6

Connect all ground wires together in the light/fan combo. Ground paths often parallel, like anytime MC cable is used, a ground wire is pulled into a conduit, or a metal box is installed on a metal stud. 250.130(C) only applies in conditions of the paragraph ahead of it, where it refers to receptacle replacements and circuit extensions of existing circuits (...


6

JC : J From the word “Jod” – It means “Iodine” in German and indicates that it is a Halogen lamp. C From the word “Cine” Indicates that the primary application for lamp is Cinema but can include Optics & Projection & Other Markets This halogen bulb is a low voltage bulb, commonly found under counters, in desk lamps, or as accent lighting. This type ...


4

Yes. You understand to never parallel neutrals. Paralleling grounds is fine. Go ahead and attach them all; the more the merrier!


3

The white wire tucked into the back of the box, that isn't stripped or capped, is your actual neutral. We know that "White 1" is not neutral, because it is spliced to a black wire, and a black wire can only be a hot wire (remarking hot-colored wires to change their purpose is forbidden). Therefore "White 1" is certainly a hot wire, and should have been ...


2

Remove the four drywall screws in the existing bracket and remove it. Then see about removing the pipe, it might just be part of the bracket. If there is an electrical box up there you can mount the led fixture. If not, you'll have to install one. Was the fan controlled by a wall switch or a pull chain?


2

It may be a piece of rebar, usually plumbing and wiring in a multistory building will be in a electrical / plumbing chase, not in the “floor / ceiling”. No recovery needed, I would get a shorter concrete screw it looks like you have a fairly deep hole. Those led panels are not much of a load and you should have at least 2 screws if not 4 so cut that screw ...


2

The installation instructions seem pretty clear. You should remove the three screws around the perimeter and then you may have to twist the shade portion to pull it down. The bump visible next to the screw could be an indentation that holds on to a notch in the shade that requires it to be twisted before it comes off. Maybe you just need to use a little ...


2

You need to adjust the screws so they protrude from the front of the bracket just enough to secure the fixture to the wall with the included cap nuts. Then cut off the part with the screw heads, flush with the back of the bracket. Good luck. Many wire cutters/strippers have the ability to cut this size bolt and protect the threads.


2

This is definitely cheap Chinese. The UL listing appears to be faked. Feel free to buy the lamp for its aesthetic elements, but buy a boring old UL listed lamp for the actual light part.


2

Reconnecting the light is just white-to-white and black-to-black. That's pretty simple, but it never hurts to double check. As for the second question, it does look like the pull chain switch is riveted to the lamp socket. Those types of fixtures are cheap these days ($15 for fixture, $5 for just the switch), so you should just replace the whole fixture. ...


2

Smart Switches to the Rescue You might be able to use the existing wiring for 4-way switches. But a simpler solution, and one that does not require any new wiring (just reconfiguration of the existing wires and new switches) is smart switches. There are many brands and many different types. You will need to do your research carefully as there are different ...


1

If I follow your hoping to salvage the sockets out of this string and use them for a custom made string of lights. Since these sockets go for about $2 or so, you'll save something like $100. I think it's a good idea as long as you make this a low voltage string of lights. I don't think 120V homebrew stuff is a great idea for a lot of reasons. But say ...


1

Just chiming in here because I had this problem too and this was one of the only threads that I could find that discussed the issue. My problem was definitely the housing can shifting upwards and I was pushing the light into place. All I did was take two strips of electrical tape, stuck one end to the interior of the housing and ran it vertically down ...


1

The E14 base is European, as is the 110 voltage. Yes and No. E14 is typically European. But European voltage is typically 230. 110 is actually more of a US number. So right away that raises questions. In addition, it does not say the typical UL Listed. Instead it says UL Certified. Which is potentially OK, but another question to consider - as in: Is that ...


1

Candelabra is a type of lamp base (the screwey thing at the bottom). It is the second most common after Edison E27. They are widely supported and are readily available in LED at prices comparable to E27 (unlike less common sizes, where they come at a premium). You shouldn't have any trouble finding such bulbs at places that sell Harbor Breeze fans. If ...


1

I don't have enough reputation points to comment under where you replied to Harper that the left white wire is hot or not (switched). You've got a switch loop wired there. Basically, the power comes to the fixture first rather than the switch. As a result, your black switch wire is bundled with the other hots and carries power down to one leg of the ...


1

OK, after turning off the breaker, take the two white wires on the right, with the orange and the yellow wire nuts, and twist them together. Turn the power back on and check the other rooms for power. If they have it, get your voltage meter and check between the ones you just twisted together and the white wire with the tape coming from the switch. If you ...


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