42

You could install a circular ceiling medallion over the hole and run the light fixture through the middle of it. This would avoid having to match the paint of the surrounding ceiling. Or here's an even simpler, 10", white trim piece.


31

What not to do We get people who find 4-12 non-ground wires they don't understand, and so they take them all apart. I call this "trying to learn electrical by disassembling your house". Every wire is now separated and splayed all over the box, and they ask "how does this hook up?" And we tell them Wire it exactly the way you found it And you can (...


29

There are two completely different thermal objectives First, don't set other stuff on fire. That's decided by the thermal insulation of the fixture (think: thick insulation in down lights) and limits the size (in actual wattage) of any bulb, but it's mainly aimed at incandescents. Incandescent bulbs love hot places and work better there. A fixture succeeds ...


26

This is a good question - seeing some insulation in your light fixture can be a bit of a shock. Think about it, though. Those incandescent bulbs are inside a glass globe. One of the best features of an incandescent bulb is its ability to turn electricity into heat. What's that heat going to do when it's trapped inside the globe - it's going to melt the ...


22

To me it looks like the white plastic end plates are removable, the cover may be screwed in place below those access plates.


20

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


17

I think you misunderstood the instruction manual. Where it reads "LED bulbs (9-Watt, Maximum)" is in the parts list. This is not giving the fixture rating. It is saying that the included lamps will use a maximum of 9W. As the manufacturer may source the lamps from multiple vendors, this makes sense. You will need to look at the fixture to determine ...


16

It looks like an inline switch to me, which is usually indicated by a mark on the wire. Are there any black markings (Eg sharpie or electrical tape) on the white wire? You should be able to wire in your fixture to the old wires exactly as is.


16

Like any other repair to sheetrock/plasterboard/drywall. Turn power off (the breaker, not the switch) to the fixture and drop the trim out of your way. Either cut out a larger area and make a large patch, or add some wood strips behind and fit a small patch, then fill the joints (force joint compound into them with a small drywall knife), tape, and mud (...


16

That’s a standard weatherproof (Bell) box, and yes, sometimes they do accumulate and hold water as you have found. Code not only allows boxes to be drained. Code requires boxes to be arranged to drain; according to 314.15, a 1/8” hole is allowed. I have found conduit bodies and boxes at a low point (at the bottom of a hill or conveyor) to fill from the ...


15

An Edison bulb has a metal "tip" that is totally inaccessible once you start screwing it in. It does not make contact with the socket until it's screwed all the way in. It also has an outer metal threaded screw base, which is easily touched while screwing it in. It makes contact with the sockets "shell" immediately and continuously ...


13

I have the same one...the definitive answer is as Grant says. One of the clips pulls out enough to remove glass! No screws or screwdrivers needed.


13

To figure out the order of items on a circuit: (warning, tedious and laborious, but accurate) First, sort out which items are on the circuit - i.e. what turns off/on with the breaker. Turn the breaker off. Pick any device on the circuit, open it up. If there's only one cable coming into the box, close it up again, noting that it's an end. If there are two or ...


12

I can't disagree with Paul's response especially when it comes to safety. There are certainly a few things that can be considered here and if you are uncertain I would recommend an electrician because what you describe should never be able to happen and now that is has been identified correcting it is crucial. Given that you can measure near 120, but it is ...


12

It's not a live wire at all. It's a neutral. This part of the circuit doesn't just serve the light. It also carries power (hot and neutral) onward to other loads. The always-hot is carried from wherever (switch, perhaps?) on the black wires tucked in the back there. The switched-hot is carried on the red wire, obviously you want the lamp to take its ...


12

You put the switch and the light fixture both between hot & neutral, effectively parallel to each other. That makes the light always on and the switch creates a short between hot & neutral - correctly tripping the breaker. What you have is a switch loop. They are confusing at first but actually quite simple. Light switches are normally wired in the &...


12

These don't get "removed", they get cut off. Snip the copper solid wire at the end of those connectors, strip off the insulation and then use wire nuts or some other approved connector to connect the wires for your new light.


11

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


11

You don't need a bulb at all to test the fixture. There should be one main "neutral", and one main "hot" wire coming out of the fixture. If there's more than one of each, you can tie each set all together, or test each one individually. The following procedure assumes a single "hot", and single "neutral". First, set the multimeter to test continuity , or ...


11

That needs to be closed up. Use a round to rectangle box adapter. Image from amazon, no endorsement implied, it was just the first one to come up and I'm being lazy.


11

OK, I'm sure it's clear to you that the white should be connected to the white, and it should be the neutral. But just switching the wires really is an incomplete solution, you know they did something wrong, but how wrong? At very least you need a tester to verify that the black is the hot and it is the switched wire. This can simply be done with a no-...


10

I am a Fire Marshall. No, it is not safe. Lint, dust, a moth, or flying bug could cause a spark/fire. Better to leave a bulb in the socket, or insert a plug adapter than to leave the socket open.


10

Specifically that is a 78mm T3 halogen lamp. I have one in my bathroom as well and love it because: The bulbs are pretty cheap. Usually a couple dollars. I bought 10 on ebay for $20. They are BRIGHT. Much brighter than LED bulbs, and some fixtures can take 200 or 250W bulbs. For a light over a mirror thats only on a few minutes a day, I dont care about ...


10

It's a push-in connector. Basically the splice version of a "backstab". Not the best connector, to be sure. Do not cut. Firmly grasp the splice connector, then steadily tug and twist the -- -- Actually, forget that. The wires in the ceiling are already too old, short and fragile. Leave the connector alone and cut the modern, plastic black and white ...


10

The maximum power ratings are set by the design of the fixture. If it says 9W max. then you run a risk or damage or fire by exceeding that. Going from 9 to 10 W is a GREATER than 10% increase.


10

The manual is vague, but I think the trick here is what I like to call "old wattage". Back in the not-so-dark dark ages of light bulbs, everything was incandescent. Incandescent wattage was important because a light bulb with a 100 watt fillament puts out a LOT more heat than a 60 watt bulb. So if you put a higher watt bulb into many fixtures, it ...


9

It is generally not acceptable to have wire junctions be inaccessible. The rule of thumb is: All junctions must be in a box, but that box must be accessible - you cannot legally close a box up behind drywall. There are some limited exceptions, as noted here. You should run a new line if you don't have the slack.


9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


9

It's not the wiring. It's the LEDs themselves. LEDs have a characteristic delay when turning them on which may be more than you're used to from a lifetime of incandescent bulbs. Swap the LEDs from one position to another, and the problem should move with the bulb. Replace the LED with the equivalent incandescent (temporarily) and it should go away ...


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


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