Hot answers tagged

28

Almost all of the Home Depots that I do business with have short term rental trucks available right in their parking lots for very reasonable rates. Call in and reserve one for a particular time. Drive to the Home Depot in your car and park it in the lot. Go inside and checkout the truck. Then drive it up and load all of your materials and head home with it ...


24

You didn't mention how you're using the ratchet straps, but from your concern about slipping, I think it's possible that you could be using them to better advantage. So I apologize if this is what you're already planning to do, but just on the off chance it isn't... For the MDF, you want the straps going over the edge of the MDF and running straight down to ...


21

You can find “straight grain” lumber, but most people don’t know how to order it and most “yards” (Home Depot, etc.) won’t order a small amount (half units, etc.). Lumber is divided into three “Grades”: boards, dimensional, and timber. Further, dimensional and timbers are graded into “light framing”, decking, beams, timbers, etc. Those grades are further ...


20

I've worked through hundreds of units of framing lumber over the last 30 years, and the difference between big box lumber and "lumber yard" lumber is insubstantial, on average*. In fact, it's often better from big boxes due to higher customer expectations. The local HD competition were actually forced to raise their lumber quality to compete on ...


18

If buying rough hardwood (from a mill or reasonable hardwood supplier, perhaps even one that will plane for you), buy 5/4 or even 6/4 rather than 4/4 boards. 13/16" planed is about as much as you can hope for from 4/4 rough. Normally 5/4 should be plenty for true 1 inch planed.


17

It depends what "worth it" means, because I would say it's much like other hobbies or activities that one can do. Is it worth it making your own candles? Your own quilts? Your own tri-level deck out back? That's something a stranger can't easily quantify. Economically, unless your time is really cheap (eg. you're young/old), it's not worth it from ...


15

Technically, the 1x8 is 3/4" THICK, not "high". That's nitpicking, though. A 1x8 is always specified as a "1x8", never by actual stock thickness in softwoods (ie pine). A nominal 1" plank will always be 3/4" thick after planing, a nominal 2" plank will always be 1-1/2" thick after planing. Width is a little different, but follows generally the same rules - ...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


12

From the similarity of the lines, I'd say you pulled something out of the old 2x4 (nails) and dragged them across the board, perhaps as you twisted and pulled to separate/remote the board from wherever it was before. I don't believe there are any insects that travel in perfect unison like that.


12

I don't like any of the A-C options presented here, the beam is a very important structural component and incorrect beam installations can compromise the entire deck. Shims, shortcuts and hoping for shrinkage are inappropriate. I would either: D) Return/exchange the bad board for one that is proper size. E) Trim the larger beam member to the same width (...


12

For sure, find a wood distributor in your area. These cater to professionals and might chop up a long board for you with a circular saw so it fits in your van. My friends and I have bought oak and redwood from this kind of place. I got huge chunks of oak; 1" thick is no problem. They'll carry only common woods used for large-scale construction, plus ...


9

The reason given these days is quite a bunch of BS. The real reason is the lumber mills decided some decades ago to cut green wood smaller - getting more boards out of a log. The shrinkage continues even now as you'll notice all lumber sizes are shrinking even with the "reason" that was sold to the public as to why the boards are not full measurements. It ...


9

Most mills do not produce and sell treated wood rated for contact with the ground, so any wood in your deck that will be in contact with the ground should be treated, and gotten wherever it is to be got. Buying wood from a mill is often cheaper, though it is not always. A smaller operation with a smaller economic influence (like most mills open to the ...


8

You might find this interesting: History of Yard Lumber Size Standards From the summary Economic pressures among the regional areas of lumber production have resulted in a decrease of standard lumber sizes over the period covered by this history. It goes into a lot of interesting detail.


8

I think you're overthinking this. I carry all kinds of lumber on my roof rack all the time. The 2x4s are no problem at all. Just strap them down tight, one at the front bar and one at the back bar. Sheets goods are harder. Your drawing is completely not to scale and I think you will be surprised how big 4x8 is when you get it up there. However as long as ...


8

It is not feasible to sand down a wooden member by a whole half of an inch. If something is too long then cut off the additional half inch using a saw. If something is too thick (wide) by the half inch then rip saw off that extra thickness or use a planer to remove it. If you cut something too short you will have to go get a replacement piece and re-cut ...


6

I would cut off the timber in the ground using a Sawzall type tool (reciprocating saw) that has a long rough cut blade installed. You can get blades as long as 12 inches that can easily reach into tight spots and cut the wood. Soil will wear the teeth away fairly quickly and so be prepared to replace the blade. I've used this technique to cut roots free ...


6

Do NOT stick a board out your window! The board will be angled outward, making your overall vehicle significantly wider than usual. Worse, you will not be able to judge how far it sticks out. Misjudge and someone gets killed. Why not simply put it on your roof and tie it down to the front and back bumpers (or better, the tow points under the bumpers). Any ...


6

The MDF might be a problem. When driving at any appreciable speed the sheet will catch air and try to sail up and away. This is compounded by the air that is pushed up and over your hood and windshield, right up into the MDF. I had two sheets of particle board that broke off where the straps were holding them down. It wasn't a clean break :) I would ...


5

Use a prybar to lever up the treads about 1/8" and then use a Sawzall type reciprocating saw with a metal blade to cut the shank between the tread and the riser. Check to see if you can rent the reciprocting saw at a tool rental. The blades are readily available at any Hardware and Tool supply. You won't be wanting to drive back into the same hole as the ...


5

The joists are almost certainly taking some tension load (keeping the walls from spreading) from the roof, at least, unless it's very strangely built. As is, given a quick look at load calculators and those inputs, probably not. even reducing live and dead loads to 20PSF (minimum live load for a "storage attic" and a pretty low storage load) and allowing ...


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...


5

The spikey washer needs to go between pieces of wood. I doubt its usefulness, since the strength is either going to come from the bolt in shear, or friction between the wood surfaces, depending on how tightly it's bolted. The teeth won't fix poor clamping. A lockwasher needs a lot of compression to function properly, it's really intended for metal. If ...


5

I would refrain from using that type of fastener. I believe it will allow a lot of movement. I made a sketch to show what I have made before, many years ago. It does not have any hangers just angled notches that allow the legs to fit tightly and notches that act as a setting for the beam to bear on. A single bolt will draw it all together, or two could be ...


5

I literally buy pressure-treated wood sight-unseen. I live near a chain of lumber yards that offers convenient delivery at a reasonable price. They offer pressure-treated fence posts with a consistent quality level, which is appropriate for my uses of the lumber. I can call them up, ask for a number of fence posts cut to a particular length, and arrange ...


5

This has been a well-known issue since the pandemic started. Materials have been scarce, and prices have increased dramatically. This seems to be due to issues on both the supply and the demand sides. Supply has decreased because of obvious issues related to COVID, workers being sick with COVID, factories having to shut down for periods of time, and working ...


5

The problem with today’s lumber it comes off much smaller trees and unless #2 or better kiln dried it can look like what you are finding. Today to get what you have you basically have to purchase vertical grain lumber (way expensive). Sometimes it gets mixed in the sorter but you have do dig through a unit to find it if the mill does both like mine. In any ...


4

+1 on the stainless fasteners. TheSean, you're actually working with that pressure-treated lumber in its IDEAL condition for working. After it dries, it'll become much much harder & more prone to splitting. Right now it's very resilient, and every fastener you drive into it "wet" will become tighter as the wood dries out. Too, dried PT lumber will give ...


4

Any 'credible and/or official sources' will tell you to hire a Structural Engineer, which is what I'll say also. There are too many variables and unknowns for Internet advice to suffice. Prepare well to minimize costs, supplying all dimensions and drawings, and schedule a site visit. The Engineer may be able to give the details for a top truss run ...


4

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


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