31

What not to do We get people who find 4-12 non-ground wires they don't understand, and so they take them all apart. I call this "trying to learn electrical by disassembling your house". Every wire is now separated and splayed all over the box, and they ask "how does this hook up?" And we tell them Wire it exactly the way you found it And you can (...


22

To me it looks like the white plastic end plates are removable, the cover may be screwed in place below those access plates.


12

It's not a live wire at all. It's a neutral. This part of the circuit doesn't just serve the light. It also carries power (hot and neutral) onward to other loads. The always-hot is carried from wherever (switch, perhaps?) on the black wires tucked in the back there. The switched-hot is carried on the red wire, obviously you want the lamp to take its ...


10

It's a push-in connector. Basically the splice version of a "backstab". Not the best connector, to be sure. Do not cut. Firmly grasp the splice connector, then steadily tug and twist the -- -- Actually, forget that. The wires in the ceiling are already too old, short and fragile. Leave the connector alone and cut the modern, plastic black and white ...


9

DON'T try random stuff when you get stuck Trying to replace actual knowledge with "throw things at the wall and see what sticks" is a fatal error when dealing with electrical equipment. Why? The entire strategy is based on stopping when you find "the" combination that works. Actually, many combinations will work and also kill you. The only way to avoid ...


8

You have a short to ground on your light fixture circuit somewhere and the GFCI is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. In bathroom light fixtures, the culprit is usually corrosion and/or condensation build-up.


8

One of two things. Either you just installed this GFCI, and you miswired it quite badly, probably relating to removing the warning sticker on the LOAD terminals. The lights are wired to be protected from ground faults by the GFCI. The light developed a ground fault, and the GFCI detected this, and tripped to protect you, as intended. Both at once: you ...


7

Do you have a double switch on the wall? The red and black wires in a three core at a light fitting are usually intended to be separate feeds for a fan plus lighting fixture. If you look behind the switch you may find the red and black commoned together there too, if a double switch wasn't fitted. Usually the unused one is just capped off at the light ...


7

You don't use a grommet in this application but rather an appropriate clamp. The correct type depends on what you are connecting here but the usual thing for non-metallic cable is something like this: https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/7b668807-9db0-42c3-86b1-e9ec7481045c/svn/halex-conduit-fittings-20511-64_1000.jpg


6

The remote you use to turn the light on and off is not compatible with LED bulbs. One reason people love LED bulbs is because they use so little power. Unfortunately, some devices in the past used the fact that a regular light bulb can pass some current without glowing. Certain types of switches use a little bit of "parasitic" voltage running through the ...


6

JC : J From the word “Jod” – It means “Iodine” in German and indicates that it is a Halogen lamp. C From the word “Cine” Indicates that the primary application for lamp is Cinema but can include Optics & Projection & Other Markets This halogen bulb is a low voltage bulb, commonly found under counters, in desk lamps, or as accent lighting. This type ...


6

Connect all ground wires together in the light/fan combo. Ground paths often parallel, like anytime MC cable is used, a ground wire is pulled into a conduit, or a metal box is installed on a metal stud. 250.130(C) only applies in conditions of the paragraph ahead of it, where it refers to receptacle replacements and circuit extensions of existing circuits (...


5

They make a lot of different crossbars and adapters, including some that swivel. Have you tried one like these?: I recommend a good ol' local mom and pop hardware store rather than some big-box warehouse chain store.


5

No, you can't do that. It sounds great until the first time you are short a receptacle and plug in something else - perhaps a vacuum cleaner. And have big problems. Or to give a really bad scenario - your regular receptacle circuits in the kitchen are out but the lighting circuit is working so you move your refrigerator to the "oops, still dimmed" ceiling ...


5

If I buy a GU24 to E26 adapter and install a 30- or 60-watt incandescent in it: Is there a risk of fire because the fixture can't handle the heat produced by a 14+ watt light bulb? Is there still a risk if I remove the glass fixture and just screw the light bulb into the adapter? Would a 14+ watt light bulb potentially cause overheating in the ...


5

Turn the power off. Connect the middle wire to the left wire with a wire from the fixture (white if there). Then connect the right wire to the fixture. Turn on the power and check for correct operation. If there is a ground wire with your new fixture, connect it to the bare copper wires in the back of the junction box. You're not connecting a neutral to a ...


5

This cannot be a problem The connectors are listed for a wide range of solid and stranded wire. A wider range, in fact, than you are allowed to use inside fixtures, which must be no smaller than #18 for mains voltage - that's according to UL. Now, if the fixture is not UL listed (or other NRTL), don't use it. Especially if it's one of those foreign ...


5

That is a push-in connector, it has a one-way spring inside that holds the wire. I think it's a Gardner Bender Pushguard. Ideal makes In-Sure connectors that are similar, Wago makes similar connectors, and I am sure there are other brands. To get the wires out one at a time, hold the wire in place, steady light pull on the connector, and twist the ...


5

I don't think your plan to make a custom bracket will work for a number of reasons. It's way larger and heavier than necessary, it will be very hard to make a spring clamp of that size to make a pressure clamp, and it will be hard or impossible to slide it on over VHB tape. VHB tape may or may not hold up to the heat generated by the light. It's always ...


5

The middle image clearly shows a nut at the bottom of the recess or hole. Get some deep thin wall sockets and it should come undone easily. Or undo the flathead screws and make the wires safe then break the base. Then remove or grind down the threads...


4

The switch likely has nothing to do with it. Sounds like you need a new ballast. Or in the era of efficient LEDs, possibly a new fixture, if you care to upgrade. I used to have a dying fluorescent fixture that was highly humidity sensitive - it would start reasonably on dry days, and take minutes or hours on wet days. There's an LED there now ;^) More ...


4

I suggest that you don't have the right to interfere with communal wiring and lighting, one because it is not part of your property (leased, rented or owned) and two, because you may not have the qualifications or insurance coverage to do that work. However, If you want a light for your door controlled by a motion detector then there are LED lights with ...


4

Welcome to the world of recessed lighting. I've run into this a few times and have used common springs. You have to shape the ends to fit into the can. Rubber bands and elastic string won't stand up to the heat long term. Instead, exact replacements are available online at $1.18 for two. Since you're installing 40 trims and need two "springs" per trim, ...


4

What you need is a ceiling medallion. That's a fancy name for "a circular thing you stick on the ceiling to look nice and cover a hole". A lot of them are designed to actually have a lamp hang from them, but there are some with a big hole in the middle which is exactly what you need here. There are simple ones: and fancier ones: Some are white or metallic ...


4

First of all, you cannot be sure that the stem is connected to the neutral wire and not to the live one unless you test it with a testing screwdriver, since alternating current is bidirectional. Even if we consider it to be the neutral one you cannot trust that it is safe to touch. In ideal circumstances, where the neutral wire is very well grounded, it ...


4

Yes. You understand to never parallel neutrals. Paralleling grounds is fine. Go ahead and attach them all; the more the merrier!


4

Fortunately the housing is clear so you can see the workings inside. It contains a springy "tooth" that grabs any wire pushed alongside it. There should be a small slot or round hole nearby for a small pointed tool to release the tooth while you tug on the wire. It works much like the quick-connects on the back of receptacles and switches. Normally they are ...


4

You're going to need a deep socket or maybe a needle nosed pliers.


4

Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


3

Looks a little like a bullet connector / terminal. If you have access to the other end of the connector that you think is broken, you could disconnect it & test the wire to see if it's really broken using a multimeter (set to ohms / resistance), or test it in place with the power off. Maybe that wire's not the problem, there are a lot of other ...


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