34

That is a wired telephone junction block. The wire coming through the wall may very well be where the original land line entered the house from outside. The other wire is probably going off to some phone jack in another part of the house.


31

That appears to be a central vacuum system. The LV wire is to turn the vacuum on via a relay. Hard to tell from the picture if the end of the wire has simply been tucked into the pipe awaiting the final cover-plate install that it will be pulled out and wired to (correct) or if some genius ran the wire inside the vacuum tubing (incorrect.) I would bet on the ...


16

If you read up on the standards for datacom cabling, you might end up with your head spinning. Those standards are very demanding and detailed. They do make sense for big installations in commercial buildings, hospitals, data centers, etc. But keep in mind, you'll also find tons of material based on partial understanding of the industry standards, and some ...


12

Simple cup hooks will suffice $5 for a pack of 25. src If screwing into the bottom, then at the first joist, you have two of them about an inch apart, and you face them opposite directions (not like in the photo). That way, to get the cable into them, you have to zig-zag it. This assures the cables will not escape. Then every couple of joists, you have ...


11

This question already has a very good answer but I wanted to provide a couple of pictures that will provide some additional clarity to the installation and usage.


10

The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT (...


10

This is what ENT (or any sort of conduit) is for If you want to leave "room for installing wires in the future" in an electrical installation, you put a conduit in the wall so that the installer who is doing the pulls can actually do the pull without getting wires damaged on edges and whatnot. For data wiring, electrical nonmetallic tubing (ENT) ("smurf ...


10

This answer is from an Australian (licensed cabler) perspective. Based on the fact you have metal conduit and a basement, I'm assuming you're in the US/Canada. The rules here are definitely open to interpretation, but there are two main clauses from AS/ACIF S008:2006 - clauses 8.1 and 8.6 that apply here (in AU): Telecommunications cabling must be supported ...


8

A few things to add to the other answer It was probably an older 4-pin jack that went there. This was the forerunner for the modern (and considerably more compact) RJ-11 jack you would recognize. Interestingly enough, the wiring hasn't changed, just the jack. You can actually get adapters for them since some houses still have them Even though these are low ...


7

Electrical Metallic Tubing (Type EMT) Pros Protection from physical damage Larger internal area (1/2" EMT = 0.622 in. ID) Available in sizes over 2" Easy to push through closed walls and bored holes. Can be used as equipment grounding conductor Cons Requires fittings Costs slightly more ($0.256/ft.) More difficult to cut More difficult to bend ...


7

Cable companies should not be penetrating the building with cables like the way you describe. Water can flow down this wire and into the building if it's not sealed properly. And if it is sealed properly, if the wire is able to be moved in and out because it's not securely anchored then it will eventually be able to leak should water get around it. Have ...


7

Sorry if this simple answer comes across as too basic. But you really could get the decided by looking at your own setup. Rewire at the end that has more slack cable in case you need to cut it off some to re-do it. Evaluate if the wall jack is reliable if re-wired. It may need replacing if not reliable for multiple re-configurations. Evaluate if the press ...


7

Many camera's like this popular Lorex model: come with a small 2" surface mounting "Plate" that you can use if you don't have electrical box mounting. They also screw into a 1/2" weatherproof threaded knockout, so that they can be used with 4" weatherproof flood light accessory plates:


7

That's telephone. It's not a transformer. It's a terminal block. Call up the phone company and ask them to have someone come out and show you where your point of demarcation is. That's where the wires stop being their responsibility and start being your responsibility (unless you have an in-house service plan as part of your bill). It looks like an ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


7

I like using these in my attic, even though they are designed for Romex. I like how they can clip multiple cables in. Sometimes I replace the nail with a screw for easier installation. Multi-Cable Staples (20-Pack)


6

There is a discussion of stranded vs. solid wire for speaker cable here. The consensus (or at least the weight of opinions) seems to be that there is a theoretical difference, but no practical difference. Speaker wire is also called lamp cord. It is basically parallel stranded wire in either 16 or 18 gauge. The lower number indicates the thicker wire. 16 ...


6

Most likely not code compliant, at least - the insulation fire rating is what matters there - if you can read off any codes on the side of the cable jacket it might be possible to be more certain. I'd suggest two boxes and a short section of conduit, as much because it will make it easier to replace when some new thing comes along in a few years, as for ...


6

I recently had the opportunity to do this on an out-room on the other side of the garage. It just had wood veneer and no insulation, so the gut was pretty pain free. I'm a forward thinker, but dropping RG6 or Cat 5e/6 into the wall would have been too expensive (and I have no idea where to run it to). What I opted to do was add a low voltage gang and then ...


6

This is a case where what ordinarily would be a Class 2 control circuit is redesignated as a Class 1 control circuit, as per Exception 2 to 725.130(A): Exception No.2: Class 2 and Class 3 circuits shall be permitted to be reclassified and installed as Class 1 circuits if the Class 2 and Class 3 markings required in 725.124 are eliminated and the ...


6

For a fixed run, I use ring-type wire ties (they have a ring at one end for a screw to hold them in place) and I would screw them into the framing in this case. They are much less fuss than the plates you screw in and then attach a wire tie to. DO NOT "pull them as tight as you can" or you may damage the cables, particularly at corners. If ...


5

A Non Contact Voltage Detector doesn't replace the need for a Voltmeter but it is an item I keep in my pocket as a quick verification of AC Power. If I cut the power, I'll do a quick test before I go into a wall box to make sure it is cut. If it indicates power when I don't expect it, I will use the volt meter at time to see what it is. I do get a ...


5

Even with a small charger like you have if a bird is eating at the fence line and touches the fence ! Wham ! It is dead. We spray our fence line to keep the horses and grass / berry vines from shorting the fence out. Our charger is a 50 mile running at 15KV with no shorts from grass/ berries before we started weed eating and spraying we did have a few dead ...


5

You need a LAN Tracer This one is from Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Upgraded-VicTsing-Ethernet-Telephone-Tracking/dp/B008G8KE90 Connect the sender to one end of the cable, and use the tone receiver to track the cable in the wall. More expensive tracers can tell you the length of the cable up to the break - but I prefer the tone, which tells you exactly ...


5

Don't guess. Pull conduit and add whatever the future calls for. The main thing to be thinking about in low-voltage is POWER. Solar panels continue to get cheaper, and batteries are getting cheaper too. It is very reachable to have a 12 volt system capable of powering chest freezer, auxiliary LED lighting, Internet modem and router and USB charge ...


5

It's not required, but there's no harm in doing so. I'd mostly detach them from the yellow cable and bring the nuts up above the insulation level in case you need to find them later.


5

Filling uncharted waters While the use of innerducts (conduits inside conduit, basically) is not completely unheardof (NEC 800.110(A)(3) permits purpose-built innerducts for communications work, which is where they are usually found, and the Code is silent otherwise about "nesting" Chapter 3 conduit types within each other), the problem with any ...


5

You can block it. However, you should consider one of three other options: Disconnect - Find the other end. Disconnect it. Label it ("living room bookcase"). That way if someone (including yourself) years from now looks at the tangle of wiring and wonders "Hmmm, maybe this wire might go where I need it" or "What does this do, can I ...


4

The easiest is to get an extension cord for the low voltage cable on the AC adapter. Most likely the adapter comes equipped with a 2.1mm or 2.5mm center pin barrel type power plug. Extension cords for these are readily available. One would look like this: The extension cable would allow you to power the router from within the same room from an electrical ...


4

If the wires are for low voltage application such as connecting 12V up to LED Strip lighting then you should consider just using twist on wire connectors instead of soldering. These have a decided advantage in that they can be removed for future wire changes and they provide an insulated cover over the wire join. To keep strain off the low voltage wiring ...


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