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5

Your plan for using builder's string is good, but don't set the string tight. That opens you up to cumulative contact error. You'll end up with a soup bowl for a ceiling. Instead, put a spacer of a convenient thickness under the string at the outside. I've often used a scrap of 1x or 2x lumber (3/4" and 1-1/2", respectively). Then you'd measure the ...


3

Since the floor is needing to be replaced with plywood to get a good base, I would remove the rest of the existing subfloor and plane down the high spot, if it is truly high. Over time. joists will develop a sag in the middle, so where though it may be truly high in the area you suggest, it may actually be level with the rest of the floor at bearing walls. ...


3

The approach by @isherwood is correct. However, a very simple tool I've used that may make it simpler to fine-tune the plane is an 8 foot aluminum straight edge. They're inexpensive, about $25. The one I use is anodized aluminum (light), is easily broken down into four foot sections and has virtually no flex, especially if used on edge. By sliding it across ...


3

You're assuming that your floor is level; this will lead to issues. What you can do is mark several level spots on the wall which runs parallel with your joists. Since you have a 4' level I recommend putting it on the wall and marking a dot every 2 feet or less so that when you go to mark your next dot you can line up the level on 2 previous dots instead of ...


2

You won't be able to (economically) build a platform to set the pool on -- water weighs a lot! Supposing that pool is round and 20 feet diameter, when filled to 50" depth it would contain about 9800 gallons and weigh almost 82000 pounds. A truckload of sand leveled on top of the driveway is probably the only way you'd make a "platform" to support this weight....


2

I've built and owned several sheds on similar bases. What you'll find is that the weight of the shed and the vibration of use tends to settle the foundation (floor framing) into the soil a bit, eliminating slight wiggles in the surface. The key is that you have a good average, and that it's level in both directions. Obviously most of the weight rests on the ...


1

You have a couple options, but only one will make it look truly right without creating an oddly-shaped fascia or a ski jump in your roof. You'll need to raise the rafter tails. They're likely low in the middle because either the wall is sagging or the rafters weren't cut or fit well to begin with. I would examine how the rafters are fastened to the wall ...


1

I use sand , if you don’t mind killing the grass the same can be used in your yard with some railroad ties, put a tarp over the sand so it doesn’t wash out and it can last for a long time , usually tall pools are left up. I will also put a tarp down on the asphalt to protect the liner it will last longer if not in direct contact with the asphalt. And if ...


1

If the tyres are blown out then its sitting on the rims, damaging them and whatever hard surface it is resting on. You should purchase a pair of axle-stands per axle on the vehicle. The stands should be of sufficient capacity to support the whole vehicle when finished. Lift the vehicle onto the stands by using a vehicle jack. Two stands per axle, so you ...


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