22

What you're describing is just inexperienced workmanship. You did a guillotine cut, like you would saw through a piece of wood. A better plan would be to use masking tape wrapped around it to designate the cut point, then cut through each face individually.


22

Using an angle grinder you're going to end up with melted PVC clogging the blade, and possible fire from hot metal/sparks that you are grinding igniting the plastic, etc. As such, the suggestion to use a reciprocating saw (effectively a form of power hacksaw) is valid - however, since you already own a hacksaw, and it does not seem like it should be such a ...


18

I would caution against using any bolt cutters on the toilet hold down bolts. The reason being that they typically will apply a significant pressure against the porcelain base of the stool and crack or break it. Another thing to consider is that bolt cutters typically have a jaw profile as shown below. With this type of arrangement it is just not possible ...


17

Bolt cutters are not really the best tool for cutting off rusted closet bolts. I usually use a "mini-hack" saw:


12

I just save my broken blades for this. Clamp it in a vise, where you want it to break off and hit it with a hammer very sharply. It should snap off (make sure the part you want to KEEP is in the vise). If you have to work it back and forth a little, you can clean up the edges on a grinder.


12

I think you'd do better with a Sawzall. That's the trade name - like Kleenex, everyone uses the name no matter what the brand. Just looked up - it is generically a reciprocating saw. These things can be dangerous beasts, but I think they'd be a lot safer for this type of job than an angle grinder. Buy/beg/borrow/rent - for one small job, any of the options ...


10

If you'll indulge me a second, I do have a different take I am trying to build a simple bench using wood and steel for the frame. If you're working with wood, you can buy metal cutting discs for miter and circular saws (example). These might be tools you already own and they might get you the square cut you need without having to fiddle with the manual ...


9

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


9

For a hole of that size or larger a hole saw might be an easier method as it removes less material and may be more likely to stay centered due to its pilot bit. However using the more standard bit you have is working and you should be able to get all the way through. The type of vibration and unevenness of the hole from that type of bit is not uncommon in ...


9

If this is something you will do often, you can get an angle grinder holder that will allow it to function like a miniature chop saw. You can make your own, or you can buy a pre-made one, but they all have the basic idea of holding the grinder steady along the plane of the cut and allow it to pivot up and down to make the cut. This will limit you to ...


9

Yes, it'll be fine but heed the valid warnings given in the other answers about the minor risk of melting plastic and starting small fires. You won't instantly be sitting in the middle of a blazing inferno; it'd me more like having a few birthday candles in front of you, but the fumes are unpleasant.. The biggest risk from an angle grinder in this context is ...


8

I used to use a 7 1/4" metal cutting wheel on a circular saw. Works good, but wheel wears down fairly fast. There are also some good shear attachments that mount on drills. I'd advise you to make the cuts on the end going to the top, not the exposed bottom. Definitely have some spray paint or primer to treat the cut end, because it will rust. If you put ...


8

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


7

A hacksaw would definitely get the job done. If you're looking for a power-tool version, a Reciprocating saw is the (fun) way to go. Probably not a good thing to use a jig saw on as usually they are intended for making more precise cuts, hence are slower.


7

Use pliers or vise grips to grab the blade on each side of the line you marked for the cut and just wiggle back and forth. Metal fatigue will cause the blade to break. This works better on stiff brittle metal better than soft flexible metal. This is a hack thou, and if you are doing this often enough, there is a much better way which is a dedicated drywall ...


7

As the goal is just to make it smaller: I'd use a sledge hammer to fold it up until it fits in the car, or if there's room just store it (even outdoors) until the next council hard waste collection.


6

There's a couple of different tools you can use: The best tool / way 1 - Electric shears and / or nibblers. These are in my opinion, the best tools you can buy. Shears work fine while nibblers are designed more specifically for corrugated or curved panels. If you're a professional, this is what you need to buy. Fein Nibbler link at Amazon Trumpf Tools ...


6

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


6

What I usually do when I'm cutting pipe depends on how square it actually needs to be. If it's going to be bearing against a surface, or if I'm threading the end of it, flatness is very important. If I can, I usually design things so that the ends of pipe don't need to be perfectly square, because that reduces work for everyone -- but sometimes it can't be ...


5

If you buy the pipe at Home Depot, they custom cut it (and thread it) for free. You have to buy the pipe, and there is a fairly flexible policy that they will make up to three cuts per 10 foot length, but if you catch them an hour before closing or when it is not otherwise busy, they are very accommodating.


5

To drill through metal, use a "slow speed and heavy feed". That is, make the drill bit rotate (relatively) slowly, but push hard. Also note that drill bits are directional -- they either cut when rotating clockwise or counterclockwise. You can tell which edge is the cutting edge by gently running your finger along the drill bit's edges. Make sure your drill ...


5

I'd like to elaborate the step drill bit suggestion by @riseagainst IMO the best option by far for drilling medium sized holes in metal with handheld electric drills. Specifically I would recommend a single flute step drill such as this one: The problem with drilling holes in metal with a handheld drill is correctly categorized as a 'speeds and feeds' ...


5

FWIW, I had a similar problem with some steel re-enforced concrete. I used a stone blade to cut away a load of the concrete, exposing a reasonably large amount of the steel, then switched to a metal blade to cut the steel. I did try a (new) hacksaw, but found it tedious, and seemed to dull the blade very quickly whilst doing relatively little to the steel. ...


5

A circular saw with a common carbide-tipped blade will make quick work of it. The steel in such frames is soft and will dull your blade only slightly, if at all. Otherwise, just knock it apart at the corners and slide it into the car. I carry 8' lumber in my little sedan all the time. Use eye and ear protection.


4

Straight from the horses mouth:


4

NOt as High Tech as Bib's answer but its still popular and only requires a bit of elbow grease. A hand held hacksaw with a blade designed for steel. TIPS The blades sharp edges need to curve/point towards yourself (called a pull-cut orientation). So it will cut when you pull back. Otherwise you will have a really hard time doing this. Apparently a push-...


4

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


4

The bases of the stand look as if the pole is welded to it. Unless you have welding skills, cutting at the base probably will not work. The top appears to consist of a thinner pole that the speaker is attached to, inserted into a slightly larger pole that is attached to the base. In addition, there is a locking knob that seems to go through a threaded hole ...


4

Grinder is best tool for this job....maybe even you can use the one that you have just make sure you have several plates in order to complete the job. If your grinder isn't enough 115mm one is big enough for sure....When you cut it don't just go straight down like you are cutting a butter but once you cut through wall on one side rotate your beam (or column, ...


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