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Usually this is because one wire is supplying the power and the other wire is tied into it in order to take the power on to be used elsewhere. Another way this is accomplished is that the two wires, plus a third "a pig tail" are all tied together with a wire nut and the pig tail goes to the switch.


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I had the same problem, with the light protector broken a few millimetres from the thread so there wasn't much to grip to remove it. After trying a number of the suggestions here and elsewhere I ended up doing what I was hoping to avoid. I attacked it directly with a hammer. (Initially, I tried using a screwdriver between the hammer and glass but the glass ...


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I just had the same problem. My successful method was to warm the remaining glass and metal housing with a hairdryer, it took several goes to soften the grease etc. Then I had a small plastic tub of my granddaughters play-doh in a drawer which is around 2” diameter at the base and tapers towards the lid. By inserting that inside the broken cover, pushing up ...


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As mentioned in my comment, I would say this is caused by phantom voltage or induced voltage. This is a problem that is seem more these days because of an LEDs ability to run on very, very low power levels. What happens is that the alternating current in one wire that is running parallel and very close to another wire will induce a voltage in the wire that ...


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I agree that it is a good idea to start with the power company in this matter. Places I have seen this problem start from is higher resistance connections for the mains in the panel box, and higher resistance connections in the meter box, on the mains. Most of the time, in my limited experience, it has been the mains into the power box. You will want ...


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