13

Lock cylinders. Never in lock cylinders. Doorknobs, padlocks, etc. - the residue left will just attract dirt & grit, and prematurely wear down the works. This was given me by a college friend whose dad worked on the maintenance staff - so they did a lot of locks!! It probably took years to see the pattern, but any lock they had shot with WD-40 ...


12

Personal experience: An electrician told me never to squirt WD40 into an electric motor (bathroom exhaust fan) as it can be ignited.


11

It never should be used on AirSoft or PaintBall weapons as it melts the seals.


10

I read an article once by a clock repairman who described how bad WD-40 is for precision clockworks. The main reason has been given already: it attracts dirt, which acts as an abrasive and eventually gums up the action.


8

I'd agree with the comment that you may have another problem. What size is the conduit? Are you pulling or pushing (pulling is what works, pushing won't.) If you need something to pull with, use a shop-vac to get a rope through the conduit first. Braided hollow rope can be nice as you can expand the end and use it like a Chinese finger cuff to grab the ...


7

Brake Fluid is not a lubricant, but a glycol based hydraulic fluid designed to have a high boiling point and to absorb water to prevent corrosion (why the brake system should be completely bled out every so often). Power Steering fluid and Transmission fluid are petroleum based hydraulic fluids, more useful for their ability to transmit pressure, resist ...


7

No, the intelligent (budget-concious) solution in this case is to use the cat3 conductors and any of various schemes to run ethernet over them; starting with the base case that 10Mbit ethernet runs happily on Cat3 wire, and many Cat3 wires are actually fine for 100 Mbit. Those are "free" solutions. You could put trunking switches on either end and run a ...


6

You can remove the oil film with a rag or paper towel soaked in some organic solvent like isopropyl alcohol. Don't these windows have any stop so they can be left ajar without blowing open? It might be good to install something like that instead. A long hook and eyelet would be the simplest.


6

Replace it. There is nothing to "lubricate" (it's already full of oil) and if there was it would not increase resistance. You have some sort of failure in the valving/orifices that restrict the flow of the oil inside the cylinder and convert motion to heat. They are more directly analogous to shock absorbers (as on your car) than "hydraulic cylinders" and ...


6

If you're open to buying a new toilet seat you can find seats with stiff hinges such as this: EZ Close seat Random example, never used above product... With little kids in the house, I've picked up a few of these type of seat from a local home store. They are marketed as "Slam free", "slow close", "quiet close" and similar. The hinge provides enough ...


6

Here's the relevant bit, which includes some liability tone: Your tool was properly lubricated before leaving the factory. In from two to six months, depending upon use, take or send your tool to an authorized service center for a complete cleaning, inspection and lubrication. Tools used constantly on production jobs will need relubrication more often....


5

Looks like we can finally put this tired disagreement to bed, so to speak:


5

The drill you display is for DIY use (as opposed to professional use), so it's designed to be durable enough for years of typical DIY usage. So it has no user-serviceable parts - even its brushes will last for about one hundred hours of motor running and you're not expected to think of what happens to them after that one hundred hours. That's why you really ...


5

No on the brake fluid and no on the steering fluid. If the fan has a fitting to apply oil use a light oil like 3 in 1 home lubricant. If the fan isn't equipped with an oiling port you will have to disassemble the fan to gain access to the bushings or bearings.


5

It's a standard single-pole, single-throw switch? Just replace it. They cost $1 or so, and it's not worth the hassle to figure out what's wrong with the current one.


4

The nominal diameter of #8 stranded copper with insulation is just over .21 inches. You are trying to pull 4 of these wires through 3/4 inch pipe. I'll bet the 4 wires together have a diameter of .5 inches (in the best case where the wires are still straight and have no bends.) That's a tight fit over 25 feet. I don't know if you are using a mechanical ...


4

This page on YaleDoor.co.uk http://www.yaledoor.co.uk/blog/post/2012/05/01/Home-Door-Lock-Maintenance-Tips.aspx Says the opposite ... "Any, “all purpose” oil or lubrication will do the job, but be sure never to lubricate your door locks with powder graphite, as it will do more harm than good. Simply insert the straw (which is normally supplied with ...


4

It attacks polycarbonate windows such as Tufak or Lexan too. Shooting through a bullet proof window after applying is NOT recommended.


4

It might be OK for a bit but I probably wouldn't do it. You could look up your owner's manual to see if they say anything. If you must use the chainsaw and have nothing else on hand, surely motor oil is better than nothing. I think bar oil is stickier than regular motor oil to prevent splattering as much. FWIW I like to buy the "biodegradable" chain oil, ...


4

I keep two things on hand, which covers 99% of use cases: Household (3-in-1) oil Teflon spray (or silicone) The former is good for quick squeak fixes where dust accumulation isn't much of a concern. I use it for window blind gears, motor bearings, etc. The latter dries to a film and tends to stay cleaner. I use it for window hardware , shelf guides, and ...


3

Vegetable oil should NEVER be used to lubricate mechanical parts. It always leaves a solid deposit which later will be stuck to the parts you wanted to lubricate.


3

WD-40 is for displacing water, hence the initials. It's not made for anything else. The rest is marketing spit and sparkle. Seriously if that same marketing team had worked for Jiffy peanut butter, there'd be a can of that on your toolbox instead of WD-40. In every category in which people use WD-40, there are better products. Think of it as the "...


3

Don't ever use WD-40 on something that has already been lubricated (like with white lithium grease, etc). The WD-40 will break down the grease and make a real mess.


3

For the same reason you wouldn't use it on door hinges, it should never be used for chair and sofa mechanisms. Because WD-40 attracts dust and turns things black, over time that dirt accumulation within the moving parts will build up and eventually start to fall off onto carpeting creating a terrible black mess that is nearly impossible to remove.


3

The oil that you applied to the crank joints is doing several things. Foremost it has eliminated the dryness in the joints that led to the squeaking. It is flushing out the years worth of wear dust and particulate that collected in the joints from operating them without lubrication. Oil present on the joints now will be a magnet for new dust and dirt from ...


3

WD-40 is a penetrating oil and corrosion preventative. As a lubricant, it is quite short term as it tends to evaporate. And the lubrication type for an electric motor depends on the type of bearing. Ball bearings require grease. Flush the bearing with solvent to clean out the old gunk and pack with a light bearing grease. Oilite style sleeve bearings ...


3

Grease would be better than graphite. Work it in with a toothpick if you don't have a greasegun with a needle-tip.


3

You should be able to adjust the roller height by accessing an adjustment screw through a hole at the sides/ends of the bottom frame piece. Spray the adjustment screw assemblies with penetrating oil then lower the door completely by backing out (loosening) the adjustment screws; then lift the door up into the upper track and swing inward to remove it. Be ...


3

You have some other possible solutions if you do not want to replace with another lid as suggested in the comments. You could make a loop of cord or ribbon that attaches to the back of the cistern lid that you pickup and loop around the lid when it is in the UP position. You could get some of the white stick on Velcro material and put one piece on the top ...


3

You will spray motor oil everywhere, and you will run out of oil quickly, and then burn up the bar and chain. That being said, I sometimes use a mix of bar and gear oil or motor oil in winter, when it's so cold outside that the bar oil won't flow quickly enough. On such days, I would only mix about 1 part motor oil with 10 parts bar oil (or 1 part gear oil ...


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