Hot answers tagged

6

Honestly, the best option for a bench that expects hard use is a sheet of 1/8" "tempered hardboard" - I don't know if that's one of those places where we are separated by a common language or not. Masonite® is the best known brand name, though they make multiple products so that may not be definitive. You put a trim board sticking up 1/8" ...


4

If your doorframes are MDF any patching is going to be visible to some degree. I would try filling it (with slight overfill) with wood putty and sanding it as smooth as you can using finer grit (220) for the finish. It all depends how particular you are - it's very difficult to get a perfect mend on this. The only other option is replacing that side of the ...


3

ANYTHING is better than MDF for your project as it is a terrible material for furniture, especially custom made furniture. Also you can't use a router on MDF - well you can but it will not turn out well. So you can probably find pine, oak and cedar at big box. All stronger than mdf, all suitable. If you are painting, pine is my go to as you can cover it ...


3

You'll get similar life from polyurethane and oil paint. It might be wise to use a satin or matte sheen to reduce the appearance of wear, which is the real issue. You can always recoat if actual wear-through or other damage occurs, but you probably don't want it looking distressed immediately. Epoxy might give a little more hardness and thickness, but it's ...


3

For the best match, cut a thin piece of the same MDF material to fit, and glue it into place with wood glue. MDF is very easy to work with so this would be relatively easy. If the fit is good enough, the glue will fill any of the cracks, or fill them in afterwards with a mixture of wood glue and MDF dust. Keep glue off the surface as it will affect the ...


3

From my experience solid core doors will block sound much better than hollow core. Solid core is also a heavier door which can be a plus although sometimes makes it a little more difficult to install. Also, you want to make sure the door is pre-drilled for your hardware and pre-hung. The Jeld-Wen door you sited is a slab door and is not pre-hung. Slab doors ...


3

There is not a convincing reason this has to be any sort of box structure. In fact for a bed support like that a single USA type of 2x8 (actual 1.5"by 7.5" 38mm by 190mm) on edge on each side of the bed would be way more than enough support. The overall weight can also be accommodated by using proper means to join the ends to the vertical posts. If you ...


2

Everyone has already noted in the comments how and why MDF is not a good material to use around water or moisture and that you'll likely have future issues so that is not addressed in this answer. This answer is for the case that you still wish to go forward with your work, perhaps as a temporary fix. Can I just use any undercoat and paint it with any ...


2

If you really want the "best" way, it's going to be to remove the existing door casing and replace it with a smooth 1-by board. Like a 1x8 or 1x6 ripped to the proper width. That would remove the unnecessary door stop trim and give you a nice, smooth opening. If that sounds like too much work (and it is quite a bit of work), then filling the old holes and ...


2

I recently replaced some hollow bi-fold doors that enclosed my air handler for my AC and heating unit. I got the heaviest, highest density, doors I could find. It's amazing how much the sound has been reduced. Definitely go with solid.


2

Looking over the product guides etc. for the JeldWen, it does not say if it is a solid or hollow core door, although its price say solid. Never the less, when looking for sound deadening in doors, always go for density, in this case solid doors. And if both doors are solid, go for the heaviest one. That is if the difference is in pounds. Don't sweat it if ...


2

Drilling holes should help keep the MDF from splitting, take care to keep the holes as far from edges as you can and as straight as possible. Use short screws unless the aluminum edge will need to support the weight of your board (i.e. hanging on the wall by the top frame). If you don't want visible screw heads you can alternatively use a strong adhesive ...


2

I've used MDF to make a table top. (the legs, and upper frame were pine) the strength was fine (I jumped up and down on it etc) I didn't paint it because I wasn't going to do anything wet on it, and I didn't want to have to wait for the paint to cure (which can take weeks after it has dried) if you don't wait things will stick to the paint if left on the ...


1

You can simply grind down the point of the bit you have to suit this job, rather than purchasing another tool and hoping that it will conform to the geometry you need. Nothing says that a tool is unalterable once you own it. Note - do not remove it entirely (that will prove VERY hard to use) and do keep it centered.


1

There is different ways to do this but you could create 3 ledgers going around and lag bolt the front in. You can hide the lag bolts pretty easy. I have done similar type of bunk beds in my beach rentals. I used pine LVLs (both 2x8 and 2x10s) and bolted the front in. Mine were similar with a front ladder, not side. The pine LVLS paint really nice so ...


1

That is a relatively short span and a 2x6 as a beam would support the weight of the bed and things on it (people, etc). The weak point is the connections, use joist hangers at the end for the connection to the post and wall. Then cover with dry wall to make it look nice.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible