7

A picture of the situation would be immensely helpful. Anyways, if the ceiling is not finished then I would upgrade to standard sized electrical boxes; it would cost a grand total of about $3 for the box, outlet, and plate. If that is not possible then get an oversized cover and drill the holes yourself. See this Amazon review Source: https://www.amazon....


7

What you want is available if you are willing to order parts and put it together. The starting place is a single round outlet such as the Leviton 5258-SS. Picture Source Then you need the smaller sized 3.5" cover plate with 2.75" mounting holes. The above outlet mounts into the plate. Picture Source See picture sources for possible suppliers. To mount ...


5

Indirect lighting. example here Usually the light source is hidden by an archtectural feature, so the feature is constructed by normal building means and then the light source is hidden in it. At my house we have one strip light hidden in an open topped curtain pelmet and another hidden behind an one of the exposed rafters. These are 5' flourescent tubes ...


5

You can install one of these light sockets.


2

Your plan ain't gonna happen. There's no way to do that. I realize from your perspective it seems obvious that somebody ought to make "kit" for that, but they don't. Nobody installs junction boxes sideways like that. Since you won't turn the box, you are married to this sideways arrangement. That's OK, it may still work out. Your particular line of ...


2

Okay, so you're keen on UV bulbs but don't really have any background in lighting tech. That's fine. E17 is a type of Edison screw-in base used with incandescent bulbs (and LED conversions). It is the third most popular after E27 (standard lightbulb) and E10 (Candelabra). Many fixtures will apply effectively 120V to an E17 Edison base. However, the E17 ...


2

The "how to" is you send that rubbish back to the dark place. It is not safe nor legal, and doesn't even fit our wiring. You bought it in a way that circumvented the systems that assure quality, safe products in the consumer retail stream. Don't do that with electrical gear. Then you buy any of a wide variety of products which do that same function, ...


2

It's pretty straightforward. These lights require a junction box, but they provide it. The junction box includes the driver for the LEDs. The spur cable going from the "j-box" to the LED itself is low voltage DC. You can see the j-box on the right here, and there's a closeup showing the color temperature switch. The "j-box" and LED head are mates; ...


2

That is correct. They contain both cool white and warm white elements, and they dim/blend between them. You only really need two color temps - 2700k and 5500k - to cover the gamut with dimming/blending.


2

You will not be wiring the two light fixtures in series. In fact you will be wiring them up in parallel from a single power feed. Since the power feed is always on make sure to have the breaker off before attempting to do any connections. The pull chains on each light assembly will allow independent control of each light.


1

The “CE” stamped on the unit is a symbol used in Europe noting that its “Conformity European”. https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/question135.htm It’s a certification in order for it to be sold throughout Europe. Yes, you’ll need an adapter. If you’ve ever been to europe , you know you need an adapter to use your shaver, phone charger, etc....


1

That mark actually means "Chinese Excrement". You think I'm kidding. Overseas makers of the cheap & shoddy are regularly forging quality marks. Far and away their favorite is the CE mark; they either mess up the mark accidentally-on-purpose, or render it correctly but put it on total junk. A proper CE mark is only applicable to bricks-and-mortar ...


1

Take the two black wires in the box and wire nut them together. Take the two white wires from the box and twist them together and then connect them to the two white wires from the fixture with a wire nut. Take the red wire in the box and connect it to the two black wires from the fixture with a wire nut. Connect the ground wires together. Turn off the power ...


1

If there's no mudring, or you don't want to rotate it, add an outlet, assuming you have a hot and neutral. Use a switch and receptacle for one slot and a double switch for the other. These can be mounted sideways so you keep your up/down orientation for the switches.


1

First that wiring is very old it looks like Fabric-Insulated Electrical Wire which was used in the 50's and 60's and it really should be replaced as the insulation may not be protecting the wires which could be the reason the lights are not working. The top switch your referring to is wired as a two way switch the middle wire will be the Common which, if it ...


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