Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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What not to do We get people who find 4-12 non-ground wires they don't understand, and so they take them all apart. I call this "trying to learn electrical by disassembling your house". Every wire is now separated and splayed all over the box, and they ask "how does this hook up?" And we tell them Wire it exactly the way you found it And you can (...


11

It's not a live wire at all. It's a neutral. This part of the circuit doesn't just serve the light. It also carries power (hot and neutral) onward to other loads. The always-hot is carried from wherever (switch, perhaps?) on the black wires tucked in the back there. The switched-hot is carried on the red wire, obviously you want the lamp to take its ...


9

DON'T try random stuff when you get stuck Trying to replace actual knowledge with "throw things at the wall and see what sticks" is a fatal error when dealing with electrical equipment. Why? The entire strategy is based on stopping when you find "the" combination that works. Actually, many combinations will work and also kill you. The only way to avoid ...


8

You have a short to ground on your light fixture circuit somewhere and the GFCI is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. In bathroom light fixtures, the culprit is usually corrosion and/or condensation build-up.


8

One of two things. Either you just installed this GFCI, and you miswired it quite badly, probably relating to removing the warning sticker on the LOAD terminals. The lights are wired to be protected from ground faults by the GFCI. The light developed a ground fault, and the GFCI detected this, and tripped to protect you, as intended. Both at once: you ...


7

Do you have a double switch on the wall? The red and black wires in a three core at a light fitting are usually intended to be separate feeds for a fan plus lighting fixture. If you look behind the switch you may find the red and black commoned together there too, if a double switch wasn't fitted. Usually the unused one is just capped off at the light ...


7

You don't use a grommet in this application but rather an appropriate clamp. The correct type depends on what you are connecting here but the usual thing for non-metallic cable is something like this: https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/7b668807-9db0-42c3-86b1-e9ec7481045c/svn/halex-conduit-fittings-20511-64_1000.jpg


6

The best explanation I can think of is that many compact fluorescent(CFL) and LED bulbs are not compatible with dimmers. The reason why is non-dimmable CFLs cannot and should not ever be used with dimmer switches. and To put it in layman's terms, most modern dimmer switches essentially function the same way as if you were to turn a light on and off ...


6

The remote you use to turn the light on and off is not compatible with LED bulbs. One reason people love LED bulbs is because they use so little power. Unfortunately, some devices in the past used the fact that a regular light bulb can pass some current without glowing. Certain types of switches use a little bit of "parasitic" voltage running through the ...


6

JC : J From the word “Jod” – It means “Iodine” in German and indicates that it is a Halogen lamp. C From the word “Cine” Indicates that the primary application for lamp is Cinema but can include Optics & Projection & Other Markets This halogen bulb is a low voltage bulb, commonly found under counters, in desk lamps, or as accent lighting. This type ...


5

They make a lot of different crossbars and adapters, including some that swivel. Have you tried one like these?: I recommend a good ol' local mom and pop hardware store rather than some big-box warehouse chain store.


5

No, you can't do that. It sounds great until the first time you are short a receptacle and plug in something else - perhaps a vacuum cleaner. And have big problems. Or to give a really bad scenario - your regular receptacle circuits in the kitchen are out but the lighting circuit is working so you move your refrigerator to the "oops, still dimmed" ceiling ...


5

If I buy a GU24 to E26 adapter and install a 30- or 60-watt incandescent in it: Is there a risk of fire because the fixture can't handle the heat produced by a 14+ watt light bulb? Is there still a risk if I remove the glass fixture and just screw the light bulb into the adapter? Would a 14+ watt light bulb potentially cause overheating in the ...


5

Turn the power off. Connect the middle wire to the left wire with a wire from the fixture (white if there). Then connect the right wire to the fixture. Turn on the power and check for correct operation. If there is a ground wire with your new fixture, connect it to the bare copper wires in the back of the junction box. You're not connecting a neutral to a ...


5

This cannot be a problem The connectors are listed for a wide range of solid and stranded wire. A wider range, in fact, than you are allowed to use inside fixtures, which must be no smaller than #18 for mains voltage - that's according to UL. Now, if the fixture is not UL listed (or other NRTL), don't use it. Especially if it's one of those foreign ...


4

See that dimple in the third photo? I' guessing that there are three or four of them. They engage with slots in the other half of the housing. Rotate the lower portion counter-clockwise roughly as far as the dimple is long and it should come down. You may have to align the screws on top with their slots as well. Loosen the set screw to avoid scratches.


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You need a box in that location , an "old work" box can be placed into the hole and it will provide the mounts for the fixture. Old work boxes have tabs or wings that anchor to the back side of the wall.


4

The switch likely has nothing to do with it. Sounds like you need a new ballast. Or in the era of efficient LEDs, possibly a new fixture, if you care to upgrade. I used to have a dying fluorescent fixture that was highly humidity sensitive - it would start reasonably on dry days, and take minutes or hours on wet days. There's an LED there now ;^) More ...


4

I suggest that you don't have the right to interfere with communal wiring and lighting, one because it is not part of your property (leased, rented or owned) and two, because you may not have the qualifications or insurance coverage to do that work. However, If you want a light for your door controlled by a motion detector then there are LED lights with ...


4

Welcome to the world of recessed lighting. I've run into this a few times and have used common springs. You have to shape the ends to fit into the can. Rubber bands and elastic string won't stand up to the heat long term. Instead, exact replacements are available online at $1.18 for two. Since you're installing 40 trims and need two "springs" per trim, ...


4

What you need is a ceiling medallion. That's a fancy name for "a circular thing you stick on the ceiling to look nice and cover a hole". A lot of them are designed to actually have a lamp hang from them, but there are some with a big hole in the middle which is exactly what you need here. There are simple ones: and fancier ones: Some are white or metallic ...


4

First of all, you cannot be sure that the stem is connected to the neutral wire and not to the live one unless you test it with a testing screwdriver, since alternating current is bidirectional. Even if we consider it to be the neutral one you cannot trust that it is safe to touch. In ideal circumstances, where the neutral wire is very well grounded, it ...


3

Ain't no 60V around here... If the instructions actually say 60V then throw the whole thing away. Seriously. I don't know any place on a 60V system, and you mentioned 120V (normal for USA/Canada/etc.) anyway. So if it really says 60V then that is a sign of extremely poor quality and I would not trust the actual parts that matter to be any good. If it ...


3

Virtually all light fixtures are meant to be installed over an electrical box. Trying to remote the light fixture from an existing electrical box implies that you are intending to snake a mains power cable from the electrical box over to the light. To do this properly and in the safest manner possible you need to add an additional electrical box at the ...


3

I would only trust a toggle bolt type anchor in a ceiling or overhead application, even if the manufacturer's information shows an auger or plastic expansion type anchor is strong enough. With augers or plastic anchors, if the hole is just a little sloppy, the holding power is dramatically reduced. The table below shows that even the smallest toggle in ...


3

I have one but have to turn it off while actually cooking because it blows heat away from open pans and is enough to change the way food cooks. I think a vertical exhaust fan through a window or over the stove would work better for removing heat and smoke/odors from cooking on the stove top.


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What you have -- ? Note that colors signify function, even though the actual cable color is whatever standard cable colors are. Here, red is switched-hot, white is neutral. You can't cross the streams - er, send current going in a loop. This is AC. It'll do bad things. A basic rule is that currents must be equal in each cable or conduit. Think ...


3

Looks a little like a bullet connector / terminal. If you have access to the other end of the connector that you think is broken, you could disconnect it & test the wire to see if it's really broken using a multimeter (set to ohms / resistance), or test it in place with the power off. Maybe that wire's not the problem, there are a lot of other ...


3

I believe that an "offset mounting plate" might work for you (click for larger): Sample swivel offset crossbar In this type of plate, the front and rear elements are offset from one another so you can have the box mounting screws and the studs for the fixture practically on top of each other. The box does look slightly recessed into the wall which could ...


3

For interior recessed lighting, I don't think I've ever seen a can that wasn't rated for 60W or higher. You can remove the bulb and the trim and look at the inside of the can for a sticker that lists the bulb wattage. They normally do have labels. That said, you have two options to update these. You can get LED bulbs that are shaped like a standard light ...


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