16

One way to raise the floor, and possibly the most reasonable cost wise, is to install what I would call sleeper joists sitting the top of the existing subfloor and than add new subfloor covering over those. These "sleeper joists" would be installed as 2xX material on edge. This could be 2x6 planks spaced 16" apart. It may be necessary to rip the 2x6 planks ...


13

This slab is small enough that you should be able to easily lift it out and repair the base soil. Unless the concrete was weak initially or in otherwise poor condition it won't break. From the lawn side, trench along the slab about 6" wide and to the bottom of the concrete. Save the sod by wrapping it in a tarp. Using heavy steel or wood bars and some ...


7

That's actually the way one normally does such things, and has been since before there were lasers, other than one normally uses a rod rather than a tape for more consistent results. You establish a reference plane (Generally not going to any great lengths to try and get it super-close to the surface you are working), measure in a grid, and mark high spots ...


7

A good ol' scrap block of two-by does nicely. Just set your laser 1-1/2" above your slab height and kick the block around as you work. This doesn't work for ceilings, of course, but hopefully you have fewer points to measure in that case. You'd have to use something with a suction cup or magnet otherwise.


6

Rather than using "L" brackets why not set the counter top in place and get a few bundles of shims and shim up the difference? The brackets will be difficult to install exactly at the height you need whereas the shims are easy to adjust very small differences. Once everything is level, you can secure the counter top in place. Enjoy it and Good luck.


5

You can rent a power compactor which would do a much better job than a hand operated tamper.


4

It turns out there is no additional tile of the same size/style/color available, so this idea has been scrapped. For those who may stumble upon it in the future however, I offer the following... If we had tile to match, I could have gently removed the cut tiles, and replaced them with whole tiles, after filling the under-tile void, continuing the patterns ...


4

Definitely rotortill before you put in the pipes. Otherwise you run the risk of damaging pipes and sprinklers.


3

You might want to look around your local area for contractors that offer 'mudjacking'. Essentially they pump a grout-like mixture using a powerful hydraulic pump under the slab and bring it level. I think it generally requires cutting a hole in the slab.


3

I suspect Tyson is right about the old holes being from termite treatment (although they should be 1' apart for that, so it would have been a crappy, ineffective treatment job). If they were from previous jacking and the slabs now need jacking, that would kind of indicate that jacking isn't a good long-term solution (and there are lots of reports that such ...


3

Digging a little deeper and setting the piers on gravel seems to help them heave less, but if you go below the frost line they should be pretty solid. Digging to that depth by hand is slow work, the first foot is cake, the second foot a little slower, the third foot quite slow, the fourth foot is like digging with a table spoon. You could support the five ...


3

I like it and it should get rid of that trip hazard door threshold. I'd stay away from the self-leveling anything and you don't want nor should now have level anyway. As you said, you just want to bring the dips up. Self-leveling concrete/cement would destroy the porch's pitch for water to run away from the house. You just want Flat, which is not the same ...


3

I cringe when I see this type of construction. How good are you at mixing concrete? I'd be digging out that area under the bay window, compacting it, adding a few reinforcing rods into the existing foundation, a little framing and pour a 6" slab/footer. Then use your jacks to slowly raise or even over raise the window, cinderblock and morter it in and cover ...


3

The Code requires the floor joists to support 40 psf Live Load (people, furniture, etc.) plus Dead Load (permanent flooring, insulation, etc.). It appears your joists are about 24” on center (based on the size of the bricks). Therefore, your joists (rough sized) will support about 120 plf at 13’ span depending on the species and grade. If the joists are ...


3

I've seen leveling of floor joists like this done by sistering new members against the side of all the existing joists. They are installed such that the top edge of the new members are offset from the tops of the existing joists to create a new planar surface that is level and even. In such situation the highest point of the existing joints is set even ...


3

When I install a sprinkler system, I Rototill first, then trench and install the piping, etc. then backfill trenches, compact the trenches, then flatten/roll the yard in prep for hydro-seeding or sod. You'll want to be sure to compact the backfill in the trenches or the dirt will settle over time and you'll be able to see/feel the depressions where the ...


2

This is less hard than you think. Last one I did was ~10x20, and it took about 4 hours. A laser is extremely helpful for this task, though I suppose you could do it with string and a bubble stick. (It is, however, too early in the morning for me to think my way through all that, so my instructions have frikkin' laser beams.) Cross-strap the ceiling 16" OC ...


2

When faced with a similar problem I opted to cut the blue part about 4 inches away from the garage slab, break and remove the concrete, and put in a pre fabricated French drain. The cutting was done with an old skilsaw and $15 diamond blade, and busting was with hand tools. About a 1 day project.


2

Use a 2x2 of any suitable height. Pre-drill a hole in it (so it doesn't split), then screw in a lag screw about half its thread length. The lag screw goes down, to touch the surface being measured. Then mark a line on the 2x2 at the appropriate height so the laser hits it right on the mark. If you find your mark is not quite in the right place, turn the ...


2

One method to correct this is to jack up the sunken edge to its original height and fill the space between the slab and the ground underneath with polyurethane expanding foam. The details of the process are way beyond an answer here, but in a nutshell: You dig a trench along the sunken edge so you can get jacks under the slab then slowly, carefully jack ...


2

How long do you plan to keep the house? I'd just get the tiles tested and remediated. How many square feet are you thinking about? Self level isn't cheap and if you want to make your basement usable at some time in the future you probably want to do something more through. I've fixed up a number of 1920 basements that had sump pits for ground water ...


2

Are there any devices or techniques to make this less painful? Yes. I have built myself one (it took me several attempts), but it depends on how your laser works. Mine is basically a cylinder (blue) with a rotating head on top (it can also be rotated 90° but I rarely need that), with three bubble levels on the sides and screws (green) to adjust it. I place ...


2

I have horses, we put down at least 4” of crushed quarry or shale rock then use a plate compactor while watering it any low spots are filled and we get the areas quite flat then 3/4 rubber mats are put down. This usually holds up for about 5 years with even draft horses standing in the same spot (at the door with there head out) for hours a day our big boy ...


2

I think your on the right track to start by shimming under the joists along the top of the cinder-block wall. The target height for the middle of the joists is the most common high-level of the joist-ends. Then lay shims on top of the low joist-ends to bring them up to the target height. I've ripped unusable (warped) 2x4s and thin sheet materials into long ...


2

If you happen to have a double-layer subfloor, remove the top layer and build back up under the tread using material of appropriate thickness. Otherwise I would make the top tread thinner where it laps over the subfloor. You can do this a couple ways. Either use a hand planer and take multiple passes, or use a tablesaw or circular saw, shifting the fence 1/...


2

In all the stairs that I finished, which are a good number of them, I have never used a full tread at the top of set of stairs (sorry Ecnerwal...) where a landing nosing has always been used in the past by thousands of other carpenters over the centuries. In the past the landing nose was only 3 1/2" wide, but nowadays they are available 5 1/2" or 5 1/4" ...


2

At 3” I would mix up a batch with turkey grit much larger than sand but smaller than pea gravel. I have used this mix to level garages that had a similar slope to the door when making them a living space. The existing floor needs to be clean and I would do a heavy etch of muriatic acid and water. After rinsing I would put down an adhesion promoter then start ...


2

The first question is why you think "you need to compact the ground first" - even without frost as a consideration (not knowing where you live or if it freezes there) the first step in putting up such a wall is to remove the spongy/squishy topsoil and humus and get down into the mineral subsoil, which (if undisturbed) is normally stable and fairly ...


1

A notched trowel bed of thin-set under cement-board, maybe 2-layers, will get you solid, waterproof and level while still getting the new tiles flush. You can either chisel out that front edge or semi-scribe the cement-board to it and just dump in thin-set to level. I'd agree with your tile fix. Whatever the new vanity or pedestal doesn't cover should have ...


1

I have the identical problem. It wouldn't be practical to try and alter the slope. You'd need a significant quantity of material, it would need to be expertly applied, and it will have a tendency to pop loose over time. I plan on cutting in several trough drains in strategic locations. They'll be something like this: I'll rent a concrete saw, make the ...


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