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The question leaves too many unknown factors for an estimate, even using lumber loading tables. Some that come to mind: Load concentration: If most of the weight is transferred through to the casters, it'll carry whatever the casters tolerate. If the load is mushy, the failure point would be at the center of the span. Dynamic forces due to movement: Will ...


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I would use two 4x4s in the long dimension, or maybe 2x6s if you can stand the height. The 4x4s have more width and will be easier to attach casters to. Definitely not 1/4" plywood, it has no structural strength at all. It is used for cabinet backs and similar applications. You want at least 5/8". Unless your floor is really smooth, there will be a lot of ...


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The 2x4's are also the problem. You want to support this from casters only on the corners. That means you need an 8 foot span, as well as a 4 foot cross-span, and you need to keep all this rigid so it doesn't spread and lose strength. Half of the structure is the wood to carry the weight. The other half is to keep the first half from twisting or ...


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http://www.pacificwoodlaminates.com/img/PDFs/APA/APA_LoadSpanTables.pdf Table 2 Face grain PARALLEL to supports At 1000#/32sf = 31.25 psf (pounds/square foot) Therefore, you will require at least 5/8 (Bending = 37) Note: Bending means how much it can support if you don't care how much it will sag. L/360 - L/180 are measure of stiffness used if you were ...


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The 2x4s are not the problem. The plywood is the problem. I would go for a minimum 1/2" plywood, possibly even 3/4". That will make it a lot heavier - but also a lot sturdier. Since you are putting it on casters, the weight of the plywood should not be a big deal but also make sure the casters are rated for the total weight (1,000 lbs+).


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I've tried a few cuts like this and got one of the crazy devices shown below. It's a "multi angle measuring ruler". Even if you get the angles right, you still have to cut the wood accurately and that requires a good miter saw, and even then, be prepared to do it a few times to get the saw set just right. This is an art and it takes a lot of practice It's ...


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The T bevel gauge would be a good assist in some of the cutting, but I would use thin strips of wood, say about 1 1/2" X 1/8" thick and hot glue the corners. I would not use anything thicker for it would change the length of the finished piece. No need to cut all the way into the corners, the straight lines could be simply projected to intersect. The bevel ...


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