6

Unfortunately, you NEED to remove or cover the old vinyl. If you attempt to tile over an unsecure base, you are wasting yout time and money because the tile will not stay down. In your case, if you go over the splitting vinyl, the vinyl will continue to separate and up will come the tiles. If you go over the paper layer, the mortar/quickset will not stick ...


4

The substrate you currently have is probably (90%+) not good enough for a ceramic install. I would think that you need to put at least 1/2" concrete board down and possibly plywood before that (depends on the room size and what is below this). Thinset doesn't really bond much to wood. If you have demo'ed 20-30 bathrooms where people tiled right to wood (...


4

You are far more likely to die from worrying about asbestos than from asbestos. I just finished dealing with the same thing you are. Where possible, I installed engineered flooring and underlayment over the linoleum. They look killer! :) My mother, a retired cyto-technologist, kind of laughed at me about my own asbestos concerns. http://fumento.com/...


3

You could use an aluminum transition strip from the vinyl to the tile. Some types of transition strips are really intended to be installed under the higher tile layer so this may limit your ability to hide fasteners that secure the strip in place. Here are some examples: ... You can normally find an assortment of different styles of aluminum transition ...


3

We managed to do by purchasing a roll of white vinyl dance floor from Harlequin and attaching it to the stage using floor tape. It was relatively easy to lay - we cut it using a Stanley knife and with ~10 students attached it to the floor over about an hour. Our choice was primarily driven by budget, time constraints and limited woodworking experience - it ...


3

You should be able to remove the carpet and padding without disturbing the tile. Then you can install a floating laminate wood floor without any concern. A hardwood floor that requires nailing would be a bigger concern.


2

Linoleum can be a total bear to remove in and of itself. If the substrate is screwed or nailed down then it shouldn't be too bad but if it's glued to the sub-floor then you're gonna have a bad time. If I had to guess then there might very well be hardwood flooring beneath the linoleum which may have been sanded down to accommodate the linoleum's thickness. ...


2

First off that appears to be cheap PVC (Vinyl) sheet, not linoleum (linoleum is a natural product made from flax seed). And the term 'grout' may set someone on the wrong path helping you. Your faceless home store will have a variety of vinyl sheet goods glues and seam sealers for this purpose. The seam sealer is probably the best bet as it comes in the ...


1

The answer is no gap. When installing rolled linoleum you do everything possible not to have a gap. If you have a seam most manufacturers have matching sealer to hide and seal the seam so debris cannot get in there and look bad. So do not leave gaps and if you will have a seam get the appropriate sealer to hide it and prevent debris from building up.


1

It is not uncommon to apply a coat of embossing compound over a firmly bonded vinyl floor, then tile right over it. It certainly is not my favorite method, but as long as the existing vinyl is well adhered and not curling at sides etc. the tile should stay down well. Since you have already removed most of the vinyl, I would not worry too much about some ...


1

Buy an asbestos testing kit, follow the directions to take a sample, and mail it to the testing company. If it has asbestos you will have to follow local codes to dispose of it - in many districts it may not actually be regulated for homeowners and you can dispose of it in regular garbage/dumpster. I would wear gloves, mask, etc and dispose of them when ...


1

Linoleum™ is a brand name as well as a material, which makes it somewhat ambiguous here. You're referring to "inlaid" vinyl, where the color is all the way through, as opposed to modern vinyl with a transparent wear layer. Incidentally, Linoleum™ is still in production by Armostrong, and not all of it is inlaid. It's more accurate to say that ...


1

In the US at least, asbestos was used during and after the 70's. I can't speak for Germany. To really know if it contains asbestos or not you'll need to test it. In the US at least you can get a kit for about $10 to collect a sample. Then it's another $40 or $50 for a lab to test your sample. I'd say it's linoleum based on the fiber backing. See if you can ...


1

This doesn't make sense. First if the floor was installed poorly long before you arrived then it wouldn't last that long - maybe 10 years. Asbestos was phased out of tiles in the early 80s. So is your kitchen tile 30+ years old? I cannot see this from a rental property. Now what is under your vinyl, who knows? Also you mentioned that the vinyl is ...


1

The general rule is that anything permanent or structural should be built into the sub floor and the floor built around it. Anything temporary or unattached, like a dishwasher, should go on top of the floor. For cabinets it depends how they are mounted. Base cabinets are usually mounted to the wall, but their bottom framing is usually meant to be flush ...


1

This is mostly a personal choice. With linoleum, the only difference would be in spending the extra money on additional materials to put it under the dishwasher versus just far enough to look good. I recommend doing the countertops before the linoleum only because gravity pulls dirt down - why have the countertop people mess up a brand new floor when you can ...


1

Cabinets (without the decorative toe kick panel yet), then linoleum, then countertops, then dishwasher, then toe kicks.


1

Yes this is no big deal. Given that you might want to glue them anyway to reduce squeaking. If you have big glue pieces hit it with a putty knife but don't need to spend a ton of time on it.


1

There is no way I would use a cork underlayment to make the floors equal. Cork has too many expanding properties. I don't even think you could get the cork to "sit" under a thin laminate. Also cork will feel softer than most other forms of underlayment. To the point where your floors will feel different. I would use plywood or what is under higher floor ...


1

The answer to this is "look at the instructions for the laminate", and see what they say. If you have old-school hard laminate (like you find in schools/government buildings/grocery stores), then it's a nice hard surface and it is fine. If it is resilient flooring (kitchen vinyl), then the answer is read the instructions. If you have big ridges, I'd ...


1

What you seek is a non polar organic solvent. WD-40 is a good stand in, but even better would be xylenes which are usually available at hardware stores (that's basically what goof off is). Really though, any non-polar solvent will work, mineral spirits, turpentine, brake cleaner, gasoline, diesel, tiki touch fuel, ether, THF, or melted lard. The more ...


1

Asbestos tiles can be dangerous but only if they crumble and the asbestos becomes airborne. I'd suggest trying to remove one tile and see how it goes. The process I've used: spray area with water from a mister (keeps dust down) get a tile remover (essentially a large, flat blade on a handle that you can use to pry up the tile) at a low angle, thrust the ...


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