17

There are special forms of Vernier caliper such as these known as neck calipers. These neck calipers enable measurements in hard to reach places. They offer you the following benefits: You can measure wall thickness inside bores and recesses. Obviously, the machinists calipers in A.I.Breveleri's answer will be cheaper and will probably work ...


12

The instrument you are thinking of is the Machinist Caliper. To use it on a lipped or framed plate where you cannot remove the caliper without opening it, you must insert a plate of known thickness into the measurement. The caliper has no readable scale -- you use it to transfer measurements to a ruler.


8

If they'll accept a full-size model, use the technique for making a template for cutting vinyl flooring to the right size and shape (taken from another answer of mine): ... I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. ...


8

The two things (starting in the middle and avoiding slivers) are NOT related. You can start in the middle and end up with idiotic cuts on both edges - or you can start in the corner and not do that... What you SHOULD do is measure enough that you know where to put the SENSIBLE cuts on the edges, regardless if you are starting at a wall, corner, or the ...


8

There are double-ended calipers which have the same gap at both ends, allowing you to measure the accessible end while set on the thing you are measuring. There are also calipers with a direct readout scale attached to the accessible end - in this case, using the different location from the pivot point to expand the scale for easier/more precise reading (...


6

What you need to know is the rough opening size. This is the dimensions between the vertical studs and the horizontal dimension from the floor to the bottom of the header. You may have to remove some trim to see these components. If you are going to have a contractor install the new door, have that person give you the proper measurements for the replacement ...


6

Yes, starting in the middle of the room can be a bit un-nerving. There's no reason not to begin in another location ; as long as you're comfortable with the appearance of cut tiles along the wall. For the sake of balance and uniformity It would be wise (as you noted) to begin at the most trafficked entry point working out and away into the room. I always ...


6

When you start a wall, your first board is not supposed to be on 16" centers. You're right, the first stud will end up 15.25" center to center from the second stud but that is because you don't want you first stud to be centered on the edge of the sheeting (whether your sheeting it with plywood, sheetrock, or whatever you're using). Rather, you want your ...


5

You could maybe use the phone App tool but you would still have to translate the angle reading into lines on the pieces of wood. A far better tool was invented long long ago that direct measures the angle and then allows for direct transfer to the wood. It is called a carpenters bevel or a bevel square.


4

Use a yard-stick. Walk up to the tree. Tie two ribbons around the tree, one at the base and the other as high as as possible. Measure the distance between the ribbons. Walk away from the tree. Face the tree. Hold the yard-stick plumb at arms length such that: the 0" mark is aligned at the base of the tree, and the 1" mark is aligned with the marker ...


4

The laser measuring devices are in that range. A 100' metal tape has temperature coefficient expansion issues. There are surveyors metal (and fiberglass) tapes on reels.


4

I've had mixed results with tape. Paint will wick/bleed under loosely bonded tape, especially if your surface is rough and well-bonded tape can damage the surface especially if you leave it on too long. A friend of mine likes Frog Tape, but I've never tried it. I just free-hand it and switch to decaf coffee for a day! I got good pretty quickly. and it's ...


4

Why not buy the pipe, and make the marks based on that. That is, have a level, hold the pipe up and level it, then mark where it touches the wall. A friend would help, so might hanging or otherwise supporting the pipe from either above or below as you do this.


4

I use low tech things for that kind of stuff. Bottle caps, jar lids, rolls of tape, 5 gallon buckets, whatever may fit the curve I am trying to measure. Once I find one that fits the curve, I measure the diameter and divide for the radius. There is a formula for finding diameter if you can set a straightedge or at least create a straight line between 2 ...


4

Micrometer would be what I can think of with a C shape, other than that, Spring joint calipers maybe?


4

If you do not need it that often, then you can just use any old vernier or other measuring tool you have around. Then grab two metal objects (possibly square) that are wide enough to go past the lip on both sides. Hold them to your mirror glass or whatever you are measuring, and measure the total width. Then, measure just the width of the two objects, and ...


4

+----------------------------+ | | | | | | | | +----------------------------+ [*]-------------------------[-]---------------------[*] <-- stake with nail ^-- stake with nail at ^-- stake at roughly set under extended ...


4

Storing the mag base "off" is equivalent to storing it "on" attached to a thick ferrous item - "off" is "magnetically attached to itself internally." Either is fine. This serves the same function as a "keeper" bar for a plain permanent magnet. A thin surface (sheet metal) is not as good, and "on" but not attached to anything risks weakening the magnet over ...


3

This is actually just a vacuum measurement system - used to show that there is negative pressure in the radon mitigation system drawing radon gas up and out of your home. As long as the liquid in the right hand arm is higher than the left, then it is working.


3

Use masking tape to isolate the area of the line to be painted. You don't say how wide the line needs to be. Here is a trick for making sure the two pieces are perfectly parallel. What you do is get two kinds of masking, one wide and one narrow. On a long flat surface you lay out your wide tape and secure it to the surface sticky side up with tape or tacks. ...


3

The sliding doors in our sunrooms and living rooms are all 80 inches in height 72 inches wide. Sliding doors are usually either 60 inch in width if they are 5 foot wide. If it’s 6 foot wide, it measures up to 72 inches. The height is usually 80 inches, though it may vary from one manufacturer to another. If you want to measure it, remove the wood trim first. ...


3

Use an open container of water, such as a bucket, the easy way. When standing, measure the height of your eyes, say 63". Fill a container with water, then measure the water depth, say 8". Subtract the two (55"). Walk away from the tree and find the spot where the reflection of the top of tree is in the center of the bucket when the bucket is on the ...


3

Getting R-value is based on three things really. Materials Distance Sealing Example - If you framed with 2x6s instead of 2x4s with just sheetrock - your wall would have more r-value because there would be a greater distance for air to travel to the other side. Also materials are given an r-value based on their use in a best case scenario. Just because ...


3

Use a long, small diameter drill bit from below and drill all the way through the beam and the roof. To prevent water intrusion, fill the hole with silicone caulk from above prior to making your attachment, then simply patch the beam from below with wood putty or spackle and paint/stain to match.


3

There are no standard sizes. Braces of the type you are considering most commonly have holes that are less than 1/4" and more than 1/8", somewhere around 3/16". They are usually intended for #6, #8 or #10 screws. You could probably use 1/8" bolts, or maybe 3/16" depending on the brace. 1/4" bolts probably won't fit unless you ream out the holes. Which ...


3

I hope you don't have many rooms which are 4'x4'!: That's worse than any college dorm room I ever saw. :-) The dimensions given for a room depend on the purpose of the measurement. For example, for real estate advertising purposes each room is usually simplified into rectangles to the nearest foot. Few would care that an "oval room" of 16' x 25' is ...


3

If you want to match that thickness exactly, you'll have to get something custom milled, or planed down from 1" stock. The difference between .83" and 0.75" is just over a 16th of an inch. Probably an extra layer of tar paper would make up the difference.


3

When I tiles three adjoining rooms I wanted straight lines connecting the rooms. I didn't want the dining room to be half a tile left or right of the kitchen. I started in the middle of the family room because it was the biggest and what would be the biggest area where any mistakes would be the most visible. Then, I laid out tiles from that center one, ...


3

I followed the advice given here and went with the "non-centered" approach - to ensure that the threshold looked good and not start in the middle of the room. Here are the results:


3

Pull from the end of the plate, find your stud center (red marks in your case), and back off 3/4". Mark that. Put an X at the red mark. Move to the next and repeat. To explain why, simply imagine that you're laying a 4x8' sheet of whatever on the wall. The edge of the sheet falls to the side of the first (end) stud... not at its center.


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