18

I would caution against using any bolt cutters on the toilet hold down bolts. The reason being that they typically will apply a significant pressure against the porcelain base of the stool and crack or break it. Another thing to consider is that bolt cutters typically have a jaw profile as shown below. With this type of arrangement it is just not possible ...


17

Bolt cutters are not really the best tool for cutting off rusted closet bolts. I usually use a "mini-hack" saw:


11

After cutting the bolt to length, use a stationary grinder instead of a file to clean up your work. With a grinder, it's easy to square up the end of the bolt and apply the chamfer that you want. Just be careful, especially if the bolt is shorter than the grinder's table. If the bolt is short, use a pair of vice grips to hold the bolt during grinding. And ...


9

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


9

There are several online metal suppliers that will also make custom cuts. Online Metals is one that I have used. There is a minimum length that you must order (usually 1 ft) and a charge per cut. Depending on where you live you might also find a local metal supplier that can do the same for you. Wherever you order, I'd suggest you get two 5" pieces ...


9

For a hole of that size or larger a hole saw might be an easier method as it removes less material and may be more likely to stay centered due to its pilot bit. However using the more standard bit you have is working and you should be able to get all the way through. The type of vibration and unevenness of the hole from that type of bit is not uncommon in ...


8

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


7

A hacksaw would definitely get the job done. If you're looking for a power-tool version, a Reciprocating saw is the (fun) way to go. Probably not a good thing to use a jig saw on as usually they are intended for making more precise cuts, hence are slower.


7

Right snips are the most often used and it is possible to use only them, but if you want a neat and professional finish I would advise getting both right- and left-cutting, considering they are not that expensive for a decent set. If you are a beginner with corrugated it may be worth getting offset snips if you're planning on cutting the length of sheets. ...


6

I used to use a 7 1/4" metal cutting wheel on a circular saw. Works good, but wheel wears down fairly fast. There are also some good shear attachments that mount on drills. I'd advise you to make the cuts on the end going to the top, not the exposed bottom. Definitely have some spray paint or primer to treat the cut end, because it will rust. If you put ...


5

There's a couple of different tools you can use: The best tool / way 1 - Electric shears and / or nibblers. These are in my opinion, the best tools you can buy. Shears work fine while nibblers are designed more specifically for corrugated or curved panels. If you're a professional, this is what you need to buy. Fein Nibbler link at Amazon Trumpf Tools ...


5

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


5

If you buy the pipe at Home Depot, they custom cut it (and thread it) for free. You have to buy the pipe, and there is a fairly flexible policy that they will make up to three cuts per 10 foot length, but if you catch them an hour before closing or when it is not otherwise busy, they are very accommodating.


5

To drill through metal, use a "slow speed and heavy feed". That is, make the drill bit rotate (relatively) slowly, but push hard. Also note that drill bits are directional -- they either cut when rotating clockwise or counterclockwise. You can tell which edge is the cutting edge by gently running your finger along the drill bit's edges. Make sure your drill ...


5

I'd like to elaborate the step drill bit suggestion by @riseagainst IMO the best option by far for drilling medium sized holes in metal with handheld electric drills. Specifically I would recommend a single flute step drill such as this one: The problem with drilling holes in metal with a handheld drill is correctly categorized as a 'speeds and feeds' ...


4

If you're trying to cut in place, I'd personally go with drilling an initial hole, and then cutting the shape of the vent with a "sheet metal nibbler". The nibbler will let you cut from one side, as there's a small bit that you insert into the hole, and sheers off a small roll of material (somewhere near 1/8", depending on the exact pair). You can also get ...


4

You have numerous options: Drill out the screws with a drill bit larger than the screw diameter. Use a hand hack saw to cut it into manageable pieces. Use a reciprocating saw - a "Sawzall" to cut it into manageable pieces. Beat it into submission with a sledge hammer until it folds and bends and breaks (get medieval on it!) My recommendation would be the ...


4

The bases of the stand look as if the pole is welded to it. Unless you have welding skills, cutting at the base probably will not work. The top appears to consist of a thinner pole that the speaker is attached to, inserted into a slightly larger pole that is attached to the base. In addition, there is a locking knob that seems to go through a threaded hole ...


4

NOt as High Tech as Bib's answer but its still popular and only requires a bit of elbow grease. A hand held hacksaw with a blade designed for steel. TIPS The blades sharp edges need to curve/point towards yourself (called a pull-cut orientation). So it will cut when you pull back. Otherwise you will have a really hard time doing this. Apparently a push-...


4

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


4

Straight from the horses mouth:


4

Since it appears to be in dirt, dig it out would appear to be an option. If there's actually concrete under the dirt, chisel it out is still an option. I'm unclear as to how that's not accessible to a hacksaw - looks plenty accessible to me. Other than a hacksaw, a sawzall (reciprocating saw) or angle grinder with cutoff disk are typical powertool ...


4

Try one of those oscillating multi-tools. They can cut metal (with the right blade), and cut flush to the surface, even in a corner.


4

That is either a painted or plated 1/2" copper line. If it is plated, the plating is failing or failed. Either way take a strip of emery cloth and clean it up before adding the compression fitting


4

When drilling into metal always use a cutting oil, at the minimum use an oil to reduce the friction and heat build up. I know that sounds counter intuitive reduce the friction, however you are not burning through the metal you are in effect cutting through the metal. Since the bit is to be cutting through the metal ; lubricating the bit is what allows it to ...


4

Welcome to DIY Home Improvement! 1/8" thick really isn't that bad. You could use a: Hack saw (cheapest method) Reciprocating saw Band saw


4

Powder-actuated gun nails are extremely hard. You don't want to have to cut them with a saw, and you probably won't have room anyway. Get yourself an angle grinder with an abrasive wheel. Bracing your hands well against the box, carefully grind away just the heads of the nails. You should then be able to pull the box off the nail shafts. Obviously, take ...


4

As you have implied, heating the metal is actually changing it near the cut and causing it to discolor. There's not soot or anything you can clean off - the metal is changed. You may be able to sand off the surface of the metal near the cuts to remove the discolored metal on the surface, but this will lead to a cut that doesn't look very clean and some ...


3

The saw works good but you will also need long sleeves and safety glasses. I speak from experience. nearly lost my sight in both eyed from infection from metal fragments when cutting steel roofing.


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