Hot answers tagged

55

It's useful when using the level in the vertical direction (to e.g., check studs for plumb-ness) so that the bubble is at or near eye level no matter which end is up.


44

For a spirit level to work the tube cannot be perfectly straight and of constant diameter. For the bubble to float towards the middle either the tube curves up towards the middle (a "block vial") or it has greater diameter towards the middle (a "barrel vial"). If it is curved up towards the middle - the cheapest alternative - it won't work upside down. In ...


7

Went through this recently myself. I'd try to limit the joist-to-joist out-of-flatness to 1/8" or less. If it's an obvious part of the ceiling, try for 1/16". Get a long straightedge and a pile of drywall shims. High joists are pretty easy: add shims to bring them down to flat with the others. Low joists require you to build up the adjacent joists ...


6

It is also possible to do the final smoothing of the rough squared off faces by using a router. The router rides in a set of movable supports that you arrange over the end of the log and the router bit can cut to a smooth finish across the whole log face. As you make each pass with the router you slide the movable supports over an appropriate amount and then ...


5

I use a hose level. To make one obtain at least six feet (2 m) of 5/8 inch clear flexible tubing which has an outside diameter of 3/4 inch which is exactly the inner diameter of a standard garden hose. Cut into two lengths of 2–3 feet and slide the tubing inside each end of the hose 4–6 inches. It should form a good enough seal without any ...


5

I like taking small crowns out of concrete floors with diamond cup wheel attached to an angle grinder... Need a shop vac and a masked helper. You may be able to rent both.


5

Your plan for using builder's string is good, but don't set the string tight. That opens you up to cumulative contact error. You'll end up with a soup bowl for a ceiling. Instead, put a spacer of a convenient thickness under the string at the outside. I've often used a scrap of 1x or 2x lumber (3/4" and 1-1/2", respectively). Then you'd measure the ...


4

The nature of what you are proposing here is really beyond what you can get proper response to from a group of folks on the internet. You really need to subscribe the services of a structural engineer in your area before you "break into" anything. They will be way more experienced to evaluate things like: Existing foundation structure Building construction ...


4

You need to get professionals to do this, imho, as the structure will need supporting while the floor-base is sorted out. That structure has significant weight and supporting it while providing sufficient access to the bits that need repairs / replacement is not a simple task.


4

Not a full answer, exactly, but enough additional comments to the answer by @Ack that I thought I could get away with it. Just to reiterate, you don't need fire rating, unless the kitchen ceiling happened to abut a different unit within the house. Then I'm not sure. 1/8" - 1/4" out of level is pretty subtle. It would be noticeable if there was crown ...


3

it this case, it is not a home improvement project. Since it is a commercial building, you really need to have an engineer design a fix. the liability is to great in rental or commercial property not to have it endorsed. Don't take a cheap fix, it will bite you. The safety of a lot of people depend on how you fix the problem.


3

The laser beam itself will barely be dissipated by the sunlight, check the specs on each device for their range. The difficulty seeing the laser can be attributed to the sunlight flooding all* light spectra/frequencies as well as sensitizing your eyes (or camera white balance) to light. Creating a shadow with your hand near the laser point on the wall should ...


3

Your cheapest and easiest option is a spacer under the foot. A small piece of plywood or a couple of wood shims will do the trick. Both will be available at a home improvement center or lumber supplier.


3

Option #2: Unscrew the other three feet a little bit.


3

The common tool to do this is a level. One that is 4 feet long is better because it can check the floor over a wider area for flatness and level. You really only need to check the area where you intend to set the book shelf and not the whole room. A level like this would not be considered an advanced tool as they are rather simple devices. If you find the ...


3

Leveling compounds are a last resort. They're a pain to work with and make future work more difficult. The right way to fix this is now, while you have the framing accessible. In a room that small, an inch out of level is certainly significant. You'd feel it every time you walked in. Either rip strips to stack onto your joists, or sister 2x4s to them with ...


3

Honestly, if they tried to sneak that by you I'd say all is fair in love and war. I would pile all things heavy in the farthest reaches of the cantilever section and force it down. Only if you are able to hire someone else to do the repairs and have them pay for it. That's despicable. The cantilevered section has no foundation so that part can't be a ...


3

Fire rated sheathing is not required anywhere inside a residence with the exception of the garage. It is fine to use 1/2" drywall on spans up 24" oc if you place it perpendicular to the supports, and up to 16" oc if applied parallel to the supports. Using wood shims is just fine and common.


3

You're assuming that your floor is level; this will lead to issues. What you can do is mark several level spots on the wall which runs parallel with your joists. Since you have a 4' level I recommend putting it on the wall and marking a dot every 2 feet or less so that when you go to mark your next dot you can line up the level on 2 previous dots instead of ...


3

The approach by @isherwood is correct. However, a very simple tool I've used that may make it simpler to fine-tune the plane is an 8 foot aluminum straight edge. They're inexpensive, about $25. The one I use is anodized aluminum (light), is easily broken down into four foot sections and has virtually no flex, especially if used on edge. By sliding it across ...


3

Since the floor is needing to be replaced with plywood to get a good base, I would remove the rest of the existing subfloor and plane down the high spot, if it is truly high. Over time. joists will develop a sag in the middle, so where though it may be truly high in the area you suggest, it may actually be level with the rest of the floor at bearing walls. ...


2

First, you need to find out WHY the floor is uneven. Are the joists sagging? Then you might have some structural issues. From your description, it sounds like you have no boards over the joists right now. Is this correct? I would not cut the joists, as this will cause structural weakening. You might be able to use a block-plane to shave down a ...


2

If you only have chips and small holes to fix, the floor patch and leveler will be a sufficient and cheaper. If the holes are minor ( < 1/2" deep and < 1" in diameter), skim coating the area with your thinset and then pulling the notched trowel will safely allow you to bridge with 12x12 tiles.


2

You can hire someone to grind down the floor. I had this done in my house. It only took a few hours for the worker to remove a lot of material. He used a large diamond grinder that looked like a floor polisher. It was noisy and dusty. We sealed off the room from the rest of the house. That really helped keep the mess under control.


2

Lie down and eyeball it. It's easier to see if you are right down on the surface. Someone in the business of laying floors might have developed a better eye than you (if they miss it, it costs them money) and not need to lie down. Shoot a laser pointer across the floor - either skim the surface looking for discontinuities, or lay it on the floor and check ...


2

You could do either: level the floor or level the individual parts (shower enclosure, vanity, toilet) Which you choose will depend on the degree of out-of-level Self Leveler: self leveler does not need to stay intact after the backer board install. It can fracture and still completely support the backer board.. its got nowhere to go and it doesn't ...


2

This really depends on the degree to which the bed posts are out of level, the floor type you are using and the diameter of the post contact on the ground. It sounds like you are going wood posts, what I would do there is to get a few Cork or rubber Adhesive floor protectors (like below) The problem there, is that you need to find material which is ...


2

One way to address this problem is to acquire a lower door threshold seal unit that slides onto the bottom of the door and is adjustable by sliding up and down to the threshold. They are then fixed into place using screws through the side flanges into the lower rail of the door. Here is a picture of what the product looks like. They are sized to the ...


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