67

In increasing order of difficulty: Write "Leave On" on tape on the switches. What, really, are you worried about? This gives you 99.9% of the result for 0.1% of the effort. Install switch covers. Install key- or code- operated switches. Do something James-Bondy like put in Smart Switches and code the hub to respond to their being turned off ...


56

Yup, that's marketing. And then, these bulbs don't last long, either. They work fine for about 3 months, but then they start randomly getting dim for a minute or two, then getting bright again for a minute or two, over and over. Eventually they just stay dim and then go out a month later. Can someone tell me what the problem is and how to fix it? They are ...


41

As already stated, LEDs can't take the heat. In addition: Many ovens use halogen bulbs instead of "ordinary" incandescent bulbs. These are a type of incandescent light with two key differences: size and heat. The size is irrelevant for most ordinary lamps but great for an oven, where you want something small so that it won't take away from ...


32

You're looking at the problem upside down. You are thinking the smart bulbs are causing it. Actually, the Lutron Caseta dimmer is causing it. The smart bulbs are behaving normally, however their normal behavior is breaking the dimmer. The dimmer can't deal with four smart bulbs downline of it because (very typically) the dimmer doesn't have a neutral and ...


29

There are two completely different thermal objectives First, don't set other stuff on fire. That's decided by the thermal insulation of the fixture (think: thick insulation in down lights) and limits the size (in actual wattage) of any bulb, but it's mainly aimed at incandescents. Incandescent bulbs love hot places and work better there. A fixture succeeds ...


19

The wattage limit on a light fitting is related to the amount of heat generated by a tungsten bulb of that wattage. Putting a 60W bulb in a 40W or 25W fitting is definitely not recommended. However, your choices are both LED bulbs, which a) run cold & b) use a small fraction of the rated power. They give tungsten bulb wattage equivalents as people ...


18

Advertising around LED bulbs is a big problem today, and it was even a problem back when "long life" compact florescent bulbs came out. The issue is that the actual LED will in fact last 1000's of hours, but the supporting electronics and heat control fail much, much sooner. Sometimes they fail sooner than an old incandescent light would have. ...


17

I think you misunderstood the instruction manual. Where it reads "LED bulbs (9-Watt, Maximum)" is in the parts list. This is not giving the fixture rating. It is saying that the included lamps will use a maximum of 9W. As the manufacturer may source the lamps from multiple vendors, this makes sense. You will need to look at the fixture to determine ...


16

There are 2 parts to tube wear & tear Starts Starting a tube requires "striking an arc" across a cold tube. These are, after all, in the arc-discharge light family. This will cause a modest amount of wear, or spallation, of material off the electrodes. (which you can see as a darkening band across one end of the tube). This is helped by using ...


14

I'd like to know where you folks are getting LED bulbs with constant current sources that can be adjusted. The bulbs I've disassembled didn't bother with such niceties. They have capacitive dropper circuits in them. They depend entirely on the line voltage and the capacitance to keep the current (somewhat) correct. Here's a bulb I tore apart last year: It ...


14

The LEDs themselves do have a long life, but their drivers to work them do not. Do not know UK rules, but most electrical boxes must be accessible, no plaster or permanently mounted stuff in front of it. Blank solid face plates would be okay. Switches would leaved wired as they are,since three switches probably a headache to rewire right. Can use a safety ...


13

Not gonna happen. Can't take the heat. Those consumer products one calls an "LED light bulb" is a built consumer product made of components - case, heat sink, electronics and an array of LED emitters. The latter are purchasable as components by electronics supply houses such as mouser.com, with over 100,000 types listed. Every one has a data ...


12

That's a switch loop. Bog standard. Perfectly legit until recently. The white should be unswitched hot, and the white should have marking of tape, paint or heat-shrink in a hot color (but often does not.) You need to find the box that the switch loop comes from, where you will find its white connected to a black, and where there is normally also a white ...


12

Looks to be a bog-stock halogen bulb, and yes, there are LED versions. Measure the length before shopping. You'll want it in millimeters, generally. Bulb shape is T3 or R7S as best I can figure. A good reference for those I have not found, but those seem to get product results when combined with LED Bulb


11

That needs to be closed up. Use a round to rectangle box adapter. Image from amazon, no endorsement implied, it was just the first one to come up and I'm being lazy.


11

I think it's unlikely that this is possible. The environment in the oven in quite mild compared with an incandescent lamp, but LEDs, being semiconductor devices generally don't function well above about 100C. Some vendors seem to be making newer ovens with insulated or otherwise thermally isolated lamp compartments so that they can install LED lighting but ...


11

As you problably know, electricity flows in loops. It needs 2 wires/contacts/etc. to be effective. You also may know most fluorescent tubes have 2 pins per end, or 4 total. That is more than is needed for LED. There are 4 kinds: Ballast-Bypass (direct wire), single ended - this is where both of the 120V contacts are on the same end of the tube. These ...


10

The maximum power ratings are set by the design of the fixture. If it says 9W max. then you run a risk or damage or fire by exceeding that. Going from 9 to 10 W is a GREATER than 10% increase.


10

The manual is vague, but I think the trick here is what I like to call "old wattage". Back in the not-so-dark dark ages of light bulbs, everything was incandescent. Incandescent wattage was important because a light bulb with a 100 watt fillament puts out a LOT more heat than a 60 watt bulb. So if you put a higher watt bulb into many fixtures, it ...


10

That is an R7S bulb. From wikipedia: An R7S is a double ended, recessed single contact (RSC) linear halogen lamp measuring either 118 mm or 78 mm. Some less common lengths are 189 mm, 254 mm and 331 mm. These lamps have a T3 shape on an RSC/R7S base. These can also be known as J type and T type lamps. You'll also see them called T3 or J-Type halogen bulbs -...


10

My background: When I was in engineering school I worked summers at a Westinghouse light bulb plant (eventually in the engineering department). This was a very long time ago (when tungsten filaments ruled the world), before Westinghouse sold that business to Philips. One of the things we did was try to figure out why we'd get consumer returns. My dad was ...


10

You can buy key-operated wall switches. I think they tend to be called 'fish key' operated, due to the shape of the flat metal key / operating implement. I have one installed on my LED lighting in an otherwise dark and forbidding corridor. The lock is not a security level lock (though you can get these as well), it's just not possible to accidentally ...


9

And in that socket Ecnerwal mentioned... you will find that somebody replaced the receptacle, probably for aesthetic reasons or to get a USB recep... and they did not know what they were doing, and they did not notice that the "tab was broken off" on the original recep. They did not break it off on the new recep. As a result, they "shorted out&...


9

Even if you could, I wouldn't trust that the plastics, solder and semiconductors of an LED lamp wouldn't leach unfriendly chemicals out into the oven's air, and then into the food. There's a reason they tell hobbyists to not use food ovens for "re-flowing" (building or fixing) electronic circuit boards.


9

This is safe as long as the black, red-black, and white-black wires between the switch boxes are all in a single conduit or cable. That is, the switched-hot and the two travelers must be physically adjacent outside a junction box. Same is true for the neutral and hot from the panel to the old switch box, and for the neutral and switched-hot between the old ...


8

The specifics will vary a lot depending on the particular lights. There are three components in a typical (non-CFL) fluorescent fixture: Ballast Starter Bulb Each of these can wear out, and at different times. My understanding of how these things work is that the # of cycles (on/off) will have more impact on the ballast and the starter. The amount of time ...


7

There are at least 2 types of LED tubes: Those that work with a ballast and those that are direct connected. According to code, the interior of the fixture should have a sticker indicating it was a direct connect, if so. Also, I seriously doubt your LED tubes is using 115 watts...that's a lot for an LED...are you sure you don't mean volts? There's no way a ...


7

You could attach blocking to the joists on both sides of the existing electrical box and bracing, etc. By attaching the blocking vertically, you will maximize the weight capacity, but by attaching horizontally you can provide a larger area to "hit" with the mounting hardware. Both orientations should support the weight adequately. Sections of 2x4 ...


7

You can't - without some active component or spare poles on the switches. If you have spare poles on your switches, simply connect all three switches in parallel and to the 4. light. If you don't, you'll have to either change switches, or install a relay in parallel with each of the three light bulbs, and connect the output of those relays in parallel to ...


7

It is just a guess, but something held vertically from the top and still be straight, doe not need to be thick at all. Now take the same piece of material used horizontally and it will potentially sag between supports. Thicker material will withstand sagging over a given distance, especially over time where gravity will deflect an item that may have been ...


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