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3

Starting at the highest corner or spot, and level from there. It can be done a few ways, first you could set the first 2" block far enough from the high side so that it is level with a thin setting bed under it, and fill the rest of the area that is too thin, with masonry cement. Or you could set the 2" block at the highest side, using enough mud to run it ...


2

As long as the old mortar on the wall isn't crumbling you should be able to replace it without too much difficulty. Use a wire brush and get as much of the old mortar off the wall and the tile as you can, especially anything loose. For only one or two tiles I just use a good construction adhesive such as Liquid Nails for marble and tile. Use some spacers to ...


2

You'll need some quality masonry drill bits or some diamond core bits depending on the size of the holes you'll be drilling. The hammer drill you picked out will do the job, just take your time, let the drill do the work. You do not want to use molly anchors. They are for drywall or plaster hollow walls. Personally, I'd be using lag shields, 3/16", and ...


2

"Best" is what you can do in that tight space. If the cavity is filled with masonry it's probably fine. Ideally you'd replace the block with a like block and tuck-point the mortar in place. Might be easier said than done, though.


2

The loose material you are wanting to repair is called "parging". It may be referred to as a skim coat as well. It typically is a coat of mortar, not cement. Mortar has more limestone in it to make it more workable. 11-13 EDIT You can easily remove the bulk of the loose material by tapping the surface with a hammer. It should readily crack and fall ...


2

I would build it more or less exactly as you've sketched it, but on posts like a deck. Don't attempt to suspend it on the block wall. Build a conventional floor system with 2x6 sides and joists on 16" centers, then cover it with 3/4" plywood. Drop six legs to the slab fastened to and supporting the rim joists. I'd probably use one 2x4 under the rim ...


1

Don't seal the brick. It will only prevent adhesive from bonding correctly. If the brick is loose remove it, vacuum the dust and re-install the brick. If the mortar is loose scrape it out and re-point the joint with mortar or concrete caulking. Allow the repair to cure. Brush or vacuum the brick face aand joints to remove any dust and loose debris. Same for ...


1

Removing bricks is easy. It's putting them back up, properly, that takes some skill & experience to do right. It's been my experience that anytime you have someone do brickwork for you it gets expensive. But in your case, if it were me, I would use a circular saw with a concrete cutting blade on it and just cut the bricks below the window vertically ...


1

Doesn't look like the roof has a proper overhang to minimize water running down walls. A gutter would help but the mortar on the outside really needs to be fixed. Fixing the mortar on only the inside will trap the water in the blocks and cause freeze and thaw issues. The moss is bad for the mortar as well. Kill and remove it.


1

I think you have a nice project idea. The type of masonry anchors/screws you choose will be important. I recommend Tapcon screws long enough to use a washer, penetrate the wood/cleat, and go 1.5" into the wall. So that'll probably be 3" in total length. Get the recommended masonry drill bit when you purchase the screws; and install them ...


1

To answer your question, the bottom of your footing needs to be a minimum of 12” below finish grade, where you live. However, I feel you don’t understand the complexity of this project so I’m going to layout a few issues you’ll need to resolve. First, this wall will weigh about 4,800 lbs. (plus weight of your stone veneer) so if it falls over it’s a ...


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Depends on the height of the retaining wall and what it’s holding back. We like footings on undisturbed soil. In fact, depending on the soil we might compact it too. If the soil is soft, we may require a few feet be removed and replaced with compacted gravel. This will help distribute the load over a greater area (the gravel area is usually 2 times wider ...


1

It's done-for. Whenever you have both severe surface degradation and spider cracks there's no turning back time. No patch will hold up with so many independently-movable segments. You'd have to pour a new slab that's robust enough to span such movement. If it didn't cause problems at the door opening you could lay paver bricks over the top. They'd do pretty ...


1

I have seen fine wood dust mixed with a putty of some kind mixed and placed inside gaps, if the wood is stained then also add a little stain to match the color. Sanding down to the exact shape would have been the first step for me then doing the filling.


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Normal settling cracks, would not be worried about it structurally. But... Is it sleeved? Is there a metal pipe inside the chimney? Most municipalities now require you to sleeve a masonry chimney that is carrying CO2 or any other potentially dangerous gas that might leak into your house. Even if you can’t see the cracks, they are there. By running a metal ...


1

Acrylic/Latex: Because concrete is porous, a water-based or acrylic primer is more likely to soak into the concrete than an oil-based primer, bonding to the substrate and allowing the paint to grip the surface. These primers will also reduce the dust on interior concrete.


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Stairs need to be EXTRA safe, because a loose stair is potentially deadly. It's not something you want to mess around with, heavy or not. Could you drill and bolt them toward the back of each tread, running the bolts down into the concrete below the CMU blocks? You could countersink the bolt heads on the tread stone and fill them with sand or something to ...


1

I would use something like a long pan-head Tapcon (maybe a 2.25") with a stainless steel spacer. The Tapcon can grip the masonry, and 1" stainless steel spacers are fairly ubiquitous at your local big box hardware store. Assuming you don't have a hammer drill, buy a normal drill masonry bit. These tend to work better going into brick rather than the masonry,...


1

If, as it appears from your pictures, this is a solid block poured in place of the blocks that are not there in the door opening, on top of the poured foundation wall, 6-8" overhang that thick is not a particular concern for digging away underneath - it's not going to fall off if you're not taking a sledgehammer to it, even if it is unreinforced. If it ...


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