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30

What not to do We get people who find 4-12 non-ground wires they don't understand, and so they take them all apart. I call this "trying to learn electrical by disassembling your house". Every wire is now separated and splayed all over the box, and they ask "how does this hook up?" And we tell them Wire it exactly the way you found it And you can (...


23

I'm not sure how much room you have to work in, but an option would be to rent a 16 foot step ladder at your local tool rental center. If the bulbs are pointed down, maybe some type of bulb grabber on an extension pole. Got a pic of the fixture?


20

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


18

I had a very similar light, and the key was this: Any upward pressure exerted from grabbing the glass created friction that made it not turn. You want to touch as lightly as you can, near the edges, and try to apply rotational energy only, with no pushing up. Unfortunately, that is roughly impossible to do if you're reaching so high that you need to ...


16

It looks like an inline switch to me, which is usually indicated by a mark on the wire. Are there any black markings (Eg sharpie or electrical tape) on the white wire? You should be able to wire in your fixture to the old wires exactly as is.


14

If you are uncomfortable with working at heights you can hire someone to change the lights (and clean the fan). Think about installing LED light bulbs. You may never need to change them again.


13

The power (from the breaker) is likely at the light fixture. When you hook black to black and white to white, the light is powered directly from the breaker. In this configuration, when you flip the switch on you create a short through the switch. What you need to do is hook it up like this. Notice the white wire that runs between the switch and the light ...


12

Pick up a small bucket of an all purpose patch likeDap Flexall All Purpose Filler. The all purpose stuff is a little thicker than typical joint compound, so it makes filling a bit easier. Remove the switch cover. Using a taping knife, fill in the holes by pushing the compound into the hole and drawing the knife away from the hole. Like so... Repeat for ...


12

It looks like you've ruined it. The stranded wires (such as the black one visible in the picture) are usually permanently attached to the lamp (Inside those cloth tubes). The solid wires are your household wiring. Normally you'd attach the stranded black to the solid black with a wire nut, and the same with the whites. Then attach the bare copper ground (...


11

Use a NCVT (non-contact voltage tester) and see which of the two wires alarms when the switch is on. That will be your black/hot wire. If both of the wires alarm, stop, do not pass go, something else is wrong. For the ground, you don't have one. The safest thing to do is run a whole new wire back to the panel. Anything else is "less than safest".


11

One reason bulbs can burn out quickly is if the voltage applied to them is higher than the expected voltage (120V in The USA). Wiring problems and bad transformers can cause the voltage to be out of spec. Another reason is if there is a loose connection somewhere, and the light flickers (causing unnecessary heating/cooling cycles). A third reason is if the ...


11

I have the same one...the definitive answer is as Grant says. One of the clips pulls out enough to remove glass! No screws or screwdrivers needed.


11

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


11

It's not a live wire at all. It's a neutral. This part of the circuit doesn't just serve the light. It also carries power (hot and neutral) onward to other loads. The always-hot is carried from wherever (switch, perhaps?) on the black wires tucked in the back there. The switched-hot is carried on the red wire, obviously you want the lamp to take its ...


10

A small scaffolding tower might be your best option. This will give you the height and safety you need. Something like this one. While it might be a bit expensive for just changing light bulbs you'll need it when you come to paint the ceiling in this room.


10

The instructions for the fixture are only correct for a metal box. If a metal box was used, the box itself would (should) be grounded. The bracket that holds the light would then be connected to the box, which would make the bracket grounded. Finally the ground wire from the fixture would attach to the bracket, grounding the fixture. In the case of a ...


10

I am a Fire Marshall. No, it is not safe. Lint, dust, a moth, or flying bug could cause a spark/fire. Better to leave a bulb in the socket, or insert a plug adapter than to leave the socket open.


10

Specifically that is a 78mm T3 halogen lamp. I have one in my bathroom as well and love it because: The bulbs are pretty cheap. Usually a couple dollars. I bought 10 on ebay for $20. They are BRIGHT. Much brighter than LED bulbs, and some fixtures can take 200 or 250W bulbs. For a light over a mirror thats only on a few minutes a day, I dont care about ...


10

You don't need a bulb at all to test the fixture. There should be one main "neutral", and one main "hot" wire coming out of the fixture. If there's more than one of each, you can tie each set all together, or test each one individually. The following procedure assumes a single "hot", and single "neutral". First, set the multimeter to test continuity , or ...


10

I can't disagree with Paul's response especially when it comes to safety. There are certainly a few things that can be considered here and if you are uncertain I would recommend an electrician because what you describe should never be able to happen and now that is has been identified correcting it is crucial. Given that you can measure near 120, but it is ...


9

Does your ceiling fan wobble? Shaking a light bulb can break the filament. See How do I balance a ceiling fan? Is your line voltage reliable? An electrician told me once that he swears by 130V-rated bulbs. If voltage surges a little, the 130V bulb will tolerate it better than lower-rated bulbs. The rating is printed on the top of the bulb. However, if this ...


9

It is generally not acceptable to have wire junctions be inaccessible. The rule of thumb is: All junctions must be in a box, but that box must be accessible - you cannot legally close a box up behind drywall. There are some limited exceptions, as noted here. You should run a new line if you don't have the slack.


9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


9

The first problem you need to address is the state of the insulation on the existing wiring. It appears that there is little, if any insulation on the wire on the right as it enters the existing old school pancake box. That is an invitation to a short that risks blowing fuses/popping breakers (at best) and electrocution or conflagration (at worst). Can't ...


9

The shroud around the bulb should just pull down and out a few inches before the tension wires lock. If it seems really solid then someone probably painted then replaced before drying and glued it there with the paint. Try using a flat scraper or 5in1 between ceiling and ring.


9

DON'T try random stuff when you get stuck Trying to replace actual knowledge with "throw things at the wall and see what sticks" is a fatal error when dealing with electrical equipment. Why? The entire strategy is based on stopping when you find "the" combination that works. Actually, many combinations will work and also kill you. The only way to avoid ...


8

You can use something like this Wall Repair Patch to give some support to the new plaster. Cut out a square in the patch to match the size of the junction box and then put the patch in place (with the face plate off). Then apply joint compound to those gaps; the patch will give the joint compound some support. Finally when everything is dry then put the ...


8

I would not recommend gluing it. If it comes off (wind, animal), it is going to likely pull the stucco off with it in which case you have a big problem and possibly costly repair. I would just use the screws since it is easier to fill two small holes then fix a large patch of stucco. Make sure to use screws long enough to penetrate the solid material ...


8

First, make sure the fixture is switched off. Using a small piece of cloth, to protect your fingers in case the bulb breaks, grab the bulb firmly near the base, and rock it slightly back and forth (left to right), so that you are alternately pulling on one pin, then the other. Once the pins start to move you will probably be able to pull it straight out. ...


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