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60

Call your local police department and inquire about a "Knox Box Key". They probably have a master already to open one. You will need to buy the one they suggest or have a locksmith get involved to match their key to the box you purchase. They might even have a system set up for your community that you don't know about.


49

See the lock insides? That's a metal sleeve, with an inside sliding piece. That inside sliding piece is connected to the latch bolt. Push it to the left, and voila! Some additional details. This is what you see when you remove the knobs, shaft and escutcheons from a knob set. The central shaft, which is has a flat, vertical cross-section, goes through that ...


25

The least expensive solution here is to buy a combo lock key box. You place a key to your home inside, put the box somewhere accessible outside and, if you call 911, you simply provide them the location and code. Just be sure to reset the code between uses. Alternatively you could buy a door lock with a keypad (example) but this route is far more expensive.


25

Actually, they do. Look at the packages for "Key Numbers" Every lock package will have a prominent 3-5 digit "Key Number" somewhere on the outside of the package, typically the back. All packages with the same key number use the same key. So if you have 3 knobs and 2 deadbolts you all want keyed alike, buy 3 knob+deadbolt sets of the same number. ...


18

We were all young once. You need a Torx screwdriver of the appropriate size https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx Actually due to the pin in the middle it is more technically security Torx. Harbour Freight will get you out of trouble cheaply.


18

My mother lives alone and is in a wheelchair so she has limited mobility. She has a number code door control and local EMS has the code on file. She also has a "I've fallen and I can't get up!" service and they have a record of the code as well.


16

One option would be to drill holes through the post to allow you to use the lock that you have (or perhaps a slightly longer lock).


14

These are usually called "rim locks" in North America and the UK. Maybe different elsewhere.


13

I have usually seen these just called "surface-mount locks". I have never seen "rim lock" used in the (Eastern) USA.


10

Installation instructions depend on the exact model of "electronic door lock" you purchase. Most of the low-cost/self-contained units install into a standard cylindrical-lock bore (ie, in place of the normal knobset and/or deadbolt), occasionally with another hole or two to anchor them firmly in place. That's an easy retrofit. Commercial-type units, where ...


10

It would be fairly easy to retrofit a proper locking latch. Product link (for reference only) Here's one that locks from either side. You'd need to grind off the old one, drill for the new one, paint, and mount the new one.


10

One option is to buy a 'smart lock' that gives you the ability to unlock the door from device such as smart phone or tablet. If you carry a smartphone around, this might be a viable option. I feel obligated to note, however, that products in the 'internet of things' (IOT) space have notoriously poor software security practices. For example, a lot of ...


9

Remove the pins from the hinges. You should then be able to pivot the door out of the opening. Once the door is removed you can remove the screws that hold in the strike bolt.


9

You say "they don't need to be high security our anything", so perhaps you could consider SmartKey - Re-Key Technology & Key Control - Weiser. You can rekey them yourself in literally 10 seconds each. The first time you do it, it will take you longer, simply because you've never done it before, but it really is trivially simple to do. Any time you ...


9

According to a german key manufacturer catalog, this is a Drilled, Corrugated bit (Buntbart) with about 14 mm bit length and unknown bit height. It seems to fit a larger variant of Keyway 7 of a "Möbel- und Truhenschlüssel":


8

take the lock to your local home store that carries this line of locks. they will remove the core and put it in a SmartKey Reset Cradle. this returns the lock to an unprogrammed state. there is no way to do this yourself without disassembling the lock core, and there's about a bazillion point 2 pieces in there.


8

Glue could fail and/or look ugly. Other options cost money. When you remove the inside knob, you will see a connecting rod protruding from the latch mechanism that engages the lock button. Cut this off so it no longer engages the lock button. Do not cut the semi circular shaft that engages the main lever! Ensure the remaining stub is turned to the unlock ...


8

The big disadvantage is having to keep two keys with you instead of just one. If you lose your keys (or someone steals them) both keys are compromised so there's not an advantage to having two different keys in that case. The only advantage I can see is if you frequently need to let other people into your house. You could hide the door knob key or give it ...


8

There are cable locks that have a plain end to the cable that might fit through. You might have to file the hole a little bigger in the lock mechanism to allow the end of the cable to angle through. There are also shorter cable locks, but they tend to have a beefier cable end that is captive within the locking mechanism. Images and links are for ...


8

The mortise lock type for the key that you depict has a single locking mechanism that can be reached by the key inserted from either side of the door. The cylinder lock you refer to is actually two separate cylinders that are keyed alike, that each have a simple rod at their back that activates the lock mechanism.


7

As for expanding the hole, I am still confident this post will answer your question. Regarding the Schlage deadbolts, these are not great deadbolts. If you really want high security, you need to look at Mult-T-Lock or Medeco. These are far more secure for a number of reasons. First, they are made of much harder metals - if you feel them compared to ...


7

Get some lock deicer/lubricant. It's sold specifically for this and contains graphite and methanol. Shake well before applying. The methanol removes water and oil from the lock mechanism and leaves behind graphite well flooded through every nook and cranny in the device. You use graphite because it's a dry lubricant and unlike oil, it doesn't attract dirt or ...


7

Looks like they had a "jimmy-proof deadbolt" on the door. You should be able to pickup one at any major hardware store.


7

You can try a different search phrase as "Thumb Turn Security Latch". There is a seller on eBay that has new stock available in range of finishes. Here is a picture of the offering. Considering the price you may just want to consider purchasing new units instead of trying to locate parts for the old ones that are broken. The trade name for these seems to ...


7

Lacking any regular tools, a pair of scissors works great. Open up the scissors to a cross, and push one blade all the way into the hole in the metal part then turn. You can use the other handle as a lever if it is tight. Hey presto, she be open. DISCLAIMER: Do not cut yourself or run with this tool, or use your spouse's good tailoring scissors.


7

That looks like a Euro cylinder lock. You can remove it by undoing one bolt in the edge of the door then insert the key, turn an eighth of a turn and pull the cylinder out. Then measure the lengths in the diagram below. Or just measure externally. You should get an anti-snap lock which means you need to specify which of the measurements applies to the ...


7

The key codes are on the packages go through their inventory and pick out 3 with the same key code, this is how I do it without any extra charge.


7

Those locks nearly always have multiple wafers/levers/tumblers that match specific notches that are cut into the key; these are not visible from the outside. So even though the necessary key profile is discernible in the pictures, there is no way to tell what particular key cut will work. If it was so easy then the lock would be pointless as anybody could ...


6

I've done it and you don't need the original key or a SmartKey. Disassemble it right down to the core. There will be two slip rings that can be pushed off with a flat blade screwdriver to allow you to get the core apart. Gently slide the outer cylinder off the inner core, remove the little bar in the center of the inner core and then lift off the slider-...


6

Another option is to take the lock to a locksmith and have it re-keyed to a new key (and get a bunch of copies of that key). I have heard that this can cost less than the cost of a new doorknob. However, as this would involve removing the knob and taking it the locksmith, I would probably just get a new knob and replace it (unless you really like the style/...


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