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4

The 2x4 ledger is sufficient to support your 2x8 joists, but it needs 4 or 5 16d common nails per stud at 16" on center to be able to carry the load if it is only carrying the floor load and no roof load. Typically the framers would have also nailed the side of the floor joist to the side of the wall stud so the the ledger isn't carrying all of the load, but ...


3

Either will work. They'll both hold up a conventional roof of that size without issue. Your concern is more a matter of diagonal bracing, especially if the posts won't be in the ground.


3

Typically, an aluminum or galvanized "z flashing" as you called it, would be installed under the siding, over the top of the ledger and down the upper lip a little. Decking is installed on top of this flashing. (Diagram not to scale) Done this way there is no need for any of the other products you mentioned unless you have moisture or insect ...


3

I would be concerned about putting that much over all weight on drywall. Even though it may be supported by the floor. The facing on drywall is only paper. When the thinset is applied, the paper will get wet, which it will, even with coats of paint over it. Even if the paper stayed bonded to the gypsum core, that is all it is bonded to. Gypsum has no real ...


2

Attaching ledger boards to a steel reinforced reasonably thick (12” or more) concrete pad is standard practice in deck construction. Use 4 1/2” concrete anchors 18” apart in a zig zag pattern - per engineered drawings for my high end deck projects


2

Since the new rafter section will cover any siding you may remove, layout how far the rafter section covers the siding and cut it about a 1/4 to a 1/2" lower. This will let you find the framing pretty easily, even remove a little subsiding to confirm, careful how deep you set your saw. This will show any conditions you may need to attend to. Set the bottom ...


2

The fact is that your deck's weight load must be carried underneath it and not using the cinder blocks supporting your garage. That does not limit you from attaching it to the garage to provide horizontal stability and to keep movements in unison. You would simply need to bolt in a faux ledger to the cinder blocks. Make sure that you have at least two ...


2

There is nothing wrong with this from an architectural standpoint. Honestly you should only have tied in framework touching the support posts. Meaning here - if the footing heaves, the ledger is failing no matter what. Either it adjusts because of the tie or the concrete, result is the same. It would be against standards (and maybe code) to have non-...


2

It's only a problem to the extent that you're hanging common joists on the unsupported portion of the ledger and therefore relying on the integrity of the woodgrain. If your joist hangers only attach on the upper portion, where the ledger is well attached to the framing, I see no concern. If your hanger attachment extends lower than that, either anchor to ...


2

This question is either subjective (based on opinion and personal standards of quality) or is a warranty issue. In either case it's probably off-topic. That said, here are my thoughts. Yes, adhering the cementboard sheet to the drywall will add stiffness--probably enough to result in a satisfactory substrate, especially when considering the large size of ...


2

In case someone finds this question later, MiTek (who makes USP hangers and ties, similar to Simpson), has a technical bulletin illustrating the screw placement and minimum clearances for different 2x dimensions when attaching a ledger board to studs, with or without gypsum board:


2

If I understand your question correctly, the problem is that the green highlighted double joist is going to land on the joint between your two boards making up the 22' ledger attached to the house. I see a couple of options: So long as the fasteners (ledger to wall) aren't in the way of the joist hangers, have the ledger joint right there and use a standard ...


2

There is nothing in the Building Code that requires a deck be attached to the house. However, if it is, then the Code requires at least two steel straps near the ends of the deck and attached to the foundation or floor joists. If you live in a seismically active area or high wind area we know the deck will move differently than the house during an “event”.


1

If the new ledger is pressure-treated, you shouldn't have to worry too much about it rotting any time soon. Butt the deck boards up against your masonry foundation wall and run a good bead of exterior caulk along there, like this:


1

I have built 3 sheds using two 2X4 at each corner ( two were 8' X 12', one was 8' X 16' and 2 stories). I used 2 X 4 on 16" centers and 1/2 " plywood walls. None fell down or blew away. All were set on flat concrete or cement blocks. The compressive strength of southern pine is about 13,000 psi so using a design value of 5000 psi appears safe. As noted you ...


1

Structurally this is a marginal installation. Those are Simpson A35 Angles (clips). They have an allowable load of between 510 lbs. and 600 lbs. each depending on the species and grade of the beam. I’ll assume your beams are 4’ on center and span 12’ (the short distance of your deck size) and Code requires a Live Load of 40 psf and a Dead load of 10 psf ...


1

Well, you aren't going to keep all the water out. The builder should've applied a water barrier before pouring the concrete. You'll have to decide whether the sheathing is degraded enough that you need to replace it. Here's what I'd do (after letting everything dry out well): Procure some flexible waterproof membrane such as ice and water shield or window ...


1

I had a deck where the rim joist bowed out, and the cross joists came unattached. I used two car jacks to get everything back up to level to be reassembled and use proper joist hangers. Safety tip, use the jacks to lift, but once up, set a stack of lumber or blocks to hold it up while working underneath. If you have some 4x4 stock (or 2 2x4s edgewise), don'...


1

If it's properly treated for ground contact, "do nothing" works just fine. Entire foundations are made of properly pressure-treated wood.


1

Hard to tell whether you have screws or nails holding everything together right now. It is either nails - which can, relatively easily, come apart, or screws which can come apart but not as easily. If you have nails then I would reinforce using some long (e.g., 3") screws and you should be set. I would want two screws into the end of each tread. The railing ...


1

There are shorter nails, but there are also short screws available. I'd go with the screws every time. For example these are made by Simpson and fully approved for use with their hangers. Note that the #10 screws are the correct size to replace 16d nails.


1

Joist hangers resist loads in shear, not withdrawal. While a 16d is more common, full resistance is developed in a 2x. Simpson Strong-Tie makes a short nail that is 1 1/2” long x 9 ga. diameter. Oh, and be sure to order the nails treated (galvanized) or stainless steel based on the type of pressure treated ledger.


1

Your design (2x10’s at 12” oc spanning 20’-8”) will support about 38 lbs. per square foot for #2s and about 55 lbs. per square foot for #1s, depending on the species. (I used Douglas Fir-Larch.) I’m assuming the joists will fasten to the ledger with joist hangers...not sit on the ledger. So, I’d recommend a single 2x10 ledger (not a double), but it depends ...


1

The board is a fascia board, which hides the rim joist. It's only nailed or screwed in. I need to remove it, so I can attach the ledger.


1

The reason the Code does not approve pocket installation of joists and beams is because it is difficult, if not impossible, to install hangers properly in pockets. Joists, and especially beams, need to be supported for vertical loading and lateral loading. In order to do that, the joists and beams need to be fastened (nailed or bolted) into a steel hanger ...


1

I think I'd get an engineer involved and design some steel plates to be bolted to the ends of your joists. I'd then use appropriately heavy 2x4 joist hangers on a half-height ledger. It would look something like this (profile view): ______________________________________________ |------------------------------------ || * * * | ||...


1

DAGS for SIP ledger detail, e.g. http://www.extremepanel.com/Details/PDF/EP-120.pdf - if you have enough info about the house to know who made the panels, look for info specific to (or from) them, .vs. generic panel info.


1

You are always going to get some water behind the vinyl siding that is what the housewrap is for. You can caulk the sides if you want too but its not necessary. Water that makes it to the inside of the j channel will also get behind the siding.


1

You want to attach the ledger to the edge of a concrete pad? Sounds like a terrible idea to me. It's possible that an engineer could have designed a way to carry the load through the pad and into the ground, but that would have to have been done before pouring the pad. Attaching the ledger to an existing pad, will almost certainly crack, split, or ...


1

Simpson makes brackets that can be attached with joist hanger nails that are NOT joist hangers; I have them on the ends of my stair stringers. Most likley the: L/LS/GA Reinforcing and Skewable Angles I suppose other companies make similar things, though to some extent SST is such a behemoth I don't know of any others in my local market. Anyway, if the ...


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