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2

That's insect damage from when the tree was still in the forest. It's not really a problem now since the board has been cooked in a kiln. Any insects have leave the vicinity or been destroyed by heat. A few such boards are common with any unit of lumber, but if you see more than maybe 5% like that I'd be questioning whether your builder is buying from a ...


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Pallet wood is often treated with harsh chemicals for preservation and longevity. I would not recommend using them for furniture or anything you will be in close contact with. Definitely not garden beds, even burning them releases toxic fumes and the ash is toxic too! However with that being said, it IS decent free wood that can still serve many purposes, ...


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Never one to refuse something for free I collected the pallets the local printing shop stacked outside. I sorted through the pallets looking for the cleanest wood slats. I found (2) species of wood used mainly in pallet construction: poplar and oak (not sure red or white), both hard wood species and used in furniture shops. Most of the top slats were ...


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It depends on the pallet. Some pallets are made from absolute garbage wood, junk from day one, then are used and reused for many shipments. They have been cracked up by tons of cargo, bumpy rides on trains and trucks, abuse from pallet jacks and fork lifts, and are destined to be ground up for mulch pretty soon. Those are not going to be good for much. On ...


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Pallets will end up costing you quite a bit of money in the damage to your tools. They’re loaded down with dirt from being loaded and dragged across the ground, both inside warehouses and outside. There’s nothing that dulls a blade faster than dirt and grit, not even metal when you accidentally forget to pull out one of the nails. Dull tools are extremely ...


1

I'd say no. One Halloween we were going all out and making a lot of decorations. My wife brought home some pallets. "Look what I got - free wood", she said. Well, sometimes free is a high price to pay. We decide to build a mock up of an electric chair. What a giant pain in the you-know-what to pry those pallets apart. Like one poster said, the have ...


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It's certainly possible. Famously, Bob Taylor made top-grade guitars from pallet wood. In his case, as the link says, the point wasn't to prove that the wood was any good - it was for bragging rights to prove that he was just that good at making guitars. Does that mean the resulting instruments were better than one built with proper tonewoods? Not so much....


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This is an alternative POV Pallets are for shipping and bonfires.


4

TL;DR What's stopping you from dismantling one? You will quickly formulate an opinion of whether it's worth it or not. Pallets are usually held together with nails that have a barbed shank or rings which provide impressive holding power. Getting even a single board off is an impressive feat. You can save yourself considerable headache if you just run a ...


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TLDR: In addition to the time to dismantle the pallet, consider the possible chemical treatment of the wood and possible contamination from previous use. Wood pallets can be chemically treated to make them more durable. Several online sources provide information about how to determine what kind of treatment the pallet has undergone. Here's a nice summary of ...


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I'll also mention that pallet wood can be chemically treated to prevent rot, so it may not be suitable for all applications. You'd never want to use chemically treated wood for any projects that will touch food, like a cutting board or a raised garden bed. Some pallets will have a stamp on them that gives information about where the pallet came from and how ...


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Recovering the wood itself is likely "not worth it". However, wooden pallets are already processed into a usable structure. Why destroy it? Some quick Googling reveals many projects people have made out of wooden pallets themselves. That's likely the best use of them rather than thinking of them as sources of recovered lumber.


17

It depends what "worth it" means, because I would say it's much like other hobbies or activities that one can do. Is it worth it making your own candles? Your own quilts? Your own tri-level deck out back? That's something a stranger can't easily quantify. Economically, unless your time is really cheap (eg. you're young/old), it's not worth it from ...


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