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10

1) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'T' cross section. Cut a slot down the middle of the 81" edge of the panel to accommodate it. Dry fit, then assemble with construction adhesive. If desired, 'pin' the T-bar in place with nails or screws through the surface of the door. ... or ... 2) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'U' cross section and 1.5" outside ...


8

How much the shelves will sag depends not only on the materials you use, but also whether or not the shelves are fixed, whether there's a hardwood strip along the length, and how they are attached. The magic number to watch out for is 1/32" (about 0.8 mm) of sag per foot. MDF is incredibly heavy - your bookshelves will weigh a ton if you construct them ...


5

You shouldn't have any problems using MDF. A lot of modern cabinets are made out of MDF these days as it's a cheap material to use. It comes in a variety of thicknesses so you'll be able to get one that meets your requirements. You need to wear a mask when cutting and sanding it as the dust is not very nice. It takes paint well and you should have no ...


5

MDF may be marginally more stable, but in my extensive experience it's far too fragile to be used for house trim. I wouldn't install it if it was free. It dents and scratches like nothing. If you're doing a typical bedroom you shouldn't have field joints, as either is available in 16-foot lengths. Even if you do, a well-glued and well-nailed miter won't ...


4

If it is MDF or HDF (as opposed to particleboard) then I would choose the fiberboard over ply. Any surface wear will impact the finish laminate, regardless of the underlying material. By contrast, MDF/HDF should be more impact resistance, water/mold resistant and uniform in density and composition. MDF above: more uniform and dense. Particle below, less ...


4

I would use MDF. It is uniform, takes paint well and doesn't warp. It also routes well. It should hold the weight I'd expect in a bookshelf (supported at both sides, about 30" wide and no deeper than 18") If you're really concerned with the sagging you might add a single center support bracket.


4

Unfortunately forever is simply impossible ;) Without knowing what/how these planks are going to be used, it is difficult to provide a great answer. I have no real experience with liquid nail, but have used similar types of glue with success, but again, without the what/how you indeed to use these planks... I can't say too much for your case. One issue ...


4

Depends on size. For significant blems, I'd try wood putty, handling it as if it were joint compound. If that didn't work, I might just give up and actually use joint compound... However, remember that for small nichs and scratches paint itself can fill small irregularities, especially if you scuff-sand between coats or otherwise actively level the surface.


4

Depending on how fussy you are, the best thing to look like drywall is drywall. It may also be the least expensive thing that looks like drywall. I have built a bookcase (attached to the floor and ceiling, so functionally a wall) with a drywall backing, mudded the drywall as usual and indeed the other side looks just like a wall. You have to accept that you ...


3

My suggestion would be to embed square tube stock steel into the MDF and epoxy it in. I recently did this exact thing with MDF subtop for my granite counters and uses a polyurethane glue to embed the steel. Check out the pictures here: Can I support a granite countertop overhang with embedded steel bars? Square stock is rigid and cheap. Route a channel ...


3

You probably want an epoxy based filler such as Bondo. A variety of manufacturers have a version of this. These products are a little more complicated to use than traditional wood fillers, but they are pretty impervious to moisture once they harden. You need to mix small batches that can be used in a few minutes. Nitrile/latex gloves are a must. Once ...


3

I would select the product based on the appearance and durability of the finish laminate alone, with little concern for the substrate material, assuming the substrate is some viable material and not pressed paper pulp or something else obviously inferior. For identical finish laminates, MDF would be preferable to plywood as it is denser and more ...


3

There's many variables, many choices. You could just slam some screws into the shelf edges and it may be adequate. Pocket screws are a big improvement because you are no longer screwing into the panel edges. They work really well in cabinet face frames because there is plenty of room for screw embedment. For a bookcase, embedment is limited, so you should ...


3

Not quite the idea you were looking for but one idea might be to use another bookcase so that you have two of them back to back. More storage that way. Now onto your immediate question. I would suggest that you consider a hardboard Masonite type product. This comes in a 4x8 foot sheet that can be cut just to your size. It has a very smooth surface that will ...


3

Mdf is a fair product for the price. I always advise clients to choose real wood if the budget allows. As to what you have heard; Mdf in a dry interior environment will not warp like wood. It should not be installed in kitchens, bathrooms or outdoors. A good carpenter can use wood or mdf to provide pleasant finished details. If you can afford it, choose wood....


3

I would say that MDF is the poor man's luxury product. It cannot handle any moisture but it is smooth, hard, durable and stable (doesn't expand or contract with seasonal change. It takes paint nicely and because it is hard and smooth it requires far less skill in painting to get a great look. It goes up fast and takes paint fast. And if you pre-paint it on ...


2

I would not use MDF in an area with lots of moisture like a bathroom or a garage. It will swell up and degrade quickly if it gets wet. If you do use it in a wet area seal it up well.


2

Nail it. You will forever regret a decision to glue the casing if it ever comes to a need to do repairs or modifications.


2

Super glue might work, although my first thought was to finish the mdf with polyurethane first. This will seal the mdf and allow the adhesive to remain sticky for a long time. Rubbing superglue on the area before the velcro goes on might get the same result too if you don't want to finish the whole thing. I think this is what's going on : the mdf is very ...


2

I've always had very good results when using polyurethane finish on MDF - particularly on edges, where it is absorbed deeply. I have used it to harden the edges and make them more robust. I'd suggest using it for your purpose also - once dry, I would think the edge would be sandable to a very smooth finish. If paint adhesion is an issue, then I suspect ...


2

You could try brushing the edges with glue. I use Weldbond glue for similar purposes. You can dilute it, maybe a thin coat first to penetrate and seal, followed by a thicker coat to finish it. It's available in large sizes if you'll use a lot. Worst case it's a good glue so even if it doesn't work for your application, it will still be good to have ...


2

Larger issue with foam products is that it's a huge fire hazard. Likely hollow wooden (thin plywood and wooden batten) construction. Masonite® (tempered hardboard) would be another suitable sheet material. Could be done in drywall if you were a masochist.


2

I have used heavy white paper and glued this to wood in the past, then it can be textured or painted once the glue dries. (Like a linen white wallpaper). This covers wood grain quite well and it can be skim coated , stomp design or spray textured if desired looks like a sheetrocked wall without the thickness and weight.


2

Lamination is a valid term to use in your application. Countertops are often laminated with Formica™ but I would not consider it to be a product to be rolled on in a manner similar to wallpaper. I tossed a search to the world wide interweb for "thin laminate" and found a product I was unaware existed. It's called cabinet veneer sheet and is produced and ...


2

Most nail guns aren't designed for brick, you'll be putting your self in risk of self harm either from jams or shrapnel when the brick gives way. Getting a slightly smaller masonry drill bit and drill pilot holes that are fractionally smaller and nail in to those is a good option. Especially if you back it up with construction adhesive. The issue is that 1....


2

You absolutely can make any mitre cut with a table saw provided you have the correct jigs and guides. But, it's a LOT simpler and quicker to use a mitre saw to make mitre cuts. For "casual" work or just one-offs, then go ahead and use your table saw. If you're wanting to have quick and repeatable angle cuts, then get a mitre saw. If you have to choose ...


1

You won't get cheaper or easier than two layers of sheet lumber. Particle board is a common component in 30-minute fire doors (though they usually have a hardwood veneer). I'd do just as you plan. Sand or route a bullnose all the way around and seal it with a couple coats of urethane, smoothing with steel wool between.


1

First of all, if anything is rotted, there's a water problem. Make sure that's fixed first. As for the piece that's circled, if that is rotted, then I'm wondering if the water problem is bigger than we think. How's the floor in that area? As for replacing that one piece, there's no easy way to do that as it's likely screwed/nailed and glued. You can ...


1

I have had trouble in locations where moisture may contact MDF moldings (hard floors, mop use). Any moisture penetration at mitered corners or cut ends can cause it to swell, a lot. For a kids's room on carpeted floor it's probably OK but not as durable to impact as real wood (think dents and scrapes). However, good prime coat with high quality gloss paint ...


1

MDF isn't a terrible choice since it's cheap, easy to work with, and dimensionally stable, but it will be ruined if a decent amount of moisture ever penetrates into it, and the glue used to bind the wood particles together is full of formaldehyde, which is a known carcinogen. Wear a respirator while you're cutting it. If this stuff is for a kid's room, ...


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