13

This slab is small enough that you should be able to easily lift it out and repair the base soil. Unless the concrete was weak initially or in otherwise poor condition it won't break. From the lawn side, trench along the slab about 6" wide and to the bottom of the concrete. Save the sod by wrapping it in a tarp. Using heavy steel or wood bars and some ...


7

That's actually the way one normally does such things, and has been since before there were lasers, other than one normally uses a rod rather than a tape for more consistent results. You establish a reference plane (Generally not going to any great lengths to try and get it super-close to the surface you are working), measure in a grid, and mark high spots ...


7

A good ol' scrap block of two-by does nicely. Just set your laser 1-1/2" above your slab height and kick the block around as you work. This doesn't work for ceilings, of course, but hopefully you have fewer points to measure in that case. You'd have to use something with a suction cup or magnet otherwise.


4

It turns out there is no additional tile of the same size/style/color available, so this idea has been scrapped. For those who may stumble upon it in the future however, I offer the following... If we had tile to match, I could have gently removed the cut tiles, and replaced them with whole tiles, after filling the under-tile void, continuing the patterns ...


3

You might want to look around your local area for contractors that offer 'mudjacking'. Essentially they pump a grout-like mixture using a powerful hydraulic pump under the slab and bring it level. I think it generally requires cutting a hole in the slab.


3

Digging a little deeper and setting the piers on gravel seems to help them heave less, but if you go below the frost line they should be pretty solid. Digging to that depth by hand is slow work, the first foot is cake, the second foot a little slower, the third foot quite slow, the fourth foot is like digging with a table spoon. You could support the five ...


2

This is less hard than you think. Last one I did was ~10x20, and it took about 4 hours. A laser is extremely helpful for this task, though I suppose you could do it with string and a bubble stick. (It is, however, too early in the morning for me to think my way through all that, so my instructions have frikkin' laser beams.) Cross-strap the ceiling 16" OC ...


2

When faced with a similar problem I opted to cut the blue part about 4 inches away from the garage slab, break and remove the concrete, and put in a pre fabricated French drain. The cutting was done with an old skilsaw and $15 diamond blade, and busting was with hand tools. About a 1 day project.


2

I suspect Tyson is right about the old holes being from termite treatment (although they should be 1' apart for that, so it would have been a crappy, ineffective treatment job). If they were from previous jacking and the slabs now need jacking, that would kind of indicate that jacking isn't a good long-term solution (and there are lots of reports that such ...


2

One method to correct this is to jack up the sunken edge to its original height and fill the space between the slab and the ground underneath with polyurethane expanding foam. The details of the process are way beyond an answer here, but in a nutshell: You dig a trench along the sunken edge so you can get jacks under the slab then slowly, carefully jack ...


2

Are there any devices or techniques to make this less painful? Yes. I have built myself one (it took me several attempts), but it depends on how your laser works. Mine is basically a cylinder (blue) with a rotating head on top (it can also be rotated 90° but I rarely need that), with three bubble levels on the sides and screws (green) to adjust it. I place ...


2

Use a 2x2 of any suitable height. Pre-drill a hole in it (so it doesn't split), then screw in a lag screw about half its thread length. The lag screw goes down, to touch the surface being measured. Then mark a line on the 2x2 at the appropriate height so the laser hits it right on the mark. If you find your mark is not quite in the right place, turn the ...


1

If you've got money to burn (or do like I did and pick one up at a flea market for a great price), Bosch makes the GSL 2 floor laser. It shoots dual lasers specifically to level out floors. This video shows it in use and also shows it compared to the Reference level technique at the 2min mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dBgheQYjhY


1

I don't know about yours, but on mine you can turn off self-leveling. With it on, make two marks. Turn it off and then align it where you want it, equidistant from the two marks. This takes some trial and error. Use a tripod. Adjust where the laser is thrown by moving the feet ever so slightly.


1

I have the identical problem. It wouldn't be practical to try and alter the slope. You'd need a significant quantity of material, it would need to be expertly applied, and it will have a tendency to pop loose over time. I plan on cutting in several trough drains in strategic locations. They'll be something like this: I'll rent a concrete saw, make the ...


1

A notched trowel bed of thin-set under cement-board, maybe 2-layers, will get you solid, waterproof and level while still getting the new tiles flush. You can either chisel out that front edge or semi-scribe the cement-board to it and just dump in thin-set to level. I'd agree with your tile fix. Whatever the new vanity or pedestal doesn't cover should have ...


1

Yes, you can remove the blocking. Blocking is NOT structural. Blocking is only used to keep structural members plumb so they don’t lay over to one side when “fully” loaded. Actually, blocking is not required until the structural member gets to a ratio of 6:1 (i.e.: 2x12, etc.) (See IRC R502.7.1)


1

I would want to keep the shed as low as possible so you don't have a tall step up into it. Instead of pressure treated 4x4s I would consider composite lumber, which you can reasonably expect to last as long as the shed. It's more expensive of course, but you only need three pieces. I would pull drylines at level and measure every 16 inches between the line ...


1

It's really all about water, and what will happen in the future. Just leaving the blocks on the patio you'll have in short order debris against each 4x4, which over time will rot out even pressure treated. I'd put down 1x concrete pavers to make some space, then the wood block/shingle to level it out.


1

An eyeball down the string will tell the story, but a proper dryline (not kite string or other weak line) sufficiently taut (as you describe) is not going to have more than 1/4" sag in 30 feet. I'd think that would be suitable for a planter, and you could anticipate the sag when you set your heights and adjust slightly.


1

Option 1: As cutrightjm mentioned you could use a cheaper cement below the self-leveling cement. This might be the slimmest option, but I personally won't trust multiple thin layers of concrete not to crack and breakup due to their differences in thermal expansion. If you choose this route, do your homework on the expansion properties vs your existing ...


1

If you’re working in the “Right-of-Way” you’d better contact the City and verify compliance with their Standards for Construction”. The notion that the sidewalk needs to comply with ADA is nonsense, if you’re located on a 30 degree slope. First, ADA is for public “use” building sites, and second it’s not required for extreme sloped sites that create a ...


1

Leveling compound really is the way to go with this job, are there any tricks to save money on doing it - I am sure there might be. But it is always cheaper to do it right the first time than to do it right the second time. This is the area where most people make the mistakes : COSTS. To do something right costs this much and they don't want to spend the ...


1

Use a large hand plane like this: I installed vinyl plank throughout my first floor; 1200 square feet. The rooms I did before thinking about this show every little bump or seam. Most people don't see the defects, but I sure do. They drive me nuts. I wish I thought of this sooner. Make sure the blade is set to take tiny ribbons of wood and is real sharp....


1

7mm (~0.28 in) is quite a bit of crowning, more than can be absorbed by the thinset bed you'll set your cement board in. You'll need to level the floor before you can continue, which you already know. Dealing with crowning is tricky because you need to raise the rest of the floor to be level. You can use a self-leveling compound or similar skimcoat to ...


1

I wouldn't worry about it. Thinset will take care of it.


1

½" over 8'? Given the size of tiles you have, you should be fine. The layer of thin set should be more than enough to compensate for a variance that small. If you're still worried, try laying the tiles out such that the line at the apex lines up with the grout line.


1

A quarter inch difference over a span of five feet? meh. Fudge it. It doesn't have to be level, it has to be flat.


1

You'll need to header off the cut truss. This will transfer and redistribute the load on the cut truss to the adjacent trusses. To do this, you'll need to remove the tub because you'll need the space to work, or you can do this from the room below and cut the ceiling for access. Either way, I would still recommend moving the tub so you don't have to deal ...


1

Depending on how large of an area is sunken, you could cut up the old plywood with a circular saw. Sister boards to the joists and add cross members to the cavities to raise the area to match the surrounding floor. Follow up with plywood and then cement board before tiling and you should have a solid, fairly level floor to work with. This can all be done ...


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