5

Medium base E26 (1") Lampholders are normally rated for 250v and can be wired for US 240v bulbs with two hot conductors, so screw color for polarization is inappropriate. However, NEC 410.50 specifies that when a "grounded conductor" (which is the name the NEC normally uses for the neutral) is connected to a luminaire, it shall be connected to ...


3

The red wire is certainly the supply (always-hot), and the yellow wire is certainly the switched-hot. The red wire is a continuous wire that is hooked like a "U" over the screw. Don't cut it -- simply do the same thing on the new switch. This may take some fidgeting. Unscrew the screws all the way to the soft stop - do not force them farther ...


3

The bulb was replaced ( same exact brand ). Try something different. I have a handful of the early LED models that have lasted many years, the ones with the heavy heat syncs on them, and some outdoor flood lights that are on nightly. They aren't as bright as when I first got them, but they still work well. The things they sell now, whether Great Value, or ...


2

Probably just playing it safe. The issue is almost certainly preventing fire from overheating. The catch is there are two types of overheating: Total Heat This is, essentially, Watts in, BTUs out. Some power comes out as light, but for practical purposes you can just look at the total Watts. 60 is obviously a lot more than 9.5 - with respect to total heat, ...


1

Your diagram does not use standard switch symbols so it is impossible to determine where the common pole (C) is and the normally open (NO) and normally closed (NC) contacts are. Figure 1. You can see in Figure 1b that switching SW4 will short-circuit the live and neutral. If you can redraw your circuit we may be able to help further.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible