam panels directly to the existing roof membrane (decking). The panels are backed with OSB wood panels (the OSB would face out/up). So basically it would be roof decking, then foam insulation, than bonded OSB wood decking. Over it all you would place roofing felt and roofing material. Check out this short video.


1

I think it depends on where you live. I live where we get a ton of rain and it blows sideways. When the metal roofing expands and contracts, it causes the head of the screw to move, thus the neoprene washer moves. It often gets “tweaked” from the movement causing one side of the washer to curl up. This allows wind blown rain to penetrate the roofing system....


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